Pink message rings true

first_imgBy DAVID NAGEL TAKING on board a Pink Ladies Day message from South East Football Netball League Operations Manager Liz…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Vale Paul Schreurs – F Grade cricketer, A Grade bloke

first_imgBy RUSSELL BENNETT THE local sporting community has once again been rocked by the loss of a champion human being…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

African Parks gets $65M for conservation in Rwanda and Malawi

first_imgAnimals, Conservation, Elephants, Happy-upbeat Environmental, In-situ Conservation, Lions, Parks, philanthropy, Protected Areas, Wildlife Article published by Rhett Butler African Parks will receive $65 million from the Wyss Foundation to bolster conservation efforts in Rwanda, Malawi, and beyond.The funds will go toward African Parks’ management of Liwonde National Park, Majete Wildlife Reserve and Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve in Malawi; Akagera National Park in Rwanda; and five still-to-be-identified protected areas in other countries.African Parks privately manages protected areas, effectively taking over operations traditionally managed by governments. African Parks, a South Africa-based organization that manages six million hectares across ten protected areas in seven African nations, will receive $65 million from the Wyss Foundation to bolster conservation efforts in Rwanda, Malawi, and beyond.According to statement released by Wyss, the funds will go toward African Parks’ management of Liwonde National Park, Majete Wildlife Reserve and Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve in Malawi; Akagera National Park in Rwanda; and five still-to-be-identified protected areas in other countries.“The Wyss Foundation is partnering with African Parks to safeguard more large wild landscapes in Africa from poaching and destruction,” said Hansjörg Wyss, Founder and Chairman of The Wyss Foundation, said in a press release. “African Parks has demonstrated success in cooperating with local leaders, communities and African nations in preserving ecosystems benefiting wildlife, while supporting local communities and populations. We are proud of our partnership with African Parks.”The donation builds on a 2015 grant from Wyss that enabled African Parks to reintroduce lions to Rwanda after they had been driven to extinction during the genocide of the mid-1990s. That lion population has since doubled. African Parks and Wyss are also collaborating on a massive translocation of animals to Malawi’s Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve.“Up to 500 elephants are currently being moved from two parks with a surplus (Liwonde and Majete) to a third park (Nkhotakota) that until recently had been heavily poached but has since been secured and is poised to be restocked and revived as Malawi’s premier elephant sanctuary,” the statement said. “In addition to these elephants, more than 1,000 head of other animals, including sable antelope, buffalo, waterbuck and impala have also been reintroduced to Nkhotakota, re-establishing viable founder populations, and helping to restore the health of the park.”A zebra in Akagera National Park, Rwanda, which is managed by African Parks. Photo by John Dickens/African Parks.African Parks is developing proposals for the other five new protected areas in Chad, Kenya, Mozambique and Benin that could receive support in the form of “challenge grants” if matching funds are raised. The group, which privately manages protected areas from top to bottom, says it is also in discussions with the Governments of Zimbabwe and Zambia as part of its goal to manage 20 parks by 2020.“Our vision is to protect 20 parks by 2020, bringing up to 10 million hectares of wilderness under our management,” said Peter Fearnhead, CEO of African Parks. “This historic gift, and the partnership forged with the Wyss Foundation, enables us to have a conservation impact at a scale which is globally significant.”center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Americans live increasingly far from forests — which is a problem for wildlife

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forest Fragmentation, Forest Loss, Forests, Research, Soil Carbon, Wildlife Giorgos Mountrakis and Sheng Yang of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry analyzed satellite-derived land cover data in order to look at geographic patterns of forest loss in the continental US during the 1990s.The average distance from any point in the U.S. to the nearest forest increased some 14 percent just between the years 1990 and 2000 — a difference of about one-third of a mile.They found that total forest cover loss across the country during that decade was close to 35,000 square miles (a little over 90,000 square kilometers), a decline of about 2.96 percent, or roughly an area the size of the state of Maine. Americans living in the continental United States looking to get out into nature have a longer drive ahead of them than they would have had in the early 20th Century. According to a new study, the average distance from any point in the U.S. to the nearest forest increased some 14 percent just between the years 1990 and 2000 — a difference of about one-third of a mile.That may not represent a major barrier to heading out on a nature hike, but it can make a real difference for wildlife and the overall health of ecosystems.Giorgos Mountrakis, an associate professor at the State University of New York’s (SUNY) College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, NY, and Sheng Yang, a graduate student at SUNY, analyzed satellite-derived land cover data in order to look at geographic patterns of forest loss in the continental US during the 1990s. They found that total forest cover loss across the country during that decade was close to 35,000 square miles (a little over 90,000 square kilometers), a decline of about 2.96 percent, or roughly an area the size of the state of Maine.