Nicholls Defeats McNeese State in Southland Soccer Tournament

first_imgBEAUMONT, Texas – In the first round match of the 2014 Southland Conference Soccer Tournament, No. 5 seed Nicholls defeated No. 4 seed McNeese State, 1-0, at Lamar Soccer Complex on the campus of Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas.At the end of the first half both teams took six shots, but McNeese State’s and Nicholls’ goalkeepers combined for eight saves to leave the two teams scoreless.Spencer Valdespino of Nicholls scored in the 71st minute of the second half for the lone goal of the game.The Cowgirls took two shots on goal in an attempt to tie the game, but came up short as time ran out.McNeese State completes the season with an 8-10-1 overall record while Nicholls improves to 10-9-0.Nicholls advances to the semifinals for and will face regular season champion and No. 1 seed Stephen F. Austin tomorrow at 7p.m. In the regular season matchup, the Ladyjacks won 3-1 in Thibodaux, La.  2014 Southland Soccer Tournament Post-Game QuotesMatch 1 – #4 McNeese State vs. #5 NichollsNicholls Head Coach Dylan HarrisonOn how the team competed tonight“We knew coming in that we were going to put in a good effort. We had a close game with them the first time we played them this year. It’s always tough to beat a good team twice I think and so the fact that they had already gotten us once this year just set up for us to go in and go at them and we got the result.”On what was going through your mind on the late second-half goal“Well we knew dealing with the conditions out here that the wind is pretty stiff, so we knew going in the first half if we kept it close we were going to have the wind in the second half. So we knew we were going to get some opportunities and it was a great goal.”Nicholls Forward Spencer ValdespinoOn the game-winning goal“Well at first I felt bad because I took it from my teammate. I thought she had a better run. I’m pretty sure I apologized during my shot but in total honesty I was really tired. I saw three players in front of me, I thought I’d just take a shot and see what it did. It wasn’t a clean shot, it did get tipped off of one of their feet. Just one of those nights, it goes in I guess.”On getting the win over the better seed, what kind of momentum does this give you“Extreme momentum. We came here last year and lost. Coming here and winning I think our mindset is completely different right now. We don’t really look into seeding that much, we just see our opponent and we want to win, that’s about it.”last_img read more

Rooney tells of Ferguson clashes in revealing TV programme

first_imgBy Steve TongueEngland captain Wayne Rooney has opened up about his clashes with Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson, how having children calmed him down and why he should not have gone to the 2006 World Cup for a new BBC television film.Rooney denies that he put in a transfer request just before Ferguson retired in May 2013 but admits that he broached the possibility of leaving the club he had joined from Everton nine years earlier.“I went in to see him and just said, ‘If you are not going to play me, it might be better for me to move on’,” Rooney said.“Then, all of a sudden, it was all over the press that I had put a transfer request in, which I never did.”Three years earlier Rooney did request a transfer and questioned the club’s ambition.“Wayne let himself down,” former team-mate Gary Neville told the programme of that incident. “Me and Ryan Giggs had a word and he apologised the next day.”Talking about his international career, the current England captain admits that he should not have agreed to go to the 2006 World Cup under Sven Goran Eriksson after breaking his foot.“It was touch-and-go as to whether I would be fit,” he said. “And then Sven put me in the squad.“Looking back, I probably would have sat out the World Cup. It was a big ask to get fit after six weeks out. I was never going to have that match sharpness.”His performances at two World Cups have been one of the disappointments of Rooney’s career, which he suggests may stem from “putting too much pressure on myself”.Insights into his personal life include an admission that “having children has calmed me down a bit” and that he was determined those children should be born in his native Liverpool rather than Manchester.Other contributors to the hour-long programme include Cristiano Ronaldo, Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Steven Gerrard, Frank Lampard and Ryan Giggs.It is presented by Gary Lineker, whose 48 goals for England have been beaten only by Bobby Charlton’s 49 and now Rooney’s 50.Rooney hopes to add to that total when England, who have already qualified for Euro 2016, play their remaining group matches in October, against Estonia and Lithuania.last_img read more

