Government rules led electronic health records astray. It’s time to reimagine them

first_imgFirst OpinionGovernment rules led electronic health records astray. It’s time to reimagine them Adobe [email protected] Andrew Muchmore Please enter a valid email address. About the Author Reprints Newsletters Sign up for STAT Health Tech Your weekly guide to how tech is transforming health care and life sciences. With the passage of the HITECH Act in 2009, the Department of Health and Human Services successfully pushed the medical community to adopt electronic health records. Leading that effort was the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC).After 10 years of use and billions of dollars of investment, electronic health records (EHRs) have not only failed to live up to their potential but have helped create a crisis in medicine.To be sure, developing computer software to cover modern medical care is a daunting task. But what has been virtually ignored in the blame game is how designs mandated by ONC have virtually assured that electronic health records will be poorly designed and excessively complex.advertisement For example, the protocols required electronic health record companies to create test users who were then instructed by the testing proctor to place an order for two different medications and then go back and change the order without leaving any trace that the order had been modified — something that goes against best practices. An order should never be erased once they are entered. The clinical portion was rife with other errors: test protocols that included drugs that had been withdrawn from the U.S. market, incorrect laboratory values, and the like.Another major cause of user frustration is ONC’s mandate that electronic health records force users to document to certain coding schemes. For example, providers are required to document a patient’s smoking history using the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine — what everyone calls SNOMED — codes. There are nine different ways to “smoke” (or not), and these overlap in confusing ways.A “never smoker” is an individual who has smoked fewer than 100 cigarettes in his or her lifetime. After making that determination, however, providers have to pick from eight different ways to smoke: every day smoker, some day smoker, heavy tobacco smoker, light tobacco smoker, and the like.This kind of complexity and reliance on rigid coding systems permeated the ONC requirements. It affects how clinicians document a patient’s spoken language, allergies, ethnicity, diagnosis assigned, drugs administered, and so on. The list covers virtually every aspect of EHR documentation.To add to the complexity, there was no uniformity in the design of the back-end data. For example, one set of diagnosis codes (ICD-10) was required for reimbursement, while another more complex set of diagnosis codes (SNOMED) was required to document patient care. The net effect is that a patient’s clinical issues are stored in two incompatible formats. This duplication and inconsistency affects all aspects of documentation, from medications dispensed to procedures performed. Through a series of expert committees, ONC developed certification and testing criteria that electronic health records had to meet to become certified in 2011. By that time, my company, Codonix, had been providing clinical EHR systems for 15 years, first to hospital emergency departments and later to physician-owned clinics. It was clear to me from the beginning of the new ONC testing protocols that almost no clinical oversight had gone into their development.advertisement Related: Current electronic health records have a number of usability issues. A 2018 survey of physicians across the U.S. by Stanford Medicine and the Harris Poll found that 59% of physicians users felt that their EHR needed a “complete overhaul.” Users estimated that 62% of their time was spent entering data into the EHR, leaving only 38% of their time to be spent directly with patients. That is just one of many studies linking the use of electronic health records to physician burnout. Critics complain of complex rigid user interfaces, interminable cascading check boxes, lack of clinical content, and a focus on business and regulatory issues instead of patient care. Covid-19 will be the ultimate stress test for electronic health record systems By Andrew Muchmore