“While we focused on forests, the implications of our results go beyond forestry,” Mountrakis said in a statement. The researchers detailed their findings in a study published in the journal PLOS ONE last month.The geographic pattern of the forest cover loss discovered by Mountrakis and Yang was perhaps their most surprising finding — as well as the most concerning, they said. The researchers determined that there were considerably higher levels of forest attrition (the complete removal of forest patches, as opposed to forest fragmentation, which is when smaller areas within a larger forest are cleared) in rural areas of the U.S. than in urban areas.“The public perceives the urbanized and private lands as more vulnerable,” said Mountrakis, “but that’s not what our study showed. Rural areas are at a higher risk of losing these forested patches.”Forest cover change (FCC) and forest attrition distance change (FADC) in level III ecoregions. While the southeastern US is experiencing high forest loss, the highest forest attrition is concentrated in other parts of the country. Credit: Yang S, Mountrakis G (2017).Even the loss of small forest patches can have a severe impact on wildlife and the healthy functioning of ecosystems, Mountrakis added, using bird migration as an example of an “ecoservice” supplied by forests that is compromised when forest patches are destroyed. “You can think of the forests as little islands that the birds are hopping from one to the next,” he said.The removal of key forest patches that connect larger forested areas can make it much more difficult for birds and other animals to move around, in other words — and they can’t simply hop in their car to overcome the increasing distance to the next forest. “There are numerous impacts of forest attrition including complete habitat losses, severe decline of population sizes and species richness, and shifts of local and regional environmental conditions,” Mountrakis and Yang write in the study.Mountrakis added that forest attrition can have serious impacts “for local climate, for biodiversity, for soil erosion. This is the major driver — we can link the loss of the isolated patches to all these environmental degradations.”All of which means these findings could have serious implications for conservation efforts. And Yang said that while the focus is often on conserving urban forests, “we may need to start paying more attention — let’s say for biodiversity reasons — in rural rather than urban areas. Because the urban forests tend to receive much more attention, they are better protected.”Few studies have examined the geographic pattern changes in forests other than fragmentation, Mountrakis and Yang note in the study, despite what such research can tell us about the biggest threats to forests. They found that forest attrition is higher in the western half of the U.S. than in the east, especially on lands owned by the federal or local government, pointing to the need for better public land management.“Forest losses are dominant in gap areas in western ecoregions leading to severe forest attritions, whereas in eastern regions forest losses appear in the interior or near the forest edge thus causing lower attrition,” the authors write in the study. They attribute this difference to a variety of factors, including lower tree density and higher terrain heterogeneity in the west, as well as the fact that forest fires and insects are more prevalent in the west while harvesting in managed forests is a more significant contributor to forest loss in the east.“[I]f you are in the western U.S. or you are in a rural area or you are in land owned by a public entity, it could be federal, state or local, your distance to the forest is increasing much faster than the other areas,” Yang said. “The forests are getting farther away from you. Distances to nearest forest are also increasing much faster in less forested landscapes. This indicates that the most spatially isolated — and therefore important — forests are the ones under the most pressure,” said Yang.Mountrakis and Yang argue that estimations of forest attrition can aid in conservation planning in a number of ways. It’s easier to project changes in climatic conditions like temperature and precipitation once forest attrition is estimated, for instance. “Estimating these climatic changes can lead to better understanding of potential impacts on genetic diversity of various species,” they write.“In addition, in order to promote carbon sequestration in forests and in turn mitigate climate changes, biomass and carbon changes from forest attrition need to be carefully evaluated to determine most profitable mitigation measures, for example reforestation, because forest attrition often causes irreversible carbon losses compared to other geographic patterns of forest loss.”SUNY graduate student Sheng Yang co-authored the study about changes in US forests. Photo Credit: Wendy P. Osborne, ESF.CITATIONYang, S., & Mountrakis, G. (2017). Forest dynamics in the US indicate disproportionate attrition in western forests, rural areas and public lands. PloS one, 12(2), e0171383. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0171383FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Kenya cracks down on illegal trade in rare and venomous vipers

