Temer seeks to privatize Brazil’s deforestation remote sensing program

first_imgBrazil’s Ministry of the Environment, in a surprise move at the end of April, tried to privatize much of the remote sensing deforestation work that, until now, has been successfully carried out by INPE, the federal National Institute for Space Research. So sudden was the move that INPE’s head learned of it from a journalist.Under the plan, private companies would take over monitoring for Amazonia, the Cerrado (where Brazilian deforestation is most intense), and indigenous reserves (under attack by the Temer administration). Experts view the move as a bow to the powerful agribusiness lobby, which wants more control of Amazonia, the Cerrado and indigenous preserves.The hurried maneuver was met with shock from experts inside and outside the government, with charges that the 8-day bid process was absurdly short, and with some calling the proposal incompetent. Critics suggest the privatization bid process may have been designed to turn over deforestation remote sensing to a foreign company.Vocal protests from 6,000 experts led the Ministry of the Environment to shelve privatization for now; though the measure could still be revived. A concern of experts was that the company engaged would have played a key role in assessing whether or not Brazil was meeting its carbon reduction commitments under the Paris Climate Agreement. Sunset over the Amazon. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerIn the midst of the intense political turmoil unfolding in Brasilia, a government move has been largely ignored by the mainstream press that — if eventually carried forward — could seriously impact accurate satellite monitoring of Amazon deforestation.The scheme, some critics charge, was likely prompted by the bancada ruralista, the nation’s agribusiness lobby, which may be eager to end the independent analysis of remote sensing data that has shown a dramatic uptick in deforestation in recent years — an increase largely propelled by land thieves and cattle ranchers in the Amazon, and the soy industry in the Cerrado.On 20 April, Brazil’s Ministry of the Environment published an invitation to private companies to bid for some of the deforestation remote sensing services that have up until now been carried out by INPE (the government’s National Institute for Space Research). The invitation gave a very short period — eight days — for the companies to submit bids.At a cost of R$78 million (US$24 million), the company winning the contract would monitor deforestation in the Amazon and in other regions, including the Cerrado and on indigenous reserves. The Cerrado currently has the highest rate of deforestation in Brazil, while indigenous reserves and Indian land rights are under assault by the Temer administration.Importantly, the selected private company would play a key role in assessing whether or not Brazil was achieving its carbon reduction commitments made at the Paris Climate summit in December 2015.Deforestation in the world’s largest rainforest in 2016 jumped 29 percent over the previous year’s tally, representing a sharp increase over the historically low deforestation rate seen just five years ago, and the highest level recorded in the region since 2008. Data provided by INPEDeforestation by Brazilian state, 2010-2016. Researchers worry that privatization of remote sensing would cause a disruption in the long-term continuity of data gathering, potentially making future data less compatible with the past record and less valid for analysis. Data for chart provided by INPEThe ministry’s move took almost everyone by surprise. Ricardo Magnus Osório Galvão, the director of INPE, only heard of what had happened through a journalist. Not even the Ministry of Science, Technology, Innovations and Communication (MCTIC), to which INPE is attached, was consulted.Luiz Davidovich, the president of the Brazilian Academy of Science (ABC), and Helena Nadar, the president of the Brazilian Society for the Progress of Science (SBPC), jointly sent a letter to President Temer in which they expressed “surprise” and “indignation” at the high-handed way in which the decision was taken: “This unilateral position adopted by the Ministry of the Environment creates a fissure in its history of harmonious coexistence with the MCTIC.”But it wasn’t the abrupt way in which the new measure was announced that attracted most criticism from deforestation experts, but the content of the invitation to bid. Specialists in the field weighed in, expressing shock at the proposed changes.In an interview with Mongabay, Arnaldo Carneiro, a senior researcher at the National Institute of Amazonia Research (INPA) and an expert in geo-information science, said: “The way in which it [the notice to bid] was drawn up demonstrates total incompetence in the subject, for it mixes services, equipment and monitoring. They [the people drawing up the notice] showed such incompetence that they weren’t even able to assess the quality of the service given by INPE.”Ricardo Magnus Osório Galvão, the director of INPE, only heard of the plan to privatize much of the deforestation remote sensing work of his agency from a journalist. The drive to privatize comes at a time of immense political conflict in Brazil, and critics say that this conflict may be being used by the agribusiness lobby as a smokescreen to press its anti-environmental agenda. Photo courtesy of INPEOther experts told the direto da ciencia website that the new deal would allow the Ministry of the Environment to assess the work done by the firm it contracted, ending the present set-up by which appraisals are carried out by an independent research body. “This will generate a conflict of interests,” the experts said.A petition to the environmental minister, José Sarney Filho, was quickly organized, and has