March 27, 2020 Reprints Leave this field empty if you’re human: These design criteria forced EHR developers to require clinical users to follow complex coding rules, virtually guaranteeing user dissatisfaction.ONC also required electronic health record developers to support several complex and incompatible protocols used to communicate with different EHRs, with the patient, with state immunization records, and with the Department of Health and Human Services itself to report quality measures. A total of five different incompatible communication protocols are required. Because each of these require different data elements, EHR designers must force users to document encounters to meet the requirements of these various protocols. Submitting an influenza immunization message to a state registry, for example, requires users to enter the patient’s next of kin and mother’s maiden name. This level of complexity and inconsistency is not user friendly.The mission of ONC has transformed over time from one of encouraging the adoption of electronic health records to one that purports to improve health care quality through the use of ONC-mandated systems.Under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), users must report quality measures using a system that is so burdensome and confusing that a mini industry has sprouted up to coach and guide users on how to aggregate and submit data — if not game the system. These reporting requirements are mandated despite the overwhelming clinical consensus that this type of data submission is time consuming, probably counterproductive, and is becoming cost prohibitive.Although studies have shown that electronic health records can lead to better reporting (by which I mean box-checking), there is almost no evidence that they lead to better outcomes for patients. In Stanford’s poll, 92% of respondents felt that their EHR had little to no value for clinical decision support. In a survey conducted by the Medical Group Management Association, 76% of respondents felt that MIPS reporting played no role in improving patients’ clinical outcomes.The Department of Health and Human Services has a poor track record designing software — just think Healthcare.gov — and EHR software is several orders of magnitude more complex. As currently implemented and designed by committee, the existing ONC requirements are best described as spaghetti code.Instead of simplifying and standardizing back-end data collection — which would be transparent to the doctor, nurse, or other user and would allow EHR designers to focus on clinical usability — ONC has instead opted to use electronic health records as a reporting tool instead of as clinical a clinical documentation tool, putting the design paradigm backwards.Electronic health records should not be expected to support 28 different coding schemes and multiple communication protocols, each with their own limitations, which subtly or blatantly force users to follow certain rules. Instead, these potentially transformative systems should be designed with the provider and the patient at the center.Rather than designing clinical software, ONC should focus on analyzing, simplifying, and standardizing the huge amount of information stored in the background. Rigid, outdated, and incompatible coding and communication protocols need to be simplified and rationalized.Physicians have long been trained to document patient encounters in organized and structured ways. A medical chart should be designed so clinicians can quickly scan and abstract all of the necessary information about a patient in a short period of time. At the same time, EHRs can transparently generate a huge amount of discrete data ranging from drug codes to diagnosis codes to procedure codes. In short, normal clinical records generated by a typical electronic health record system are a treasure trove of organized and coded information; there is no need to force them into cumbersome reporting structures.Google can abstract an enormous amount of information from unstructured text. Imagine the power of similar algorithms when used to analyze health data that is not only already organized but also has a huge amount of attached discrete data. In this regard, the ONC and electronic health record makers can learn a lot from Google.Andrew Muchmore, M.D., is the founder, chairman, and chief technology officer of Codonix.last_img read more