first_imgArticle published by Rebecca Kessler Early this year Kenyan authorities placed tight new restrictions on the trade and export of several snake species, including the Kenya horned viper (Bitis worthingtoni) and the Mt. Kenya Bush Viper (Atheris desaixi).The two snake species are regularly trafficked abroad for the pet trade as well as for luxury food and medical reseach.Authorities say criminal networks regularly bribe officials and are investigating whether politicians may be involved in the trade.Nevertheless, the Kenyan government appears to be taking a hard line against viper traffic, cracking down on smugglers and ramping up international cooperation to fight viper traffic. Early this year Kenyan authorities tightened restrictions on the trade and export of several snake species, including two of the world’s deadliest vipers. The decision follows a resolution to list the two species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) at a meeting in South Africa last September and October.The species in question are the Kenya horned viper (Bitis worthingtoni) and the Mt. Kenya bush viper or Ashe’s viper (Atheris desaixi). The snakes have been finding their way to zoos and pet shops in Europe, the United States, Mexico, and China. The venom is also extracted for research on chronic diseases and drug development and to manufacture certain medicines.Kenyan police records show that the entertainment industry is also part of the problem. Circuses both domestically and abroad buy the vipers for stunt acts — a dangerous proposition as the venom kills within eight minutes of entering the bloodstream after a snakebite.Both species prefer cool weather and can only be found in the vicinity of Mt. Kenya, Africa’s second highest mountain, at altitudes above 1,200 meters where temperatures can seasonally dip below 32 degrees Fahrenheit.No recent census has been conducted to determine the numbers of either species in the wild but they are estimated to be in the thousands. Both species are thought to be in decline due to habitat destruction from logging and agricultural conversion, as well as the trade in live snakes. They have disappeared from many locales where they once were common.Kenya Horned Viper (Bitis worthingtoni). Photo courtesy of CITES.Viper trade restrictionAccording to Phillip Kisima, an officer with the national Kenya Police Service who has been investigating viper traffickers for many years, between 100 and 350 snakes have been smuggled out of the country each year since the early 1980s. A Kenyan snake catcher can sell each viper for around $100 to $150, but abroad the price can rise twelve-fold or more, according to Kisima.“The increasing level of corruption among many African countries continues to be an obstacle. So, [principles] and working together with those countries will be vital,” Kisima told Mongabay.At the CITES meeting, Kenya proposed to list both species under Appendix II of the convention, which includes species not currently threatened with extinction but that may become so if their trade is not regulated. The proposals were approved by all 182 participating member nations, according to Solomon Kyalo, head of Kenya’s CITES program.Kyalo told Mongabay that Kenya is now working with the other CITES members to monitor illegal trade across international borders.International trade in Appendix II species can only occur with an export permit from the relevant country’s authorities, and the separate restrictions on export of the two vipers that Kenya enacted soon after the CITES listing makes international trade in the two species illegal, except under certain limited circumstances, such as for medical research.Kyalo added that even the trade in viper eggs and body parts is now regulated and requires a government-issued permit to take place.“This means that if one has to trade the vipers, you need a permit” from the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) said Kyalo. “So far, no one has ever applied for a permit to farm them or even export them.”He added that both vipers should eventually be included in Appendix I, which is reserved for species threatened with extinction and permits trade only for non-commercial purposes, such as research.Mt. Kenya Bush Viper, aka Ashe’s Viper (Atheris desaixi). Photo courtesy of CITES.Bribery and murderHowever, Kisima the police officer doesn’t have much faith that the new restrictions on international trade will have much effect. “In a country riddled with corruption, the traffickers will find other means of trafficking the snakes. Only time will tell how successful the new regulations will be,” he said.Snake traders frequently bribe law enforcement officers, Kisima said. “They even threaten us with death. So sometimes our work becomes complicated especially when we refuse any cash proposals from them.”Kisima pointed to an incident last year in Nairobi, when viper smugglers killed two policemen. He said the case is still under investigation and the main suspect appears to be in hiding.