received support from more than 6,500 responders. That document made three criticisms of the proposed privatization, noting that 41 percent of the work to be carried out by the private company winning the bid is already done by existing organizations, mainly INPE; that contracting a new company, with a different system, would make historical comparisons very difficult; and that the term of eight days to prepare a bid was vastly inadequate.The Environment Ministry responded to the criticisms. Marcelo Cruz, the executive secretary at the Environment Ministry, told the Estado de S. Paulo that the ministry’s goal is to broaden their supply of data so they can create what he called “a center of governance.” The objective, he said, was not to replace the Prodes satellite monitoring program run by INPE, but to provide information in real time to support the work.The protests against privatization continued to gain momentum, until the ministry felt it had no option but to backtrack and reconsider its proposal. It decided on 4 May to withdraw the invitation to bid in order to adjust the terms of reference. The ministry said it would be reissuing the offer in the near future. No action has been taken since then.No one knows whether or not a new offer to bid will, in fact, be issued. Mongabay contacted the Ministry of the Environment to find out but it declined to grant an interview.Marcelo Cruz (center), Environment Ministry executive director, said the ministry’s goal is to broaden the supply of data to create “a center of governance” and offer information in real time to support the work of INPE. Vocal critics say privatization would eliminate independent analysis of deforestation data and potentially create a conflict of interest that could invite data bias. Photo courtesy of the MMADespite its withdrawal for now, the privatization proposal has left many specialists in the field uneasy. Off the record, researchers told the direto da ciencia website that the technical requirements demanded by the Ministry of the Environment were so complex and the timescale so short that almost no Brazilian institute would be able to compete. They feared that one of the results — and, indeed, perhaps, one of the objectives — was to allow a foreign company to take over.Ricardo Folhes, a specialist in remote sensing, told Mongabay that he believed that the ministry proposed the change for political reasons: “It is very clear; the ministry wants autonomy to manage the devastation data on its own.” But, he warned, by taking the action it had announced, the ministry risked destroying one of the public sector’s most consistent monitoring systems, and weakening INPE, one of Brazil’s most solid research institutions.Folhes agrees with others speaking off the record that the bancada ruralista, the nation’s powerful agribusiness lobby, lies behind the initiative, but is confident that they will not succeed: “The government doesn’t have the legitimacy to dismantle a quality public service, like the one run by INPE, and to hand it on a plate to the ruralists, who know very well what they want to do with it.”There is no doubt that underlying the privatization debate is deep concern over the alarming increase in Amazon deforestation now underway. Rates fell throughout most of the 2005-2012 period, but grew sharply over the last two years. The 29 percent leap in 2016, to almost 8,000 square kilometres (3,0809 square miles), has made the country’s climate objective — agreed to in Paris — to reduce felling to 3,900 square kilometers (1,506 square miles) by 2020, a difficult goal to achieve.Against a backdrop of dark green Amazon rainforest, fires follow highway BR 163 (lower center to top left). Fires are set to clear forest for agriculture, a process that reveals red-brown soils. A long line of new cleared patches snakes east from BR 163 towards the remote valley of the Rio Crepori. Extensive deforested areas in Brazil’s state of Mato Grosso appear as tan areas across the top of the image. Fires show the advance of deforestation into the state of Pará, the area shown in most of this view. Pará is now second after Mato Grosso in terms of deforestation acreage in Brazil. Photo courtesy of NASAOne of the main reasons for the increase, argues the Environment Ministry’s Marcello Cruz, is the lack of real time data, which, he says, will be provided through the new privately contracted arrangement. But Ricardo Folhes sees things very differently: “Forest felling and the increase we are seeing today are not a result of problems in monitoring, but of a set of reactionary, predatory and ethnocide political and private policies.”The budget given to IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency, to monitor deforestation was cut by almost half from 2013 to 2015, reduced from R$ 121 million ($37 million) to R$ 65 million ($20 million), making it nearly impossible for the agency to capture and fine those responsible for illegal deforestation detected by INPE’s satellite imaging.Like others consulted for this story, Folhes believes that the considerable investment the Ministry of the Environment is prepared to make in privatization would be much better spent in reversing the huge cut in IBAMA’s budget and improving on the current remote sensing program.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Deforestation in Rondônia state in western Brazil. After a long decline, deforestation in the Amazon saw a rapid and alarming rise over the last two years, as pressure grows from land thieves and ranchers. In the neighboring Cerrado, deforestation is driven by the soy industry. Photo courtesy of NASA Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corruption, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Featured, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Threats To The Amazon last_img read more