Halep survives after Davis epic

first_imgThe world No 1, who had won the pair’s only previous meeting at Indian Wells in 2013, has endured her travails in the opening week in Melbourne, she suffered an ankle injury in her first-round victory, but remains in with a chance of a maiden Grand Slam title.Halep, 26, served for the match on three separate occasions in the decider but was pushed all the way by her unseeded American opponent in a 4-6 6-4 15-13 victory, which lasted three hours and 44 minutes.”Definitely it was a very tough match. So long. I never played the third set so long,” said Halep, who will next Naomi Osaka after the Japanese player ended the hopes of Ashleigh Barty in straight sets.”I was very happy I could stay and win it. I’m almost dead but I’m happy we could show great tennis.”The match included 48 games, which ties the most for a women’s encounter in Australian Open history, as two of the most diminutive players on tour played out an epic.Despite falling a break behind in the opener, it was the 5ft 2in Davis who recovered well to claim the opener before Halep, at 5ft 6in, forced the decider.Halep served for the match at 5-4, 6-5 and 8-7 but was pegged back each time by the American, who showed immense belief, despite her inferior ranking, in cooler conditions at Melbourne Park after Friday’s extreme heat.Davis appeared set to pull off the shock of the opening week in the women’s draw when she brought up three match points on the Halep serve at 10-11 but the Romanian fought back from the brink.The 24-year-old American, forced to take an emergency medical time-out to treat a toenail injury later in the final set, saved 15 break points during the absorbing match but began to lose her ease of mobility at 13-13, before Halep served out at the fourth time of asking.The headline match on Saturday in the women’s draw saw two former champions in Melbourne collide on Rod Laver Arena and it was the 2016 champion Angelique Kerber who got the better of 2008 winner Maria Sharapova 6-1 6-3.Kerber, who came into the match in tremendous form after winning the warm-up event in Sydney, dominated the opening set – losing only three points behind her first serve as she took advantage of Sharapova’s inconsistent serve.Despite seeing an early break lead retrieved by her Russian opponent Kerber recovered to secure a second break of serve in the set before closing out the match in assured fashion to reach the last 16 where she will meet either Hsieh Su-Wei or Agnieszka Radwanska.Karolina Pliskova, also chasing her maiden Grand Slam title, won the all-Czech encounter against Lucie Safarova 7-6 (8-6) 7-5 in one hour and 37 minutes to reach the last 16.The world No 6 will face another compatriot in the last 16 after 20th seed Barbora Strycova defeated Johanna Konta’s conqueror Bernarda Pera 6-2 6-2.Caroline Garcia, the eighth seed, was forced the distance by Belarus’ Aliaksandra Sasnovich but proved too strong with a 6-3 5-7 6-2 success and will next meet American 17th seed Madison Keys.Keys, the US Open finalist last year, eased to a 6-3 6-4 win over Romania’s Ana Bogdan in ruthless fashion and is pleased with her progress through the draw ahead of a first meeting with her French counterpart.”I am always happy if I’m not the drama, and I feel like the U.S. Open I was the drama every night match that I played,” Keys said.”It’s a good position for me to be in and I’m enjoying it.”last_img read more

Cheetahs return to Malawi after decades

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasgupta The cheetahs have been moved into special enclosures called bomas for now, where the animals will learn to adapt to their new home under constant supervision.After spending some time in the bomas, the cheetahs will be released into the wider park.The cheetahs are the first large predator to be reintroduced into Liwonde National Park, and are said to be in good health. Cheetahs are back in Malawi after being extinct for nearly 20 years.On May 17, conservation non-profit African Parks, the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) and Malawi’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) flew four African cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) from South Africa and reintroduced them to Liwonde National Park in southern Malawi.The cheetahs have been moved into special enclosures called bomas for now, where the animals will learn to adapt to their new home under constant supervision. After spending some time in the bomas, the cheetahs will be released into the wider park, African Parks said in a statement. The animals are the first large predator to be reintroduced into Liwonde, and are said to be in good health.“The reintroduction of the cheetah is historic for the country and a new era for the park, where the return of large predators holds great optimism for the restoration of the natural system and the conservation of this highly vulnerable species,” Craig Reid, Liwonde National Park Manager, said in the statement.A Cheetah translocated from South Africa is offloaded from the aircraft before being safely transferred to the boma in Liwonde. Photo by African Parks / Frank Weitzer.A Cheetah is released into a boma at Liwonde National Park as part of the translocation to restore predators to the park. Photo by African Parks / Frank Weitzer.African Parks began managing Liwonde National Park in 2015 in partnership with the DNPW. The group claims to have enhanced law enforcement of the park, and made progress in improving the park’s habitat. Now, the habitat and prey conditions are “optimal” for the cheetahs and their conservation and protection, African Parks said.The cheetahs introduced to Liwonde National Park were sourced from various South African cheetah reserves by the EWT’s Cheetah Metapopulation Project. The project, launched in 2011, aims to protect the imperiled species by creating safe spaces and managing their populations in ways that ensure genetic diversity.“The reintroduction of the cheetah forms part of the collective vision of African Parks and the Malawian government to restore the country’s parks, rehabilitate wildlife populations, and increase tourism, creating highly-valued assets for the country and its people,” said African Parks.Cheetahs, currently listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, have disappeared from more than 90 percent of their historical range in Africa, and their populations continue to decline. Fewer than 6,700 mature cheetahs are estimated to survive in the wild today.In Malawi, cheetahs were reported in Kasungu National Park, Nyika National Park and Vwaza Wildlife Reserve until the late 1980s. These parks border Zambia, which was then thought to be the source of the cheetahs. But with increasing human population and the consequent loss of habitat and prey, cheetahs in Malawi were believed to have nearly become extinct by 1996.“Reintroduction to safe and fenced protected areas is one way to protect the future of the species on the continent” said EWT Cheetah Metapopulation Coordinator Vincent van der Merwe. “This collaborative undertaking represents a highly valuable opportunity for both the park [Liwonde] and cheetah conservation in light of the need for urgent action to address their decline”.One of the translocated cheetahs. Photo by African Parks / Frank Weitzer.center_img Animals, Biodiversity, Cheetahs, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Predators, Protected Areas, Reintroductions, Wildlife last_img read more