“Bribing intelligence networks across borders is not a difficult task for the crooks as they are well connected and have international networks,” Kisima said.“They smuggle the young ones as they are not easily detected by machines at airports. They are then bred abroad for the pet trade,” he said.He added that the Kenya Police Service is investigating whether senior government officials are implicated in the viper trade as a means to fund their political campaigns.Andrew Musunda, a 50-year-old former viper smuggler, was released from prison last year. He told Mongabay that smuggling networks operate out of the prisons.“Some crimes are even committed by fellow prisoners while they are imprisoned. They work maliciously with some rogue law enforcers, including prison warders, whom they pay a small fee to make calls and do business transactions,” Musunda said.Today he volunteers with the police to track captured snakes and identify smugglers, and said he does not plan to go back to viper smuggling. “They have promised me permanent employment with time. I served 11 years in prison. Prison is not a place to be. It is like you are burning in hell,” Musunda said.A young captive Kenya sand boa (Gongylophis colubrinus), another species whose trade the Kenyan government recently restricted. Photo by Viki via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).CrackdownThe Kenyan government appears to be taking a hard line against viper traffic. Since January when the ban took effect, more than 38 smugglers have been arrested and arraigned in Kenyan courts. Twenty others have been arrested in China, the United Kingdom, Czech Republic, Germany, and France, according to Kenya Police Service records. An additional 40 are wanted for trafficking the rare snakes, as well as for drug trafficking offences.“This is just a fraction compared to those who are fugitives,” Kisima said. He added that Kenya has extradition treaties with most of the 182 CITES members and that it is creating a special unit of undercover officers who will target viper traffickers both domestically and abroad.Kisima also described a plan for the Kenya Police Service to work closely with Interpol to crack down on criminals and international gangs. And he said the government is forming a special taskforce on viper trafficking to be launched within a few months.“Special attention has been put to protect the vipers. This is because they are only found in Kenya,” Kisima said, adding that they are important components of the ecosystem, feeding on birds that destroy crops and rodents that are dangerous to humans.He compared the Kenyan government’s focus on the snakes to its focus on elephants. According to KWS, Kenya has about 27,000 elephants and the numbers are growing. Kisima attributes that to a crackdown on poaching the government initiated in 2011 and other measures, such as burning its stockpile of confiscated ivory to discourage poachers rather than selling it as other countries have done. KWS maintains that elephant poaching has declined since April 2016 when the country burned a big stockpile of ivory valued at over $100 million.“The taskforce will give the vipers [the] same treatment given to elephants,” Kisima said.But prosecuting the culprits may not be enough to save the vipers, he said. It will also be necessary to investigate some zoos as they do not have any CITES permits to breed the snakes.Paul Gathitu, a KWS spokesperson, said that demand for the two species, as well as for other viper species, is further fuelled by medical research, mostly in China.“The venom is also used in the manufacture of medicines used to treat high blood pressure, heart attacks, a few cases of pneumonia, and arthritis,” Gathitu told Mongabay. It can also be used to make drugs that counteract viper bites.“We can have good laws, good technology, but there remains serious loopholes. We cannot eliminate the problem in one day,” Gathitu said.Kensington Kiptanui, an animal rights advocate who recently founded an organization called Animal Consult based in the city of Nakuru, also pointed to China as a destination for trafficked species from around the world. There viper meat, including from the two Kenyan species, is sold as a delicacy in high-end restaurants, particularly in Hong Kong, he said.“There is great need for countries including Kenya to sign comprehensive agreements with China,” Kiptanui told Mongabay. “Chinese authorities need to increase surveillance in their borders.”Locally, the vipers are stolen from national parks and other protected areas and sold to witch doctors who use them ceremonially to direct bad luck at clients’ enemies, according to Kiptanui.