Betting on agroforestry in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest

first_imgArticle published by Erik Hoffner Guapiruvu is a rural neighborhood in the Vale do Ribeira, home to the largest remaining stretch of Atlantic Forest in Brazil, and listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.The area has implemented a sustainable development plan, with many farmers opting for organic agriculture and agroforestry since they can sell their produce at a 30 percent premium.This system grows bananas in combination with “pé de ata” (Annona squamosa) and juçara, an endangered species endemic to the region.This is the second feature in a year-long series on agroforestry, an increasingly popular solution to challenges like climate change, food insecurity, and the biodiversity crisis. Agroforestry systems cover over a billion hectares of land worldwide. GUAPIRUVU, Brazil – To reach Guapiruvu one has to drive 20 kilometers (12 miles) on a gravel road. The first houses are big, solid, holiday homes for the wealthy people of Sete Barras. Farther away from the city, though, the houses become smaller and scattered. Every now and then, birds of many shapes and colors swiftly cross the road. From the passenger seat, Gilberto Ohta  names them as we pass them by.It’s hard to know you’ve reached Guapiruvu because there are no signs and the neighborhood lacks a center. In some places, two or three houses form what locals call a vila, but most of the time houses are isolated. Between them, banana plantations extend in all directions. To get around, people drive motorbikes — always without helmets and more often than not without shirts. Everyone passing by casts curious glances inside our car. Once they recognize Gilberto, they greet us and smile.Gilberto Ohta shows off his neighbor Geraldo’s agroforestry system. The soil is always covered to prevent the loss of water and provide organic matter. Image by Ignacio Amigo for MongabayThere’s nothing opulent about Guapiruvu, but farmers here don’t look as poor as in many other places in Brazil. As I found out during my visit, there are many reasons why this could be. A strong sense of solidarity, cooperation and environmental consciousness among locals are perhaps some of them. In this scenario, it’s not surprising that many farmers are turning to agroforestry — a system of growing trees, shrubs and crops together in a way that diversifies production while sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, providing habitat for wildlife, and increasing food security for farmers.As we visit the neighborhood and some of the agroforestry systems there, Gilberto shares with me the recent history of this land and how they managed to better divide its wealth among all its residents.Guapiruvu’s agendaGuapiruvu is a rural neighborhood of Sete Barras, a municipality of 13,000 in the Vale do Ribeira, in the state of São Paulo. Flanked by two state parks, the neighborhood sits at the heart of Brazil’s largest continuous remnant of Atlantic Forest, one of the richest biomes in the world, of which only 15 percent of the original extent remains today.In the 1980s and early ’90s, farming was a profitable activity in Guapiruvu — at least for those who owned land. Gilberto was one of the lucky few. His father was an influential man who bought cheap land here in the ’60s, and was even mayor of Sete Barras from 1982 to 1992. At the time, Gilberto was following his footsteps.“My father exploited many of the people in Guapiruvu. Even I exploited them,” Gilberto admits.Bananas from Gilberto’s agroforestry system. Image by Ignacio Amigo for MongabayToday, he is one of the community leaders, and it’s difficult to imagine him as an unscrupulous businessman. Small, talkative, with the tanned skin of someone who spends many hours outdoors, his energy and enthusiasm are contagious as he uses words like “solidarity”, “trust” and “collaboration”. By his own account, personal change came about at the end of the ’90s, at the same time the soil was becoming exhausted and the economic boom of the region was coming to a halt. His family and 30 others from Guapiruvu joined forces with the NGO Vitae Civilis and created a local Agenda 21 action plan — an initiative from the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 under which sustainable development programs can be carried out at the global, national and local levels — which sketched out a sustainable development plan for the region for the coming years.The creation of the plan was a watershed. A neighborhood association and a co-op were created, strengthening community ties. Concerned about the environmental impacts that their farming practices were having on the land, Gilberto and seven other farmers turned to agroforestry. They contacted Ernst Götsch, the Swiss farmer and researcher often credited with introducing modern agroforestry to Brazil. Götsch taught them the basics of his model, which he calls “syntropic agriculture” and which is based on the principle of “going along with nature instead of against it,” creating conditions that mimic the natural events of ecological succession.Of the eight initial farmers, only two remain: Gilberto and his friend Geraldo Oliveira. But the effort paid off. Today, 20 years later, Geraldo’s land has the best soil in Guapiruvu: dark, deep and full of life. Beneath the canopy of banana trees and other plants, the temperature is a couple degrees lower than outside. And as we stand in silence, the sound of wildlife emerges. In less than a minute, Gilberto names seven or eight different bird species by their songs and calls.The soil in Geraldo’s agroforestry system is full of life, decomposing organic matter and enriching the soil. Image by Ignacio Amigo for MongabayGilberto’s own land is also richer today than it was 20 years ago. According to him, many animal species returned after he abandoned conventional farming. Walking through his field he points to different native trees and explains: “A bird planted it,” and sometimes, “A bat planted it.”The examples of Gilberto and Geraldo have encouraged others over the years. That’s the case with Dito, a farmer of few words and melancholic glances, who started his own agroforestry system three years ago. He says bad weeds don’t grow as much as they used to, and that he’s seen his profits increase, mainly because of the money he saves on chemicals and fertilizers.A major challenge remains finding channels for the other crops and fruits produced by the agroforestry systems. For the time being, everyone in Guapiruvu still relies for their living on banana and the heart of the palmito pupunha, or peach-palm tree (Bactris gasipaes). The co-op markets the conventional and organic produce separately: while conventional farmers are able to produce larger amounts, organic farmers can sell their produce at a 30 percent premium. In both cases, the main buyers are public entities, such as state and city governments, that use the produce for school meals or food banks.To Sidenei Carlos França, an agricultural engineer who works for the state of São Paulo, the experience in Guapiruvu has been important for the region.“We need to generate local knowledge in Brazil,” says França. “And Gilberto has a great merit for having acted as a guinea pig.”He has a good opinion about the work being done in Guapiruvu, but argues that agroforestry systems should include timber resources to be profitable in the long term. A passionate supporter of agro-ecology and an agroforestry farmer himself, França has little doubt that this is the way to go.Gilberto stares at a juçara palm tree (Euterpe edulis), an endangered tree from the Atlantic Forest, in his agroforestry system. Next to the juçara there’s a banana tree (Musa sp) and a “pé de ata” (Annona squamosa). Image by Ignacio Amigo for Mongabay“To me, agroforestry is the agriculture of the tropics,” he says. “Monoculture is the European model. Here, if you walk into the forest, you see hundreds of species in a square meter. We have to mimic nature in agriculture.”Local land reformOne of the problems cited in the Agenda 21 plan was that many farmers lacked sufficient farmland. For many years, locals occupied lots within a large property that didn’t have a clear owner. After years of conflict and evictions, in 2005 an agreement was reached with the INCRA, the National Institute for Colonization and Land Reform, through which the central government acquired the land and rented it for life to 61 farmers.This move was a boon for the region. The lack of economic alternatives was pushing people into the woods to poach juçara (Euterpe edulis), an endangered tree species of the Atlantic Forest prized for its heart of palm. The agreement gave these outlaws a legitimate way of earning a living.Dada used to log palmito illegally before he got a piece of land in Guapiruvu’s settlement. Image by Ignacio Amigo for MongabayOne of them is Dada, who is now thinking of dedicating part of his land for agroforestry. Originally from northeastern Brazil, the poorest region of the country, Dada moved to Guapiruvu with his father in 1982, at the age of 9. For years he worked for others, and, when work wasn’t available, poached juçara, even spending time in jail for it.A few weeks ago, Dada was cited by the Environmental Police after they detected, through satellite images, that he had illegally cut down a few trees within his land. He was issued a fine and the area was placed under embargo, so now he can’t use it. Dada’s intention now is to make the best of a bad situation. He wants to negotiate with the authorities to set that area aside for agroforestry in exchange for them lifting the embargo. This way, the trees he logged, which he hasn’t moved, could be put to a good use, as their decomposition will enrich the soil beneath.Dada’s conversion didn’t come overnight, but he now talks about solidarity, cooperation and becoming more environmentally sustainable, using many of Gilberto’s words. Guapiruvu will have to overcome many challenges in the years to come, but its residents seem to be on the right track. Because, as Gilberto put it, “Guapiruvu’s GDP might be lower today than a few years ago. But our wealth is more [evenly] distributed.” And agroforestry might just be part of the reason.This feature is part of a yearlong series on agroforestry worldwide, see the whole series here and view previous features that concern agroforestry here.Ingnacio Amigo lives in São Paulo, follow him on Twitter via @IgnacioAmigoH. Agriculture, Agroforestry, Amazon Rainforest, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Hotspots, Climate Change, Conservation Solutions, Endangered Species, Forests, Rainforests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Trump family planning policy may increase population, hurt women and environment