North Korea Finally Accepts 27

first_imgNews North Korea Finally Accepts 27 Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following “paratyphoid” outbreak By Kim Yong Hun – 2011.03.15 5:36pm There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest News North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China After more than a month of wrangling, the South Korean administration has announced that 27 North Koreans will be repatriated across the Northern Limit Line in the West Sea tomorrow. This morning, North Korea apparently sent a telephone message to the South in which it stated, “With consideration for the feelings of the families whom are waiting for these detained people, send the 27 people first by sea.” In response, the Ministry of Unification apparently sent a telephone message to the Chosun Red Cross Society in which it agreed, saying, “Based on humanitarian considerations, we will repatriate the 27 North Korean citizens by sea.” Given the existence of a warning about high seas, the Ministry said it also stated that it would be prepared to repatriate the 27 via Panmunjeom on the morning of the 16th, if necessary. North Korea did not mention the other four members of the 31-man group who have said they wish to defect. On this, an official with the Ministry pointed out, “Since they made clear their intention to remain in South Korea of their own free will, there is no particular change in their treatment.”center_img AvatarKim Yong Hun RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News Facebook Twitter News SHARElast_img read more

$100 Million to Address Social Concerns of Sugar Workers

first_imgRelated$100 Million to Address Social Concerns of Sugar Workers Advertisements $100 Million to Address Social Concerns of Sugar Workers UncategorizedMay 3, 2007 Related$100 Million to Address Social Concerns of Sugar Workerscenter_img Related$100 Million to Address Social Concerns of Sugar Workers FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The government is to spend $100 million to address the social concerns of sugar workers.This was disclosed by Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller during her contribution to the 2007/08 Budget Debate in the House of Representatives on Tuesday (May 1).She said the Ministry of Agriculture and Lands has engaged in consultations with trade union leaders and was in the process of developing a comprehensive programme to deal with training, health care, housing and other pressing social needs which affect sugar workers.The Prime Minister said the $100 million was only the beginning, adding that a Sugar Unit was being established at the Ministry of Agriculture and Lands to determine the social needs of the industry and how they could be addressed.Mrs. Simpson Miller pointed out that the National Housing Trust (NHT) has earmarked $6 billion for sugar workers’ housing and that 1,891 lots have already been delivered to workers at New Yarmouth, Monymusk, Frome, Appleton, Bernard Lodge and Bellrock.A further 819 lots are planned for delivery to workers at Stokes Hall, Long Pond and Hampden, she added. Under the programme, sugar workers have the option of purchasing one bedroom and studio units, or access a benefit under the National Housing Trust’s Build-On-Own Land programme.last_img read more

Partnership and Consensus Needed to Tackle Economic Issues

first_imgAdvertisements Partnership and Consensus Needed to Tackle Economic Issues UncategorizedSeptember 29, 2008 RelatedPartnership and Consensus Needed to Tackle Economic Issues RelatedPartnership and Consensus Needed to Tackle Economic Issuescenter_img RelatedPartnership and Consensus Needed to Tackle Economic Issues FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Minister without portfolio in the Ministry of Finance and the Public Service, Senator Don Wehby, says despite the current world financial crisis, Jamaica could learn lessons from the Irish economic model, and the social partnerships that it created.The Minister was speaking to JIS News following two days of high level talks in Ireland with senior Government and business executives. He was accompanied by Deputy Governor of the Bank of Jamaica, Livingston Morris.According to Senator Wehby, in the 1980’s Ireland’s high debt to GDP ratio, low actual growth and a devaluing currency , mirroed much of what is happening in Jamaica now, where there is a high level of debt and little growth.“The visit turned out to be an excellent one, and gave us some hope in terms of going forward. They invested very heavily in education, they did a major tax reform programme, and actually dropped the corporate income tax rate (from 30 to 12.5 per cent ) and, significantly, they went out very aggressively to promote foreign direct investments. Those three main areas as well as the social partnership, the consensus with the opposition, consensus with the unions, that this is the direction the country was moving, improved their economy,” he explains.He said for Jamaica to move forward, similar consensus is needed by everyone including the Opposition, and union stakeholders.“We need to attract foreign direct investment to get increased growth. We have been only growing at one per cent, and I think we need to get a minimum of three, three and half per cent, over the next few years , understanding that the world is going through a recession ,” he said.“But we have to put our house in order so when the recession ends, we can be in the front of the line in terms of growth. While things may look dull at this time with the whole financial market crisis, I think if we can get those things right, you are going to see a brighter Jamaica,” he said.The main focus of the minister’s visit was to meet with the National Treasury Management Agency in Ireland. “We wanted to see how they manage their central treasury unit because in Jamaica, our research shows that there could be tremendous benefit in terms of managing the government cash more efficiently using their system. Our meeting also looked at the central treasury management system . They highlighted to us their success, in fact, that when they started to manage the debt, the debt to GDP ratio was over 100 per cent, and now it is down to 25 because of the systems they have in place,” he added.last_img read more