“If you steal and sell the vipers to witch doctors, how can they be preserved?” Kiptanui asked.Sylvester Mueke is a 29-year-old former low-ranking viper trader. He told Mongabay he used to sneak into protected areas to catch the snakes. He would sell between two to 12 vipers per week, which, at $95 apiece, earned him good money.But Mueke said he cannot go back to the trade. He served two years in a Kenyan prison after he was convicted of trafficking Kenya horned vipers and Mt. Kenya Bush Vipers. He was released early because of good behavior and is serving a four-year probation sentence.Today he is deciding between an offer of a job as a community ranger and continuing as a partner in his father’s 230-acre crocodile farm in eastern Kenya, where he said business is booming.Mueke’s release was conditioned on his agreeing to work closely as a volunteer with police in tracking down viper smugglers. He doesn’t mind the work, and likes feeling useful.“There is still need to preserve the species,” he said. Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Cites, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Featured, Forests, Governance, Law Enforcement, Protected Areas, Snakes, Wildlife, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Monkey business: Building a global database of primate conservation studies (commentary)

first_imgWhile one primate — Homo sapiens — has flourished and spread across the planet, about 60 percent of non-human primate species are threatened with extinction. Conservation of these intelligent, complex creatures can be challenging on many levels.Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, together with researchers at the University of Cambridge (where I work), have just published the results of a three-year project gathering the data on how well primate conservation initiatives have worked to conserve species from lemurs to chimpanzees.The idea is simple: to present the current evidence for every intervention people might do to conserve primates, so that primate conservationists can learn from the best available data at the click of a mouse. This global database on primate conservation interventions is available to view for free.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Primates are our family. From tiny, delicate golden lion tamarins to impressively muscular gorillas, we are part of the same evolutionary lineage; a tree of life stretching back about 65 million years. But while one primate — Homo sapiens — has flourished and spread across the planet, about 60 percent of non-human primate species are threatened with extinction.Conservation of these intelligent, complex creatures can be challenging on many levels. We must work wisely towards finding the best solutions to the multi-faceted problems threatening their survival.Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, together with researchers at the University of Cambridge (where I work), have just published the results of a three-year project gathering the data on how well primate conservation initiatives have worked to conserve species from lemurs to chimpanzees. The ‘Primate Synopsis’ collects scientific papers and, where possible, NGO reports, testing conservation ‘interventions’ — actions that conservationists might undertake in order to have a favorable impact on these species.A bonnet macaque chews electrical wires in Valparai, India. Photo by Claire Wordley.A panel of 23 primate experts from around the world identified 162 interventions that could be implemented for primates, and the research team at Max Planck searched nearly 170 conservation journals and newsletters for studies testing them. They summarized all the papers in plain English, so that even conservationists without access to scientific journals can read the findings.The idea is simple: to present the current evidence for every intervention people might do to conserve primates, so that primate conservationists can learn from the best available data at the click of a mouse. This global database on primate conservation interventions is available to view for free, and a PDF of all the studies can be downloaded for use in areas without reliable internet access.So what works to conserve primates?The answer is understandably complicated, given the diversity of the group and the nature of conservation work. Non-human primates and humans conflict in many places on multiple levels. Non-human primates raid crops, chew cables, scatter garbage, steal food, and can become aggressive when they get used to being fed by people. Humans destroy primate habitats, kill primates with motor vehicles, and hunt them for food and pets. Furthermore, non-human primates are socially and psychologically complex creatures, whose responses to conservation efforts can be difficult to predict.An adult lion-tailed macaque with infant in Valparai, India. Photo by Claire Wordley.However, some patterns can be observed. Infrastructure such as roads, for example, can have devastating effects on primates. Primates crossing roads may be killed by vehicles, and food waste thrown from cars can lure primates towards areas where they are at risk of collision. Large roads can represent impenetrable barriers, preventing gene flow between primates living on each side of the road.Fortunately, there are some tantalizing hints at solutions: black lion tamarins and capuchins in Brazil have been seen using custom-built pole bridges to cross roads, and six species of lemurs in Madagascar used