How the World Heritage Convention could save more wilderness: Q&A with World Heritage expert Cyril Kormos

first_imgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Since its inception in the 1970s, the UNESCO World Heritage Convention has officially recognized 1,052 sites of cultural or ecological importance around the planet.Making the list as a World Heritage site can help provide a location with increased protection and attention.The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), an advisor to the World Heritage Committee, released a study showing that 1.8 percent of wilderness areas are covered under World Heritage protection.The IUCN recommends a more methodical approach to the designation of World Heritage sites to help fill these gaps. The 41st session of the World Heritage Committee (WHC) is convening this week and next in Krakow, Poland, drawing participants from 21 member states, 170 observer nations and a multitude of NGOs. The July 2-12 conference aims to assess how conservation is faring at 154 UNESCO World Heritage sites, and consider the inclusion of 33 nominated sites.Since its inception in the 1970s, the UNESCO World Heritage Convention has officially recognized 1,052 sites of cultural or ecological importance around the planet. They include diverse locations, from the Sundarbans mangroves that straddle India and Bangladesh to the Minaret and Archaeological Remains of Jam in Afghanistan to Brazil’s Atlantic Forest South-East Reserves.Making the list as a World Heritage site can help provide a location with increased protection and attention. For instance, data from the University of Maryland show areas included in the Atlantic Forest South-East Reserves site experienced far less tree cover loss than land outside its bounds. Potential environmental threats to the Sundarbans from an upstream power plant currently under construction resulted in a visit by a UNESCO mission and a report urging the plant be relocated to a less ecologically sensitive area (however, this recommendation has not been heeded and plant construction is continuing).The Atlantic Forest once ringed much of Brazil’s coastline, but most of it has been cleared. Scientists estimate as little as 3.5 percent of the biome’s old-growth forest may remain today. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayThe potential environmental protection benefits of attaining World Heritage status is prompting the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to advocate for a big increase in UNESCO attention to more wilderness areas. The IUCN is an official advisor to UNESCO’s WHC, and conducts independent monitoring of World Heritage sites. In step with the conference, the IUCN released a study on how the World Heritage Convention can more effectively conserve remaining wilderness areas.The study describes the fast pace at which wilderness areas are disappearing, and how the Convention’s success at combining conservation with social equity and biological integrity is helping safeguard remaining wilderness areas and the ecological and human communities that depend on them.But while the authors laud what the Convention has done so far, they found that many important wilderness areas are currently excluded from UNESCO coverage. According to their study, 1.8 percent of the world’s total wilderness area has World Heritage protection. Of this, they write that two biomes – tropical and subtropical coniferous forests, and temperate grasslands, savannas and shrublands – have particularly low levels of protection, with less than 1 percent designated as World Heritage sites. Five other biomes are close behind, with less than 2 percent under UNESCO protection.Terrestrial wilderness as of 2009 and extent of World Heritage sites. From Kormos et al, 2017.In their study, the authors write that a more methodical approach to the designation of World Heritage sites could help fill these gaps. They provide two overarching recommendations for the WHC: assess existing sites to see if they’re large or connected enough to maintain integrity into the future, and invest in new sites to fill gaps in wilderness coverage.Mongabay caught up with study co-author Cyril Kormos, IUCN-WCPA Vice Chair for World Heritage and Vice President for Policy at the WILD Foundation, to ask him a few questions about how the World Heritage Convention could help improve wilderness conservation.How does wilderness protection fit into World Heritage? Kormos: The World Heritage Convention has always played a big role in helping to protect large, ecologically intact and iconic areas around the world, both on land and on sea. For example, the Kluane / Wrangell-St Elias / Glacier Bay / Tatshenshini-Alsek World Heritage site, a protected area complex shared by the United States and Canada, is almost 10m [million] hectares. Both the Central Amazon Conservation Complex and the Selous Game Reserve are over 5m hectares. Several marine sites are even bigger: for example, the Great Barrier Reef is almost 35m hectares and the Phoenix Islands Protected Area World Heritage site is about 41m hectares.Although there are only 238 natural and mixed World Heritage sites (the latter being recognized for both