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer In January, U.S. President Donald Trump reinstated the global gag rule, first introduced under Ronald Reagan. It requires foreign NGOs receiving U.S. global family planning assistance to certify that they will not “perform or actively promote abortion as a method of family planning” with non-U.S. funds.According to Marie Stopes International (MSI), the gag rule could result in a minimum of 2.2 million abortions from 2017-2020, with 21,700 women dying as a result. And that only accounts for services lost from MSI.Research shows that the gag rule is also likely to increase population growth in the developing world by reducing the ability of organizations to provide family planning services. This could endanger the environment in a variety of ways. For example, population growth puts more pressure on forests and wildlife.A lack of family planning can lead to large families, with women spending more of their time on childrearing, largely leaving them out of any active role in community sustainability and conservation projects, as well as education programs that train them in sustainable livelihoods. The Katoyo Women’s Group in the Democratic Republic of Congo leads a procession through their village in proud celebration of International Women’s Day, 2017. The empowerment of women is good for communities and the environment, say researchers and activists. Photo courtesy of Gorilla Rehabilitation and Conservation Education CenterIn January, President Donald Trump re-instated the global gag rule with sweeping consequences for women’s health and the environment globally.President Ronald Reagan first introduced the rule — also known as the Mexico City Policy — in 1984. It requires foreign non-governmental organizations (NGOs) receiving U.S. global family planning assistance to certify they will not “perform or actively promote abortion as a method of family planning” with non-U.S. funds. The rule has been rescinded and re-instated multiple times, and has been an active policy for 17 of the past 32 years.According to Serra Sippel, president of the Center for Health and Gender Equity in Washington D.C., the Trump administration policy — which she says is “rolling out as we speak,” — has created confusion on the ground and funding cuts for many organizations. Two of the world’s largest family planning organizations, the International Planned Parenthood Foundation and Marie Stopes International (MSI), will be stripped of U.S. funds because they offer abortions in countries where it is legal to do so.A memo released by the U.S.-based Guttmacher Institute asserts that the gag rule increases unwanted pregnancies and back street abortions. And according to Marie Stopes International, the gag rule could result in 2.2 million abortions from 2017-2020, with 21,700 women dying as a result. And that only accounts for services lost from MSI — the effects of the policy could have far reaching consequences around the world.Aside from the potentially devastating consequences to women’s health and wellbeing, evidence also suggests that the global gag rule is bad news for the environment.Information technology training with women in the Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Bijoux Lolenge Mpako (far left) is a graduate of the Djolu Technical College and now serves as logistician and program manager for the reserve. While data is scant, logic suggests that less time spent on child rearing means more time for education. Photo courtesy of the Bonobo Conservation InitiativeThe population connectionRobert Engelman, senior fellow at the World Watch Institute, led a 2016 meta-study that examined findings from 939 scientific papers linking family planning and sustainability that appeared in peer-reviewed journals between 2005-2016. According to Engelman’s analysis, much of the literature demonstrated or asserted a connection between human population and environmental risk or degradation. And according to his report, population growth was often found to be more influential as a factor than climate change in current or projected environmental problems.“Logic and research suggest that growing populations tend to contribute to various environmental stresses,” researcher Vicky Markham asserts in an essay found within the 2016 report. “So, by extension, if wider use of family planning slows population growth, it should generally produce some benefits in slowing the pace of human-caused environmental change.”Engelman says the global gag rule is likely to increase population growth by reducing the ability of many organizations to provide family planning services. Based on the body of evidence, he says, this seems likely to put more pressure on the environment.History supports the idea that the global gag rule cuts off access to family planning for women around the world. According to the Human Rights Watch website, previous versions of the rule caused organizations around the planet to cut staff and services, and sometimes shut clinics. The NGOs that complied with the restrictions imposed by the rule were prevented from relaying full and accurate information to their patients, the site says.Mothers awaiting family planning services in Malawi. The loss of those services under the Trump gag rule could be devastating to communities around the world. Photo by Lindsay Mgbor/Department for International Development, Wikimedia CommonsGender equality and conservationIt’s not just the uptick in population that matters. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that empowered women, less encumbered by full time childrearing duties, are key to environmental conservation. For example, in studies of forestry groups in Nepal and India, researchers found that when more women were involved in forest restoration, there is more monitoring and better rule enforcement, so forest areas regenerate faster.“Craig Leisher (et al.) recently mapped all of the published literature linking gender to forest and fisheries management,” Kame Westerman of the NGO Conservation International said in a recent Mongabay interview. “While there is a dearth of published literature looking at this issue (quite a problem in its own right!), the researchers did highlight a number of studies demonstrating an increase in conservation outcomes (mostly forest cover) when decision-making bodies are of mixed gender.”In the Democratic Republic of Congo, four NGOs, the Bonobo Conservation Initiative, the Gorilla Rehabilitation and Conservation Education Center, the Jane Goodall Institute and Coopera all integrated women into their great ape conservation programs, with excellent outcomes — women played key roles as caregivers, in tree planting and habitat restoration.In India, empowered women have proven themselves decisive in saving the Greater Adjutant stork (Leptoptilos dubius). Researcher and conservationist Purnima Barman recruited the “Hargila Army,” a self-help group of 70 women, mostly recruited from families that own stork nest trees, and all with expert weaving skills. Assam is famous for its gamocha towels and other fine textiles, woven from cotton or silk and decorated with traditional motifs, such as flowers — now those goods are being emblazoned with Greater Adjutant storks, and those fabrics are becoming awareness building tools for the conservation effort around the globe. But all of these efforts are contingent on smaller families — where less time spent on childrearing means more time for conservation.Together with the Jatukik Providence