canopy bridges to cross roads and mining areas rather than walk on the roads below. Even better, a thirteen-year study in Belize found that black howler monkey numbers increased after the construction of pole bridges over man-made gaps, as one part of a wider conservation plan.Involving local human communities was also very successful in some studies, but exactly how best to involve them – or under which circumstances involving communities works best – needs more research. Of three studies testing how well it worked to involve local communities in primate research and conservation management, two saw successes – with black howler monkeys in Belize, and gorillas in Cameroon – while another, on mountain gorillas in several central African countries, saw gorillas decline despite a local environmental education program.Sitting pretty: Common langurs gaze at the Amer Fort near Jaipur, India, illustrating how closely human and non-human primates live in some parts of the world. Photo by Claire Wordley.Figuring out what makes the difference between success and failure is criticalWere external factors such as conflict part of the reason that mountain gorillas continued to decline in the central African study? Or was the environmental education program inherently less likely to work than the ‘Gorilla Guardian’ program in Cameroon, where local communities selected representatives to collect data on the gorillas? The current data do not allow us to do more than speculate, but hopefully they will encourage more primate conservationists to evaluate their work in order to answer these questions.Despite the failure of the gorilla environmental education program, multimedia campaigns to change behavior and promote positive attitudes towards primates have worked well in many places. Three studies found increased knowledge about primates in areas where multimedia campaigns, among other interventions, had been carried out; two studies found improved attitudes towards primates; one found a reduction in poaching; and three studies found increased numbers of primates. Clearly multimedia campaigns can be powerful — the next stages are to look at the messages, and messengers, that maximize the chances of success.What does the future hold? Juvenile vervet monkey. Photo by Ricardo RochaOther interventions had more variable results. Despite being one of the most commonly tested interventions, reintroducing groups of primates had unpredictable success rates. Some projects saw primate numbers boom, with high survival rates among the released animals, and rapid breeding; others saw the majority of released animals die. The reasons are not always obvious, as many projects seemed to be undertaking similar interventions, such as veterinary screenings of animals before release, acclimatizing the animals to the new area before releasing them, and providing supplementary food after release. Some species may simply be more suited to translocation or release from captivity than others — but there is a clear need to carefully test variations on how best to release animals, to give each project the best chance of success.For example, most gorillas (up to 85 percent) seemed to survive even over several years post-release, and to reproduce successfully. However, for vervet monkeys, survival ranged from 60 percent for six months post-release in one study, to 17 percent over 10 months post-release in another study. Are gorillas inherently more likely to survive translocation than vervet monkeys? Are the differences in survival between studies for vervet monkeys due to the landscape that they were released into, the rehabilitation and release process itself, or where the monkeys were sourced from? How could you develop the optimal method for reintroducing vervet monkeys to the wild? These questions and more will only be answerable with further studies, but gaining an overview of all the existing work will help guide the direction of key research.Which interventions urgently need more studies?Common langur near Jaipur, India. Photo by Claire Wordley.For 59 percent of interventions, the authors of the Primate synopsis were unable to find any studies that examined how well they worked. These are the areas where good experiments would add the most to primate conservation, and the full list can be seen on the online database. The authors note that more studies testing interventions are urgently needed for small, nocturnal species, and for primates in South America and Asia, as these species were under-represented in the global database of studies.As mining activities are increasing globally in primate habitats, the authors stress the need for innovation in ways to mitigate the effect of mining and energy production on primates and their habitats. These might include minimizing ground vibrations caused by open cast mining activities, establishing no-mining zones in/near watersheds so as to preserve water equilibrium, and using ‘set-asides’ for wildlife (primate) protection within mining areas.Research into ways to optimally engage with local communities in areas of primate habitat would also hugely benefit primate conservation. More studies on the effects of interventions to promote education and awareness-raising, and interventions that provide monetary or non-monetary benefits