natural and cultural values) inscribed on the World Heritage List, this represents roughly 8% of the global protected areas estate and an area about the size of India (286m hectares). So the World Heritage Convention makes a very important contribution to wilderness conservation globally. But the World Heritage Convention could do even more by adopting an explicit and systematic wilderness and large landscapes and seascapes focus, and this new IUCN study explains how it could do so.How would extending the World Heritage Convention benefit wilderness and remaining intact areas?Kormos: Natural World Heritage sites are recognized by the international community as the planet’s most precious areas – places of importance to everyone and which we must all work collectively to safeguard for future generations. The World Heritage Convention provides an important added layer of international protection. The Convention emphasizes the importance of the good protection and management of World Heritage sites, and includes provisions for monitoring and reporting by governments, IUCN and UNESCO.  World Heritage status is also highly prestigious, raising the profile of a particular site and greatly enhancing awareness of its unique values. As a result of this increased prestige and awareness, it is often easier to raise funds for research and management of these sites and World Heritage status also helps drive tourism.Which regions are most in need of this protection?Kormos: This new report identifies some broad gaps in World Heritage coverage which may have potential for new World Heritage sites – from Amazonia to Central Asia to Southern Africa. But beyond this very broad scale gap analysis, there is potential for creating new large World Heritage sites with strong wilderness values around the world.Another crucial part of a strategy on World Heritage, wilderness and large landscapes and seascapes is also to expand existing World Heritage sites, and ensure they are adequately buffered and connected to other protected areas. So this is not just about [establishing] new sites – it’s also about enhancing wilderness values in existing sites and taking action to ensure they can be protected into the future.What about land occupied by Indigenous Peoples and local communities? What effects would expansion of the Convention have on them? Kormos: World Heritage nominations (proposals by governments to inscribe sites on the World Heritage List) and management of World Heritage sites must always fully respect the rights of local communities and Indigenous Peoples. In addition, World Heritage status and the commitment governments make to manage World Heritage sites to the highest international standards can also serve to recognize community and indigenous rights and can also help ensure community participation in the stewardship and governance of World Heritage sites.Many of the planet’s remaining large, intact landscapes and seascapes are the traditional lands of Indigenous Peoples and have remained in good condition precisely because of stewardship by indigenous cultures over centuries or millennia. Most indigenous cultures see no distinction between nature and culture and it is therefore more appropriate to understand these landscapes as biocultural landscapes. So a crucial goal is to make certain that a focus on wilderness and large landscapes and seascapes helps recognize rights and strengthens participation in management.Where would the financing for this increased protection come from?  Kormos: Unfortunately, the Convention itself does not have significant funding it can provide for management of World Heritage sites. However, World Heritage sites often receive additional resources, partly because of the requirements of the Convention that they be well-managed, and partly because they are of such importance to national governments – as a source of pride and as centers for tourism.Their unique values also attract research funding as well as international funding from bilateral donors and multilateral donors and from NGOs. Many World Heritage sites need additional funding – but World Heritage status can provide a significant boost in fundraising efforts.See https://www.iucn.org/theme/world-heritage for the IUCN’s recommendations to the World Heritage meeting currently being held in Krakow. Community-based Conservation, conservation players, Environment, Forest Loss, Grasslands, Habitat, Habitat Loss, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Interviews, Iucn, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Savannas, Temperate Forests, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wildlife, World Heritage Convention Article published by Morgan Erickson-Daviscenter_img Citations:Banner image of Sundarbans mangrove forest by user Bhushanfromindiasunderbanswidlife via Wikimedia Commons (CC 4.0)Cyril F. Kormos, Tim Badman, Tilman Jaeger, Bastian Bertzky, Remco van Merm, Elena Osipova, Yichuan Shi, Peter Bille Larsen (2017). World Heritage, Wilderness and Large Landscapes and Seascapes. Gland, Switzerland: IUCN. viii + 70pp. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Rhino horn confiscated, three alleged traffickers arrested in Sumatra