Dstl exchange officer inducted into United States Space Force

first_imgDstl exchange officer inducted into United States Space Force Captain Jake Singteton, a United States Air Force officer on secondment with the UK’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), has been inducted into the United States Space Force (USSF).Captain Singleton attested his Oath of Office in a “virtual” ceremony attended by Air Vice Marshal Harv Smyth (UK Director Space), Col Charles Metrolis (Air Attaché, US Embassy, London), military and civilian colleagues and his family.The newest branch of the U.S. armed forces, USSF is a military service that organizes, trains, and equips space forces in order to protect U.S. and allied interests in space.Jake has been seconded to Dstl’s Space Programme under the US “Engineer and Scientist Exchange Programme” (ESEP), which aims to promote international cooperation in military research, development, and acquisition through the exchange of defence scientists and engineers. Jake has shown exemplary leadership and dedication to supporting the goals of ESEP to cultivate international cooperative endeavours, and it was an honour to have hosted his Oath of Office ceremony in the UK.Captain Singleton was instrumental in deepening US/UK relationships as the lead for International Space Pitch Day (ISPD). Funded by both US and UK defence departments ISPD aims to find, fund and fast-track innovation and technology, especially those from tech start-ups and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), that give advantage to military personnel and operations in the space domain.Captain Singleton said:“Working within the Space Programme at Dstl has been a highlight of my professional experience in the Air Force. I am energized by the successes we have had in increasing international cooperation and am convinced that it was only possible through that US and UK partnership. I plan to bring every lesson learned and relationship that I have developed here in the UK into my career with the US Space Force as everything we do in the future becomes a collaborative and global effort. I am grateful that I had the opportunity to take this step here in England while working directly with the UK team.”AVM Harv Smyth commented:“It is an enormous privilege to attend the ceremony today as Captain Jake Singleton transitions from USAF Airman to USSF Guardian. It has been phenomenal to watch from afar how the USSF has stood up, evolved, and is taking shape as a Service in its own right. I would also like to thank Jake personally for his tremendous efforts whilst serving in the UK, proving that the special relationship between our two great nations is stronger than ever, and making us all better for the experience.”Colonel Metrolis, who administered the Oath of Office, added:“As a previous exchange officer, I am honored to administer the Oath of Office to Captain Singleton. His leadership, devotion to country and now renewed dedication to the United States Space Force are shining qualities of an officer I am proud to serve with.”Dstl Chief Executive, Gary Aitkenhead, said:“Jake has made a considerable impact with Dstl as an exchange officer, notably with ISPD, which reflects our commitment to using the innovative abilities of SMEs to solve technological challenges in space. Exchange officers provide a valuable means of widening international collaboration which benefit both sides of our strategic alliance, and it is fitting Jake took his USSF Oath of Office while working alongside us at Dstl.”In addition to ISPD, Dstl is collaborating with US and other international partners on numerous research programmes to maintain safety and security in space, and ensure the continued operation of critical space infrastructure. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:acquisition, air force, Defence, director, Government, infrastructure, innovation, leadership, London, operation, Scientists, Singleton, technology, U.S., UK, UK Government, United Stateslast_img read more

Mini unveils all-electric concept car headed to Frankfurt Motor Show

first_imgCreated with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Mini Electric ConceptHandout, Mini Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Mini Electric ConceptHandout, Mini Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Mini Electric ConceptHandout, Mini Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Mini Electric ConceptHandout, Mini Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Mini Electric ConceptHandout, Mini Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Mini Electric ConceptHandout, Mini Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Mini Electric ConceptHandout, Mini Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Mini Electric ConceptHandout, Mini Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Mini Electric ConceptHandout, Mini Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Mini Electric ConceptHandout, Mini Mini‘s upcoming electric car is slowly but surely taking shape.Revealed just ahead of the Frankfurt Motor Show, Mini has given us a glimpse at its future three-door EV. Simply known as the Mini Electric Concept, it’s a rather stylish little hatchback and very recognizable as a Mini, despite some obvious differences in bodywork.Like Mini’s previous EV, the Mini E, yellow exterior accents suggest this little hatchback is all about electrons. But the latest places a large emphasis on aerodynamics, with a reworked front apron, various air deflectors and a fibreglass diffuser out back, and unique wheels, to name just a few of the tricks up the electric Mini’s sleeve. ‹ Previous Next › Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” Trending Videos We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. See More Videos PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca As for powertrain details, Mini has remained tight-lipped. At this point in time, all we know is the concept will feature a single electric motor. Of course, we’ll know more when the Frankfurt Motor Show officially kicks off in less than two weeks. RELATED TAGS3 DoorMINISE 3 DoorFrankfurtFrankfurt Motor ShowNewsAutomotive ShowsCars and Car DesignCulture and LifestyleFrankfurt Motor ShowHatchbacksMINI EMini ElectricPassenger Cars The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS If all goes to plan, we’ll see the Mini Electric Concept enter production in two years. Trending in Canada advertisementlast_img read more