to local communities for sustainably managing their wildlife, would help to gauge the relative merits of each approach. Given the high level of conservation spending on community engagement of various kinds, it seems worthwhile dedicating five or 10 percent of primate conservation budgets to testing their efficacy.Lemur catta. Photo by Ricardo Rocha.One of the main problems when trying to test the effectiveness of interventions is that, typically, many interventions are conducted at once, making it hard to tell which ones were beneficial and which were not. While this reflects the reality of trying to undertake complex and urgent conservation projects, there are ways of isolating and testing interventions within bigger projects, such as staggering the times at which interventions are rolled out. The ‘PRISM’ toolkit can help practitioners on the ground to test interventions and it is available for free online. Tests of interventions can be published without publication fees in the Conservation Evidence journal, among other places.Many fascinating pieces of research have gone into creating this global database on primate conservation; with the continued hard work of primate conservationists, the next update of the database in a few years time should be even better, helping to make primate conservation more effective.Callitrix monkey, Kotu River, Gambia. Photo courtesy of Claire Wordley.Common squirrel monkey (Simia sciureus). Photo by Ricardo Rocha.CITATIONEstrada, A., Garber, P. A., Rylands, A. B., Roos, C., Fernandez-Duque, E., Di Fiore, A., … & Rovero, F. (2017). Impending extinction crisis of the world’s primates: Why primates matter. Science advances, 3(1), e1600946. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1600946Dr. Claire Wordley is a researcher with the Conservation Evidence group at the University of Cambridge. Her background includes working on the responses of tropical bats to forest fragmentation and agricultural activity. This led to an interest in researching how to make conservation change happen, and she now works at Conservation Evidence working with NGOs and government agencies to see how they can best use and produce scientific evidence.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Commentary, Conservation, Editorials, Environment, Lemurs, Mammals, Monkeys, Primates, Research, Researcher Perspective Series, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In Ellen Corkrum Case: Prosecution to Drop FIBank US$56,750 Theft Charge, But…

first_img“If the ongoing legal negotiation is resolved, then prosecution would drop criminal corruption charges against the First International Bank (FIB), because they have already paid back the US$56,750 transferred from the account of the Liberia Airport Authority (LAA), to Melvin Johnson and Associates in the United States,” Montserrado County Attorney Cllr. Daku Mulbah, disclosed last Friday.The bank was indicted in 2013 for allegedly conspiring with co-defendants Ellen Kwame Corkrum and Melvin Johnson and Associates to make an unauthorized transfer of funds in the tune of US$56,750 from the account of the Liberia Airport Authority (LAA), which Corkrum was managing director.The money was transferred to Melvin Johnson and Associates account#91806942, held at JP Morgan Chase Bank in the United States of America (USA).They were later charged with the commission of the crimes economic sabotage, theft of property, criminal conspiracy and misapplication of entrusted property by the government.Interestingly, the bank had admitted transferring the US$56,750 and had paid it back.Despite the payment, the charges are yet to be dropped against them.But, addressing journalists, at his Temple of Justice office, Cllr. Mulbah in his carefully crafted statement, said, they have been working out plan to drop the charges against the bank, adding, “there were still some legal issues that need to be addressed.”He did not mention the legal issues; instead he went on to say, “FIB was the first defendant that we were considering dropping charges against them, so that they would serve as one of our witnesses during the trial.”Recently, Cllr. Mulbah wrote Criminal Court ‘C’ to drop similar charges against another co-defendant, the Liberia Bank for Development and Investment (LBDI) to testify on their behalf, which request had been granted by the court.“We have dropped the criminal charges against LBDI and that could also happen in the case of FIB,” the Montserrado County Attorney disclosed.“We just need to resolve our negotiation before we can come out with the decision,” he emphasized.According to him, the bank’s management had admitted to the commission of the crimes of which they were indicted and had restituted the money that was withdrawn from the LAA’s account at the FIB. “What you need to know is that they had admitted their bank was used to transfer the money from the account of LAA to Melvin Johnson and Associates in the US.  Based on that, we can drop the charges and likely use them to help us prosecute the other defendants. But, we are still discussing,’ he reiterated.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

LAURIER HANDS BLUES LOSS