Foundation, Bonobo Conservation Initiative and Vie Sauvage women in the Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve, DRC, were provided with training in soap making. Expanding and diversifying community livelihoods means less need to rely on wildlife trafficking or illegal logging for money. Photo courtesy of the Bonobo Conservation InitiativeWith smaller families, women also have more time available for education, which can result in enhanced participation in a community’s environmental activities and in developing new, sustainable livelihoods. Another finding by researchers: educated women tend to have smaller families, reducing stress on the environment.Engelman’s 2016 study summarizes these crucial relationships between family planning, population and the environment by quoting a 1992 joint statement made by 58 national academies of science from around the globe:Unlike many other steps that could be taken to reduce the rate of environmental changes, reductions in rates of population growth can be accomplished through voluntary measures. Surveys in the developing world repeatedly reveal large amounts of unwanted childbearing. By providing people with the means to control their own fertility, family planning programs have major possibilities to reduce rates of population growth and hence to arrest environmental degradation.Conversely, when women lose their ability to make health and family planning decisions for themselves — when rapidly growing families require an almost exclusive focus on childrearing — then women are forced into more submissive roles with little time for community participation or decision making. They become less likely to engage civically, politically and environmentally.According to the 2016 meta-study, several scientific papers indicated that greater gender equality and participation of women in governance and civil society can lead to positive environmental outcomes: “In the first step, family planning empowers women. In the second, women apply this empowerment to positive environmental outcomes.”In addition, an essay by Engelman suggests that women tend to have more concern about environmental problems than men do, and that in certain circumstances women are more likely to act on this concern.“If family planning opens up opportunities for women to participate more actively in their communities, in government, and in civil society, one might expect a greater demand — and maybe more activity — from them for policies and actions that protect the environment,” writes Engelman. “More research and harder evidence is needed for anything like certainty. What we have found nonetheless supports the benefit of family planning for environmental sustainability, based simply on what happens when women ‘stand on their own two feet and ring their own bells.’”So what happens when women lose this empowerment, when the gag rule results in the loss of family planning services?“You can certainly logically draw the conclusion that it’s not helping the situation,” says Engelman.Woman with a baby on her back in Laos. Photo courtesy of Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay. With only so many hours in the day, women who have many babies are more likely to be engaged in childrearing than they are to be involved in conservation programs. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayBroader health consequencesAccording to a 2006 report from Engender Health, Kenya’s leading reproductive health providers suffered serious budget cuts as a result of the Bush-era global gag rule, which caused eight clinic closures and staff layoffs across the country. The report also states that at least 9,000 people — primarily women and children — were left with little or no access to health care.Impacts are likely to be worse under the Trump version of the rule, which is more far reaching than ever. Trump’s gag rule has been expanded to include other global health assistance programs that support initiatives for HIV, maternal and child health — this is potentially catastrophic for millions of people as it could weaken important health systems that have been built up over decades in the developing world, says Sippel.Further, this gag order will be implemented in a world that is seeing new global health threats, such as the Zika virus — the spread and prevalence of which has been linked to climate change and knows no borders, according to Sippel. With the increase of global health crises linked to climate change, “we need health systems around the world at their strongest,” she says. But the gag order weakens health systems, likely meaning more Zika, more HIV and other disease, leading to weaker communities and families — societal structures that need to be strong to implement local conservation initiatives.As health services — including family planning — are denied, the resulting population pressure is likely to contribute to an acceleration in environmental problems, ranging from climate change, to illegal logging, deforestation and wildlife trafficking, as expanding families, hit by disease, seek to make money to afford expensive healthcare and to feed expanding families.Old woman with children in Laos. Large families have long provided a form of old age insurance in rural communities. But as those communities become more dependent on a modern cash economy, large families can become a drain on family finances. It’s theorized that the need to provide food and money for large families can in turn lead to pressure on the environment, including conversion of forests to croplands, overhunting, trafficking and logging. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayThe bottom lineEvidence suggests that cutting health and family planning services via the global gag rule could have potentially devastating effects for the environment. However, there is little in-depth data to quantify those impacts.“Certainly there is abundant evidence that when women and men have access to family planning, fertility rates fall and children are born later,” Engelman says. “That, according to the best evidence, is better for the environment. If you care about the environment, the last thing you’d want to do is restrict family planning for men and women.”Sippel, while also concerned about conservation, stresses the crucial importance of the health and wellbeing of women across the world, which is at stake.“The global gag rule is going to throw us backward and throw decades of progress out the window,” she says. “We fully expect that President Trump’s gag rule will cost women their lives and we can’t keep playing politics with women’s lives.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.African women having a discussion about progress within their community. Women freed from the obligation of caring for overly large families have more time to focus on social, economic and environmental programs that improve their communities. Photo courtesy of Mailabari, Wikimedia Commons. Adaptation To Climate Change, Climate Change, Conservation, Conservation And Poverty, Controversial, Diseases, Ecosystems, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Featured, Food, Food Crisis, food security, Foreign Aid, Global Environmental Crisis, Globalization, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Health, Overconsumption, Overpopulation, Population, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Public Health, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Miami exit spoils Dwyane Wade farewell as Detroit edge closer to playoff spot