VW will invest US$2.6 billion in Ford’s self-driving arm, deepening partnership

first_img We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. Trending Videos Trending in Canada Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 (From L-R) Jim Hackett, president and chief executive officer, Ford Motor Company, Bryan Salesky, chief executive officer and co-founder of Argo AI LLC and Herbert Diess, chief executive officer, Volkswagen Group, pose for a picture ahead of a press conference July 12, 2019 in New York City.  Johannes Eisele / Getty COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS Teaming up with its U.S. peer is one of the key initiatives of VW Chief Executive Officer Herbert Diess to overhaul the German industrial giant. Both sides reiterated on Friday the tie-up does not include entering equity ties between Ford and VW. BMW and Jaguar Land Rover will join forces on electric-car technologyBesides sharing costs for the development of self-driving cars, Ford will use VW’s electric-car underpinnings to form the backbone of the most aggressive rollout of electric cars in the industry, with Volkswagen spending some 30 billion euros (US$34 billion). Adding more vehicles to production lines would help gain scale and save costs, and offer Ford a platform to better comply with tougher rules on carbon-dioxide emissions in Europe.Ford will build at least one mass-market battery car in Europe starting in 2023 and deliver more than 600,000 European vehicles based on VW’s platform, dubbed MEB, over six years. A second electric model for Europe is under discussion. Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca RELATED TAGSFordVolkswagenNon-LuxuryNew VehiclesNon-Luxury The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever advertisement See More Videos ‹ Previous Next › “While Ford and Volkswagen remain independent and fiercely competitive in the marketplace, teaming up and working with Argo AI on this important technology allows us to deliver unmatched capability, scale and geographic reach,” Ford Chief Executive Officer Jim Hackett said.Unprecedented shifts facing the auto industry are forcing players to consider new partnerships and potential consolidation. VW, the world’s top automaker, offers the industry’s most ambitious roll-out of electric models, while Ford, also in the top 10, is developing advanced self-driving technology with Argo.For VW, the Argo investment offers an opportunity to potentially catch up with Alphabet Inc.’s Waymo, and General Motors’s Cruise unit. Road tests and accumulating huge amounts of data are critical for the further development of self-driving cars, and few apart from Waymo are equipped to do it alone.“It took a while to get this deal done, but it’s because we actually sorted out a lot of the hard problems,” Bryan Salesky, Argo AI’s co-founder and CEO, said in an interview. “We have a clear line of sight to production, vehicle supply and we have clear line of sight to where we want to go to market and how.”RELATED Ford CEO tamps down expectations for first autonomous vehicles Volkswagen and Ford will cooperate on electric and self-driving car technology, sharing costs on a global scale to take a major step forward in the industry’s disruptive transformation.VW will invest US$2.6 billion in Ford’s autonomous-car partner Argo AI in a deal that values the operation at more than US$7 billion, the two manufacturers said Friday in a joint statement in New York.This includes US$1 billion in funding and VW contributing its Audi US$1.6-billion Autonomous Intelligent Driving unit. last_img read more