first_imgIndonesian authorities arrested three alleged wildlife traffickers and seized a rhino horn in Medan, North Sumatra on Aug. 13.Officials believe the horn comes from a Sumatran rhino, one of the world’s rarest and most endangered mammal species.The arrest followed a June 12 raid in a neighboring province that also resulted in the confiscation of a Sumatran rhino horn. Authorities have not yet determined whether there is a connection between the two incidents. Environmental law enforcement authorities in Indonesia’s Sumatra Island arrested three people on Aug. 13 in connection with the attempted sale of a rhino horn.A man identified by authorities as Suharto, a retired captain in the Indonesian Army’s special forces, was allegedly in possession of the horn at the time of his arrest in Medan, North Sumatra province’s capital city. Suharto’s wife was arrested with him, as was the alleged broker, identified as Herman.The confiscated horn was sent for forensic analysis to confirm its origin, but authorities suspect it came from a Critically Endangered Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis), Halasan Tulus, head of the environment ministry’s law enforcement agency in Sumatra, told Mongabay.A female rhino at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park. Seven rhinos live at the sanctuary, and an additional three live at a similar facility in Malaysian Borneo. The rest of the species lives in the wild in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Conservationists estimate that only 50-100 Sumatran rhinos still survive, mostly in small, isolated populations on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo. The smallest and furriest rhinoceros — and the sole surviving representatives of the genus Dicerorhinus — Sumatran rhinos are among the world’s most endangered mammals. They were driven to the brink of extinction last century by hunting and habitat loss, and conservationists now fear the remaining populations may be unable to breed quickly enough to allow the species to survive, even without additional pressure from poaching.Anti-poaching patrols in known rhino habitats are credited with curtailing poaching in Sumatra’s parks, but this was the second case in just over a month in which officials seized a rhino horn from alleged wildlife traffickers on the island. A July 12 raid in the South Aceh district resulted in one arrest as well as the confiscation of a Sumatran rhino horn and body parts of other endangered species.  It is not yet clear if the two cases are connected, Tulus said.The horn confiscated on Aug. 13 is around 15 centimeters tall and has a circumference of 36 centimeters. Tulus said officials had not yet determined whether the horn came from a rhino that died recently, but noted that it smelled due to the presence of flesh at its base.The horn confiscated by authorities on Aug. 13. Photo by Ayat Karokaro/Mongabay-Indonesia.According to Tulus, authorities launched an investigation after receiving a tip from a member of the public. “We discovered that they attempted to sell the rhino horn. But it’s not only that. There were also tiger skin and elephant ivory,” he said, noting that his agency worked the case alongside the Aceh and Jambi branches of the Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA).The arrests were made after investigators posed as buyers and set up a meeting in Medan. The detainees will be prosecuted for violating Indonesia’s 1990 Conservation Law, as well as a 1999 government regulation on the preservation of flora and fauna species.Tulus said the initial investigation suggests that a well-organized network was behind the intended rhino horn sale. “I see the operation as connected across provinces, and even across countries,” he told Mongabay. “This is still speculation, but in general, they’re operating in Malaysia and Hong Kong. We are smelling that there’s a connection.”Mongabay staff writer Hans Nicholas Jong and Mongabay-Indonesia correspondent Ayat Karokaro contributed to this report.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Megafauna, Poaching, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Isabel Estermancenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Grasberg mine’s riches still a distant glitter for Papuan communities