first_imgRead Next Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Magic Johnson on abrupt resignation as Lakers chief: ‘I want to go back to having fun’ Charlotte need to beat Orlando on Wednesday and hope that Detroit slip up against the Knicks to leapfrog the Pistons into the postseason.Against Cleveland on Tuesday the Hornets were led by Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb with 23 points each.The Pistons recovered from a sluggish start which saw them trail by 22 points at one stage before recovering for the win.Ish Smith scored 22 points off the bench while Andre Drummond added 20 points and 17 rebounds to rescue Detroit.Blake Griffin was restricted to five points in 18 minutes.  Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade, right, hugs Derrick Jones Jr. after Wade’s final NBA basketball game, against the Philadelphia 76ers, Tuesday, April 9, 2019, in Miami. Wade is retiring. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)Dwyane Wade was given an emotional send-off in his final home game with the Miami Heat on Tuesday but results elsewhere eliminated the Florida team from playoff contention.The 37-year-old three-time NBA champion delivered a 30-point display as the Heat defeated the Philadelphia 76ers by 122-99 at the American Airlines Arena. ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES View comments P260,000 each in aid to displaced Marawi folk released by US MOST READ Sarah Geronimo’s ‘Tala’ enters Billboard’s world digital song sales chartcenter_img ‘Duterte legacy:’ Gov’t boasts achievements so far Comelec assures no disruption in operations with retirement of execs Wade, a 13-time NBA All-Star, was also honored with video tributes throughout his home finale, with former US President Barack Obama leading the plaudits.“D-Wade! Congratulations on a great run. Now, I know what you’re going through, because saying goodbye to a career that you love is never easy,” Obama said. “I’ve been there. In my case though, I didn’t really have a choice. My knees were shot so I had to give up basketball forever,” he joked. Detroit, meanwhile, can seal their playoff berth from the Eastern Conference with victory over the New York Knicks on Wednesday in the final round of regular season games.The Charlotte Hornets also have a slender chance of progression after demolishing the Cleveland Cavaliers 124-97.ADVERTISEMENT Sarah Geronimo’s ‘Tala’ enters Billboard’s world digital song sales chart Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Tim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’ Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. But the Detroit Pistons’ 100-93 victory over the Memphis Grizzlies ended Miami’s slender hopes of progressing to the playoffs.Wade gave a heartfelt salute to his fans in a pre-game ceremony in Miami.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubs“I love y’all, man,” Wade told the crowd. “I thank you guys for dancing with me this year. I thank y’all for your patience this year. I thank y’all for the love.“I’m thankful for this moment. I’m thankful for this entire season.”last_img read more