CU-Boulder philosophy department to resume graduate admissions for 2015-16 academic year

first_img“I believe the department has had difficult conversations, worked through complicated issues of perspective and practice, and is well positioned now to accept graduate students in a better environment. The college appreciates Dr. Cowell’s efforts and those of the faculty, staff, graduate and undergraduate students in the department,” Leigh said. Published: Oct. 15, 2014 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mailcenter_img The University of Colorado Boulder philosophy department will resume admissions to its graduate program for the 2015-16 academic year.The move follows the enactment of reforms and changes begun last November across 10 major areas to address issues of discrimination, harassment and a combative work culture that previously existed inside the department. On Jan. 31, 2014, CU-Boulder Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano announced the appointment of Professor Andy Cowell as interim chair of philosophy in order to enact key reforms to transform the work culture and environment for women, students, faculty and staff in the department.Fact Sheet: Timeline of reforms and transformational measures in CU-Boulder philosophy department“I support the recommendation by Chair Cowell, Arts and Sciences Dean Steven Leigh and Provost Russell Moore to reinstate graduate admissions,” said DiStefano. “I am impressed by the number and scope of the measures taken under Andy’s leadership, and the way in which the faculty and staff in the department have worked hard, and continue to work, to build a positive environment for learning and teaching. This step reflects the progress they have made.”Cowell said over the course of the last nine months, the department’s faculty “had willingly participated in numerous facilitated department workshops, as well as activities and exercises to build the culture. They also took many other measures to address issues of harassment and discrimination, create a more positive and inclusive workplace, and improve instruction of and interaction with students at all levels.”He said the department had made progress across 10 major areas, including educating the department on issues of discrimination, preventing harassment and creating a collegial workplace; engaging in best practices as a department; dealing with issues of misconduct; forming an external advisory committee; focusing on diversifying faculty, staff and the student body; managing graduate student issues; supporting the actions of graduate students themselves; managing undergraduate issues; encouraging interdisciplinary work, and hiring new faculty.“The department’s work in all these areas is continuing, but I believe there is a new spirit of collegiality and common purpose that makes the environment suitable for supporting graduate work and sponsoring graduate students,” Cowell said. Sofia Hunter and Anthony Kelley, two graduate students who serve on the philosophy department’s climate committee, issued a statement of support for the move:“As the graduate student representatives to the Climate Committee, we are pleased that the philosophy department has taken the necessary steps to reopen graduate admissions. We hope that this development will encourage even more progress towards improving our department’s climate. We would like applicants to know that there are already practices in place to support incoming students. Specifically, we intend to work with other graduate students, other members of the climate committee, and departmental and university leadership to enhance and to strengthen several current mentorship programs wherein incoming graduate students, as well as undergraduates, are paired with faculty and senior graduate students. We are committed to helping incoming students integrate into the academic and social life of the department.”Leigh, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, singled out the work of Cowell and the entire department over the past nine months.“I believe the department has had difficult conversations, worked through complicated issues of perspective and practice, and is well positioned now to accept graduate students in a better environment. The college appreciates Dr. Cowell’s efforts and those of the faculty, staff, graduate and undergraduate students in the department,” Leigh said.CU-Boulder Provost Russell L. Moore echoed Leigh’s assessment, noting “we challenged the department to enact fundamental changes and move in bold new directions to change their own culture.”“Their response was laudable” Moore said. “I am hopeful that the department’s continued efforts to create a supportive environment for students, staff and faculty will serve as a model that will receive recognition matching its distinguished record of scholarly excellence.”More information about the philosophy department admissions process can be found at http://www.colorado.edu/philosophy.last_img read more