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Forestry, Forests, Gold Mining, Governance, Indonesia, Law, Law Enforcement, Mining, Pollution, Waste, Water Pollution Through its local subsidiary, US-based Freeport-McMoRan operates the world’s largest and most profitable gold mine in Indonesia’s Papua province.Changes to Indonesia’s mining laws earlier this year raised hopes that Papua’s indigenous people might finally get a stake in the mine.With negotiations between the government and the company snagging on key issues, activists say these hopes may be premature. High hopes that the world’s biggest gold mine will finally bring meaningful benefit to the community for which it has for decades been a source of contention have been deflated as negotiations hit a wall.Freeport McMoRan Inc. (FCX) and the Indonesian government are currently hashing out the details of a long-term agreement for an extension of the company’s contract to operate the giant Grasberg gold and copper mine in Papua province, due to expire in 2021.Freeport announced in August that it had agreed to divest a 51 percent stake in its Indonesian subsidiary, PT Freeport Indonesia (PTFI), in which it currently holds a 90.64 percent stake, following sustained pressure by the government to reform a mining sector long seen as not doing enough to benefit local communities or contribute to the national economy.As part of broader changes to Indonesia’s mining law, the government has required that all mining firms build smelters in-country; convert their existing contracts into more flexible permits; and, for those with a foreign majority shareholder, divest a 51 percent stake in their operations to local partners within a decade of the mines coming into production.Freeport’s announcement was cheered by Indonesians, many of whom believe the country has been getting the short end of the stick in its business dealings with foreign miners.The indigenous inhabitants of Papua, in particular, welcomed the announcement, hoping the redrawn contract would finally address the impact of the company’s mining operations on the local community and improve their welfare.But as negotiations between Freeport and the government stall over the terms of the divestment, the role Papuans will play in determining the future of the mining project is once again shrouded in uncertainty.A map of the Grasberg mine in Papua. Image by AK Rockefeller/flickr.Sharing the wealthIn 2016 alone, Freeport’s Indonesian operations generated $3.8 billion in revenue for the parent company. Yet despite having the world’s most profitable gold mine, Papua remains Indonesia’s poorest province, where 28 percent of the people live below the poverty line. It also has some of the worst infant mortality and literacy rates in Asia.To ensure that some of the mine’s revenues trickle down to Papuans, Energy and Mineral Resources Minister Ignasius Jonan has said that up to 10 percent of PTFI’s shares should be reserved for the Papuan government and indigenous Papuan people.But Freeport has balked at the details of the government’s plan to manage the divestment. In a letter dated Sept. 28, the company expressed strong disagreement with the valuation, timing and structure put forward by the government.The government has proposed acquiring a majority stake in PTFI by the end of 2018, but Freeport wants the divestment to take place in stages over a period of several years. It also wants the first batch of shares to be offered publicly through the stock exchange, rather than allocated directly to the government.The price is another sticking point. Last year Freeport offered to divest a 10.64 percent stake in PTFI for $1.7 billion, which would give a valuation of around $8.1 billion for a 51 percent stake. Jonan, however, has called for a much lower figure. Conflating FCX’s market capitalization on the New York Stock Exchange and its share of revenue from PTFI, the minister argues that the fair value for a 51 percent stake in the Indonesian operator should be $4 billion.Any hopes for immediate benefits as a result of the divestment, particularly the promised 10 percent stake for Papuans, have diminished as a result of the impasse.Maryati Abdullah, the national coordinator of mining sector watchdog Publish What You Pay Indonesia, said such disagreements should have been foreseen. “The contentions in the negotiation process were predictable. So any claims of victory after the divestment agreement [in August] were premature, given that there are still many details that haven’t been agreed upon,” she told Mongabay. “As long as there’s no written agreement, there’s a high chance that things could still change.”A woman from the Korowai tribe, who live in southeastern West Papua in the Indonesian Province of Papua. Photo by Mari/flickr.‘Our nature is damaged’Community leaders in Papua argue they should be involved in the ongoing negotiations, regardless of whether Papuans get a share in PTFI.A group representing various indigenous tribes affected by PTFI’s mining operation met with Jonan last month to discuss the issue.