Show me respect! Hamilton hits back..after being compared to Jesus

first_imgIn that race, the Briton delivered a masterclass in the wet conditions in his Mercedes to win from 14th on the grid as many, including fellow four-time world champion Sebastian Vettel of Ferrari, slithered off the track.When he watched on television that evening, however, Hamilton was astonished by the lack of praise forthcoming from former F1 drivers, working as pundits, and explanations, as he raced to a success that leap-frogged him from eight points adrift to 17 ahead of Vettel in the championship.“I watched a race that felt so great in my heart on the track, but there were certain things that were not being perceived that way,” he said.“There was a point where I was three seconds a lap quicker than the other drivers. The difference that I was making in the car and the different lines I was choosing were not explained.”In his frustration, he made a critical post on Instagram, which he later took down.“I took the post down because it was (written) in the middle, or towards the end, and then there were good comments from some of the ex-drivers. They have a tough job to report what is going on in the race.”Meanwhile, 1997 world champion Jacques Villeneuve has made the bizarre claim that Hamilton appears to believe he is Jesus.“He confuses Formula One with Hollywood,” the Canadian racer, now a pundit with Sky Italia, told German magazine Auto Bild.“Everything he does is staged. He portrays himself on social media like he is Jesus“The way he knelt next to his car after his problem in qualifying (in Germany) looked like the suffering of Christ. And what he said afterwards was the Sermon on the Mount.“Then he gestured so dramatically on the podium that everyone could see who sent the sudden rain.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Chosen one?: Lewis Hamilton celebrates his German Grand Prix win last weekend © AFP/File / Christof STACHEBUDAPEST, Hungary, Jul 27 – Championship leader Lewis Hamilton came out fighting on Thursday after a week in which he accused his critics of being disrespectful and even found himself being compared to Jesus!Talking to reporters ahead of this weekend’s Hungarian Grand Prix, which he has won a record five times, the defending world champion suggested he sometimes deserves more praise, notably as demonstrated in last Sunday’s rain-hit German Grand Prix.last_img read more

Environmental groups concerned after feds release report on caribou habitat

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — A group of seven environmental organizations say they’re concerned after the federal Ministry of Environment released a report which found that provinces and territories are not doing enough to protect the habitat of the boreal caribou.The seven organizations, among which are the David Suzuki Foundation, the Wilderness Committee, and Greenpeace Canada, issued a statement today expressing their concerns about recent actions by provincial governments in Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec. The group is calling on all provinces and territories to stop expansion of the industrial footprint in boreal caribou ranges that have exceeded 35 percent disturbance, and to take immediate steps to protect critical habitat. “We expect provinces and territories to do this in partnership with Indigenous Peoples, fully respecting their knowledge and rights including the right to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC),” said the statement.- Advertisement -The group did however point out that positive steps have been taken by several First Nations and other communities, including two in B.C. Peace Region. The Fort Nelson First Nation’s Boreal Caribou Recovery Plan for their territory called the Medzih Action Plan, and the Doig River First Nation’s idenntification of priority areas for caribou habitat restoration based on Indigenous knowledge and science, were two positive examples mentioned by the group.The group added that it is calling on Environment Minister Catherine McKenna to fulfill her duties under SARA by continuing to issue timely section 63 reports for boreal caribou, to begin issuing them for other species, and also by issuing safety net orders for critical habitat that remains unprotected.last_img read more