first_img Live Stats Preview The University of Toronto Varsity Blues men’s basketball team fell 83-50 to the Laurier Golden Hawks on Friday night (Nov. 9) in Waterloo, Ont.TORONTO STATS: Rookie guard Inaki Avarez led the Blues with 11 points, going 5-for-8 from the field, while adding three boards and two steals.Nicholas Morris added nine points for the Blues, going 7-for-9 from the free throw line.Laurier’s Ali Sow notched a game-high 32 points in the game, going 6-13 from beyond the arc. UP NEXT: The Blues are back in action tomorrow (Nov. 10) as they stay in Waterloo, Ont., to take on the Warriors. Tip off is set for 8 p.m.For more information, scores and highlights on your favourite U of T athletes and teams, please visit www.varsityblues.ca. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Instagram, SnapChat and Facebook for the latest and greatest in Varsity Blues intercollegiate athletics.Print Friendly Version Matchup Historycenter_img Next Game: at University of Waterloo 11/10/2018 | 8:00 p.m. Watch Live Full Schedule Roster last_img read more

CUT IN MOBILE ROAMING CHARGES WELCOME – PAT THE COPE

first_imgMEP Pat the Cope Gallagher has welcomed further efforts at an EU level to bring down the cost of mobile phone roaming charges.The move will affect many Donegal customers because of their close proximity to the border.Pat the Cope said today “Mobile and smart phone users can look forward to cheaper roaming costs from this summer as the European Parliament has finalised an agreement on the future of roaming for both the wholesale and the retail sector.” “Making a telephone call, sending a text message or consulting your emails whilst on holiday abroad in Europe will no longer cost a fortune.“The tariffs for mobile roaming within the European Union will substantially decrease in the next two years.”The new roaming charges will progressively go down and by July 2014, the aim is that roaming consumers will pay no more than 19 cents to make a call and 20 cents per megabyte of data.The cost of receiving a call will fall to 5 cents and sending a text to 6 cents. “Probably the most significant step forward for consumers in this Roaming regulation is the low cap on the roaming costs for data – from no caps on the costs per Megabyte so far to 0.70 EUR this summer and 0.20 EUR in 2014.”“From July this year, people will get a warning text message, email or pop-up window when they are nearing 50 Euros worth of data downloads.”The European Parliament will be voting on this decision in May and consumers travelling abroad can expect to receive lower bills from 01 July this year.”CUT IN MOBILE ROAMING CHARGES WELCOME – PAT THE COPE was last modified: March 29th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:MOBILE ROAMING CHARGESlast_img read more

Southampton 2-1 Inter Milan: Saints seal famous win to boost qualifying hopes

first_img Claude Puel’s side stay second in Group K after beating the Italian giants 1 Southampton took a significant step towards qualifying for the knockout stages of the Europa League after beating Inter Milan 2-1 at St Mary’s.Goals from Virgil van Dijk and an own goal from Yuto Nagatomo handed the Saints a famous win after Mauro Icardi had opened the scoring for the Italian giants.The result sees Southampton retain second place in Group K while also keeping Inter bottom of the group and four points behind the Premier League side.Inter took the lead on the half hour mark after Icardi took advantage of a series of fortunate deflections. Danilo D’Ambrosio barged past Van Dijk – causing both players to fall to the floor – before the ball eventually made its way to Icardi, who clinically found the bottom corner. The Saints had a chance to pull level just before the break as the referee awarded the home side a penalty. Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg struck the ball against the arm of Ivan Perisic to leave Dusan Tadic with the chance to equalise.But prior to the spot-kick being taken, Antonio Candreva took his anger out on the penalty spot before Sam McQueen felt the force of the Italian’s forearm – elbowing the fullback in the throat.Tadic finally took the penalty but Samir Handanovic saved the Serbian’s tame effort as the midfielder hit his shot down the middle of the goal.Claude Puel’s side equalised with 25 minutes left to play as Van Dijk bundled the ball into the net from a Saints corner. Oriol Romeu hit a half-volley that spiralled over Handanovic before hitting the crossbar, but Van Dijk reacted quickest to poke the ball home.And having levelled the scores to reclaim second spot in the group, an own goal from Nagatomo handed the home side a well-received gift.Tadic dribbled his way along the left flank before delivering a cross that was heavily deflected, but the ball bounced up horribly, leaving Nagatomo flat-footed and Handanovic helpless, handing Southampton a crucial lead.But Southampton nearly relinquished their advantage minutes later after handing Icardi possession 30-yards from goal. The Argentinean striker unleashed a fierce drive as he spun away from his marker, but Fraser Forster turned away the effort with his feet.Inter threatened again through Icardi but Eder’s cross proved to be a stretch too far for the striker as the ball sailed just over his head.Elsewhere in Group K, Sparta Prague beat Hapoel Be’er Sheva 2-0 to keep their place at the top of the standings.last_img read more