“We hope we will be involved in the negotiation of the details of the agreement and that a good deal will be given be to the local people,” said Odizeus Beanal, a representative of the Amungme tribe, whose highland home is where Grasberg is located. “Our hope in the future is for an agreement to be reached for indigenous people.”Also affected by PTFI’s operations are the Kamoro, a lowland people whose ancestral territory is the site of Freeport’s mining town of Timika. The Amungme and Kamoro have traditionally subsisted on sustainable agriculture, fishing and hunting. But the opening of the mine in 1967 disrupted their lives, stripping them of their rights to 100,000 hectares (247,100 acres) of their ancestral lands. They have been further displaced and marginalized by migrants from elsewhere across Indonesia drawn to the mining boomtown.Indonesia’s National Commission on Human Rights (Komnas HAM), a state-funded body, said earlier this year that PTFI had never compensated the Amungme and the Kamoro as the original stewards of the land where it operates. It characterized Freeport’s concession as a land grab.“The land that could be used to live on has been contaminated with chemicals,” Daniel Beanal, a Kamoro elder, told presidential staffers at a meeting earlier this year. “Our nature is damaged. The mountain is filled with holes. I’ve never received anything from Freeport.”Beanal argued it would be best for PTFI to cease operations, a call echoed by another Kamoro elder, Nicolaus Kanunggok.“Our aspiration is clear: to close and audit [PTFI] first. We’re not asking for a share, not even a single percent. Close the operation first, and then audit [them],” Kanunggok said.The giant Grasberg open-pit copper and gold mine in Indonesian Papua on the island of New Guinea. US-based mining giant Freeport McMoRan, which operates the mine, was also granted an exemption from the 1999 Forestry Law. Photo by Alfindra Primaldhi/Wikimedia CommonsAudit findingsA recent report by Indonesia’s Supreme Audit Agency (BPK) identified a wide range of irregularities in PTFI’s operations and its current contract.Eleven of the issues were attributed to weak management by the government, while 10 pointed to violations of regulations by PTFI. These include indications of reckless mining, and the dumping of mining waste into rivers, forests and the sea. An earlier review by the agency estimated the environmental damage from the company’s operations at 185 trillion rupiah ($13.7 billion).PTFI spokesman Riza Pratama said the company manages its waste in accordance with the terms set out in the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) approved by the government in 1997. “We are operating in accordance with our mining contract and [mining waste processing and disposal] has been regulated in it,” he told Mongabay.Noak Kapisa, the head of Papua’s environmental agency, said PTFI should pay for the environmental damage identified by the audit agency. “If the damage is done inside Freeport’s areas, then it has to fix it,” he told Mongabay. Kapisa also called on the government to revoke the company’s EIA, which is in the process of being renewed, if PTFI refuses to make amends for the environmental damage it has caused.The BPK also found that Freeport had used 4,536 hectares (11,208 acres) of protected forest area without obtaining the proper permits, costing the government $20 million in lost fees between 2008 and 2015.Riza declined to comment on this finding when asked by Mongabay.View from the Grasberg open-pit copper and gold mine in Indonesian Papua on the island of New Guinea. Photo by Richard Jones/flickr.Pitfalls and progressAs things stand, there is no guarantee of more environmentally sound mining operations once Freeport has relinquished a 51 percent stake in PTFI.That’s because Freeport has insisted on retaining operational control of its subsidiary until 2041, even if the government holds the majority of PTFI shares. Should the miner get its way, Indonesia would have no leverage in the deal, according to PWYP Indonesia advocacy manager Aryanto Nugroho.For instance, he argues, Freeport could refuse to pay dividends to the government by saying it needs the money to cover expenses like building a smelter, which it is required to do under the new mining law.“Even if the government held the majority of shares, if FCX still retained operation control, what could we do? So there are traps like that,” Nugroho told Mongabay.The government must ensure that Freeport pays all its obligations, including for environmental damage, before the divestment is done, says Henri Subagiyo, executive director of the Indonesian Center for Environmental Law (ICEL), an NGO.“If the obligations are paid before the takeover, there won’t be many problems. But if the obligations [are held over until] after the takeover, then who would bear the burden?” Subagiyo told Mongabay. “If the government has the majority of shares, then the government would have the obligations [to pay for the damage]. If Papuans get a stake, they would bear the risk as well.”Activists have urged the government to use the BPK’s findings as a basis in the negotiations with Freeport.“These problems have to be probed further and discussed during the renegotiation process of Freeport’s mining contract,” said PWYP Indonesia’s Abdullah. “Environmental problems are no less important than other problems in the renegotiation, which are mainly financial, such as tax, divestment and the obligation to build smelters in Indonesia.”President Joko Widodo has said the government is seeking a win-win solution as quickly as possible. But with neither side seeing eye to eye on the key issues, it remains unclear when the negotiations will conclude.Additional reporting by Basten Gokkon.Banner image: Panorama from high up at the Grasberg gold and copper mine in Indonesian Papua on the island of New Guinea. Photo by Richard Jones/flickr.center_img Article published by Hans Nicholas Jonglast_img read more