Arsenal FC news: Danny Welbeck set to return this week

first_img Arsenal FC news: Danny Welbeck set to return with the under 21s this week Danny Welbeck is poised to play his first game of the season this Friday.The Arsenal striker has not featured since April last year due to a knee injury.But boss Arsene Wenger has earmarked this Friday’s under-21 training ground fixture against Brighton as the perfect way to ease the England forward back into competitive football.The French coach said after their goalless draw with Southampton on Tuesday night, that Welbeck’s return to fitness was a factor in him not signing a striker in the January transfer window.“In more positive news, Danny Welbeck is stepping up his rehabilitation,” Wenger wrote in his club programme notes bwfore the match.“We have to remember that he has not played since April 2015 and will need a game with the Under-21s, where we can monitor him and leave him free to play at his level of commitment. That looks to be very soon, maybe this week.”If Welbeck comes through unscathed he could be included in the squad for this Sunday’s must-win Premier League clash at Bournemouth. 1last_img read more

Charter campus to open soon

first_img “This is the fourth year in a row that we have had a balanced budget,” Al-Khatib said. Guidance’s Academic Performance Index score for 2005 was 689, up from 602 the prior year. The 87-point gain was one of the highest among schools in the Antelope Valley. “When you have people who care, it makes a big difference. The staff takes personal pride in every single kid that we have. It’s one-on-one class-size focus,” Al-Khatib said. Students earning Cs or lower are given tutoring, he said. Karen Maeshiro, (661) 267-5744 karen.maeshiro@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card The city of Palmdale also waived $39,000 in drainage and traffic-impact fees in exchange for the school providing after-school activities, such as basketball and cheerleading, Al-Khatib said. A gymnasium is planned when funding becomes available. Al-Khatib said he has been meeting with county officials and local state representatives to work on plans for a gym that would be a shared joint-use facility. The school, which opened in 2001, has an enrollment of 130 students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Al-Khatib announced the planned opening of the new campus at a press conference Wednesday, when he also discussed the school’s academic scores and financial status. An audit indicated the school ended the last fiscal year with a surplus of $109,666. PALMDALE – Guidance Charter School will move March 1 into its new $1 million campus being built on a vacant lot adjoining the Palmdale Boulevard mosque where the school now holds classes. The new school will contain 10 classrooms, a computer lab, a library and an administrative building with the principal’s office, teacher and staff lounge and nurse’s office. There will be two playground areas. “We are anticipating finishing at the end of February for a big grand opening,” said Kamal Al-Khatib, the school’s executive director and board president. The school, made up of modular buildings, is being financed through a variety of sources, including a $672,000 bank loan, a $100,000 loan from a private party, and a $30,000 loan from the American Islamic Institute of the Antelope Valley, which owns the property the school now uses. last_img read more

CONFIRMED: Leicester City complete club record signing of Islam Slimani

first_img Islam Slimani has completed his move to Leicester City Leicester have announced the signing of Algeria striker Islam Slimani from Sporting Lisbon.The Premier League champions released a statement on Wednesday with just over an hour and a half to go before the 11pm transfer deadline confirming Slimani had joined them on a five-year-deal, subject to international clearance.Sporting said the move was worth 30million euros (around £25.5million), potentially rising by another 3million euros (£4.2million) – which makes Slimani Leicester’s record signing. 1last_img

AgMedica approved for cannabis oil

first_imgAgMedica Bioscience Inc. recently received its licence to produce cannabis oil. (Handout) A Chatham-based cannabis producer has been approved to sell cannabis oil products.AgMedica Bioscience Inc. announced it received the go-ahead from Health Canada for a licence amendment effective May 31.The oil sales enable the company to provide medicinal patients and adult-use consumers with greater choice through a portfolio of bottled oils that includes CBD, THC and Balanced varieties, the company stated in a media release on Thursday. “With our oil sales licence now in hand and the potential to leverage the innovative Bio-Herbolysis extraction technology, AgMedica is ideally positioned to gain access to international markets for our products,” said Dr. Trevor Henry, AgMedica CEO, in the release.“I am proud of the continued success realized by AgMedica as we develop further differentiated products that positively contribute to the ongoing evolution of the cannabis sector.”The company stated receiving the oil sales licence represents “another key milestone in AgMedica’s path toward becoming a global leader in the development and commercialization of cannabis and cannabis-derived products designed to support client health and wellness.”Since late 2017, AgMedica has secured all regulatory approvals required to harvest and sell cannabis.Later this year, the company plans to implement larger-scale continuous processing equipment for its own products and potentially to meet the extraction needs of other licensed cannabis producers.tterfloth@postmedia.comTwitter.com/DailyNewsTTlast_img read more