Education Minister Presents Principal With Leadership Award

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedEducation Minister says Non-Traditional High Schools Doing Well Story HighlightsSpeaking at the award ceremony at the school Rev. Thwaites commended Mr. Murray for his dedication and passionMeanwhile, the Education Minister gave his commitment to assist with the establishment of an infant department for the school. “Under his leadership, students’ performance in Grade Four Literacy and Numeracy Tests and the Grade Six Achievement improved significantly. RelatedNew Building for Students of Reliance Basic School Education Minister Presents Principal With Leadership AwardJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Education Minister Presents Principal With Leadership Award EducationDecember 2, 2013Written by: Glenis Rosecenter_img Photo: Glenis RoseMinister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites (left), presents Principal of the Lethe Primary School, Anthony Murray, with the Citation for the Leadership in Education Award, during a ceremony held at the school in Lethe, St. James, on November 29. The ceremony was held to honour the principal who has won the Award for his distinguished service in education. RelatedEducation Ministry Extends Consultation on Teaching Council Bill Minister of Education Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites on Friday, November 29, formally presented Principal of the Lethe Primary School in St. James, Anthony Murray with the prestigious Leadership in Education Award.Speaking at the award ceremony at the school Rev. Thwaites commended Mr. Murray for his dedication and passion, and love for his students.He told the audience of community members and representatives from the business and education fraternities that, primary education is critical and if improved, would lead to more success at the tertiary level.Meanwhile, the Education Minister gave his commitment to assist with the establishment of an infant department for the school.“I am hoping that next year this time, you will have an infant school alongside your primary school, because this is entirely consistent with government’s policy,” he said.In reading the Citation, Education Officer Daniel Warren Kidd, said that as Principal of the Lethe Primary School, Mr. Murray developed several plans and policies including health and sanitation, nutrition, school improvement, disaster management, school assessment as well as reading plans, punctuality, disciplinary and students’ governance policies.“Under his leadership, students’ performance in Grade Four Literacy and Numeracy Tests and the Grade Six Achievement improved significantly. At Grade Four the school’s average in literacy moved from 32 per cent in 2011 to 58 per cent in 2012 and to 62 per cent in 2013.  For numeracy which is his area of strength, coming from a low of four per cent in 2009, Mr. Murray has improved the school’s performance from 17 per cent in 2011 to 51 per cent in 2012 and to 55 per cent in 2013,” Mr. Kidd read.In 2006 Mr. Murray was selected as the LASCO/Ministry of Education Teacher of the Year for Region Four. This year, Mr. Murray was the first Runner Up for the LASCO/MOE Principal and Teacher of the Year Awards.The Leadership in Education Award was made possible through the Jamaica Teaching Council and the Ministry of Education, in collaboration with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).Minister of Education Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites on Friday, November 29, formally presented Principal of the Lethe Primary School in St. James, Anthony Murray with the prestigious Leadership in Education Award.Speaking at the award ceremony at the school Rev. Thwaites commended Mr. Murray for his dedication and passion, and love for his students.He told the audience of community members and representatives from the business and education fraternities that, primary education is critical and if improved, would lead to more success at the tertiary level.Meanwhile, the Education Minister gave his commitment to assist with the establishment of an infant department for the school.“I am hoping that next year this time, you will have an infant school alongside your primary school, because this is entirely consistent with government’s policy,” he said.In reading the Citation, Education Officer Daniel Warren Kidd, said that as Principal of the Lethe Primary School, Mr. Murray developed several plans and policies including health and sanitation, nutrition, school improvement, disaster management, school assessment as well as reading plans, punctuality, disciplinary and students’ governance policies.“Under his leadership, students’ performance in Grade Four Literacy and Numeracy Tests and the Grade Six Achievement improved significantly. At Grade Four the school’s average in literacy moved from 32 per cent in 2011 to 58 per cent in 2012 and to 62 per cent in 2013.  For numeracy which is his area of strength, coming from a low of four per cent in 2009, Mr. Murray has improved the school’s performance from 17 per cent in 2011 to 51 per cent in 2012 and to 55 per cent in 2013,” Mr. Kidd read.In 2006 Mr. Murray was selected as the LASCO/Ministry of Education Teacher of the Year for Region Four. This year, Mr. Murray was the first Runner Up for the LASCO/MOE Principal and Teacher of the Year Awards.The Leadership in Education Award was made possible through the Jamaica Teaching Council and the Ministry of Education, in collaboration with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Advertisementslast_img read more

UPDATED: Kalispell, Firefighters Announce Deal Averting Layoffs

first_img Email Kalispell officials and leaders of the firefighters’ union have reached a deal they said would avert the planned layoffs of seven firefighters. Kalispell City Manager Jane Howington, Mayor Tammi Fisher and local 547 President Kirk Pederson held a press conference at City Hall Friday morning to announce the agreement. “The concessions that were made were significant,” Fisher said of the firefighters. “I think it speaks volumes about their character.” On Thursday, Ricky Walsh, vice president of the International Association of Firefighters 7th District, offered to limit the financial impact of a new labor contract by capping the annual hours firefighters could work and giving city management more control over “Kelly Days.” Walsh confirmed Friday there were no changes in the deal from what he offered the previous day. Howington said a deal had not yet been signed, but that both sides “agreed in essence” to reopen the contract. One remaining disagreement was the wish by city officials to strip a provision from the firefighters’ employment contract providing a 2.4 percent pay increase in its third year. Though that provision remains, the firefighters agreed to meet and possibly review that stipulation next year should the economic fortunes of Kalispell remain stagnant. All sides expressed relief that a compromise had finally been reached in the contentious dispute. ORIGINAL STORY (POSTED THURSDAY):Kalispell city officials and union leaders are poised to reach a labor agreement that will avert the layoffs of seven firefighters. The deal could put an end to the stark disagreements between City Manager Jane Howington and leaders of the firefighters’ union that have been playing out publicly the last several weeks over the impact of a new labor contract on Kalispell’s finances. The local firefighters’ union brought in Ricky Walsh, vice president of the International Association of Firefighters 7th District, Wednesday to discuss with city officials ways to avert the layoffs. On Thursday afternoon, Walsh presented the city with a proposed change to the labor contract that would limit the hours firefighters can work annually, with the aim of saving Kalispell enough money to retain all 30 members of its Fire Department. “The savings is coming from the employer actually conveying its desire to not have layoffs and the employee group responding to that desire,” Walsh said. “It’s a pay cut,” Walsh added. “Instead of a few having a lot, all will have a little.” Howington, along with City Attorney Charles Harball and Adjutant City Attorney Rich Hickel plan to calculate the offer’s financial impacts, and meet with union leaders Friday morning to negotiate further, and potentially sign an agreement. Although differences persist – like the city’s desire to strip a provision providing a 2.4 percent salary increase in the third year from the contract – Mayor Tammi Fisher said she urged Howington and Harball to accept the deal. “I think the firefighters have made some significant concessions and that is reflective of their concerns, not only for maintaining the number of employees in the fire union, but also their concern for public safety,” Fisher said. Fisher implied an agreement on Friday was likely.“I will be very happy to congratulate the firefighters and city manager for their hard work on coming to compromise on a solution,” she said. Doug Schwartz, vice president of Local 547, said the agreement could be a tough sell for his fellow union members, who will almost certainly earn less when forced to work fewer hours. “Membership’s giving up an awful lot,” Schwartz said. “It’s a pretty stiff deal for some of our guys.” Howington notified the union April 5 she intended to lay off seven firefighters to account for the anticipated cost of $690,000 over three years from a new labor contract awarded to firefighters by an independent arbitrator in February. Three of those seven positions were funded by a federal grant Kalispell is obligated to give up if it lays off firefighters. The firefighters argued Howington’s calculations vastly overestimated the cost of the contract. But Howington maintained that because the contract limited city management’s control over the hours firefighters worked, she had to budget for the maximum annual hours possible. A key point of contention during contract negotiations and the ensuing dispute has been the cost of “Kelly Work Days,” which are days off that firefighters can volunteer to work for straight pay, known as a “Kelly Work Back.” Firefighters get 13 Kelly Days annually, and under the deal Walsh offered Thursday, they will no longer be able to work on those days, essentially turning them into furlough days. Firefighters will also have their workweeks reduced from 56 hours to 50 hours. “It gives the management more control of Kelly Days,” Walsh said. “We’ve eliminated that projected deficit in the Fire Department budget.”Howington has previously estimated the provision for Kelly Days in the new labor contract could cost Kalispell as much as $170,000. The savings, according to Walsh, should allow for the seven firefighters to remain on the force, describing his offer as, “something they can live with until we weather this recession storm.” The Beacon will update this story Friday with new developments. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more