Back from China, Nets steer clear of controversy in remarks

first_imgLOOK: Taal Volcano island 2 days after eruption MOST READ Taal Volcano eruption: House to develop rehab plan for Batangas, Cavite, Laguna View comments A worker takes down a billboard advertising an NBA preseason basketball game on Thursday between the Los Angeles Lakers and Brooklyn Nets in Shanghai, China, Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. The NBA has postponed Wednesday’s scheduled media sessions in Shanghai for the Brooklyn Nets and Los Angeles Lakers, and it remains unclear if the teams will play in China this week as scheduled. (AP Photo)The Nets steered clear of any statements like those of LeBron James that could have further inflamed the situation. Players say they were not rattled by the turbulence they faced during their two exhibition games against the Los Angeles Lakers last week, which came as the NBA dealt with the fallout from Rockets general manager Daryl Morey’s now-deleted tweet in support of support for anti-government protesters in Hong Kong.Joe Harris was just in China last month for the Basketball World Cup and said this trip wasn’t much different.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAndray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai SottoSPORTSBig differenceSPORTSAlmazan status stays uncertain ahead of Game 4“To be honest, you know there’s a lot of stuff going on but the atmosphere was really very similar to what it was during the World Cup,” Harris said. “The fans were extremely passionate. They love the game. They still sold out both games, so take out everything that was actually going on it really felt like almost exactly the same.”It was hard to ignore everything, with Chinese and NBA officials canceling events and news conferences, and advertising and local television coverage for the games in Shanghai and Shenzhen removed. Daybreak as smoke, ash billows from Taal volcano PLAY LIST 01:04Daybreak as smoke, ash billows from Taal volcano01:05Poor visibility, nakaapekto sa maraming lugar sa Batangas03:028,000 pulis sa Region 4-A, tuloy ang trabaho03:57Phivolcs, nahihirapan sa komunikasyon sa Taal01:04Sold-out: Stores run out of face masks after Taal spews ash01:45Iran police shoot at those protesting plane shootdown Harris said one of his community events, a visit with children at a play area, still went on. So did the team functions planned by new owner Joe Tsai, the co-founder of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba.Tsai posted a lengthy letter to fans on Facebook following Morey’s tweet, which Harris said the owner encouraged the players to read. He was around the team during the week getting the know players and staff.He made a good impression with his dinners, which Harris indicated were even better than Gregg Popovich’s while playing for the U.S.“I mean Pop had a lot of good dinners and stuff planned when we were out there too,” Harris said, “but I’d say Joe Tsai is probably a little more familiar with some of the dining establishments in Shanghai and Shenzhen.” /gsgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Francis Kong, Jason Magbanua headline ‘The School for the Passionate, New Bold U 2020’ Andray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai Sotto LATEST STORIEScenter_img LOOK: Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Part 3 takes you straight to hell with a Music Video and First Look-Images “At the end of the day we’re human and we see those things, so we just tried to stick together as much as we could,” guard Caris LeVert said.The Nets who did speak to reporters — Kyrie Irving wasn’t among them — said they hadn’t seen Morey’s tweet and couldn’t recall when they learned of it. Both teams met with NBA Commissioner Adam Silver shortly after arriving, where Harris said the commissioner outlined what was happening.“It’s not like he was standing in front of everybody and making some, like, dramatic commentary,” Harris said. “He was basically describing what we already knew was going on.”Irving spoke up in the meeting, but Harris said those remarks were not political but rather related mostly to basketball.“It was more just focusing on trying to get ready for the games,” Harris said.ADVERTISEMENT No need to wear face masks in Metro Manila, says scientist NEW YORK – The Brooklyn Nets played well and ate great on their trip to China.That was the tenor of their comments Wednesday after their first practice back home, downplaying the impact the ongoing international tension between the NBA and China had on them.ADVERTISEMENT Unruffled feathers Taal Volcano’s lava fountain weakens, but Phivolcs says it’s not sign of slowing down Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Negros Occidental gov’t, church call for prayers for safety of Taal evacueeslast_img read more

GLDA acquiring barge to aid cattle farmers

first_imgCattle farmers along the Berbice River and in the intermediate savannahs are to benefit from the acquisition of a cattle barge to be procured by the Guyana Livestock Development Authority (GLDA).According to Deputy Chief Executive Officer (DCEO) of the GLDA, Dr Dwight Walrond, the barge for which tenders are currently being invited, will bring relief to the livestock authority and private livestock farmers alike.“When you look at the cost to transport one animal to the station or from the station to the road, I think this barge would assist us greatly (and) the farmers in the Berbice River and the intermediate savannahs, those livestock farmers to be specific,” Waldron said.The acquisition of the barge, which is being tendered for currently, is part of the GLDA’s budgeted $50 million capital programme for the current year. The DCEO told the Government Information Agency (GINA) that “This is in keeping with the revamping of the Ebini Research Station which begun last year.”As part of the GLDA’s efforts to revamp the Ebini Research Station, major works started last year with the guest houses being rehabilitated. Other works are also being done “We are focusing on pasture and other capital works and corrals for the pens for the cattle areas,” Waldrond said.The capital works include the acquisition of a bus equipped to aid in the Livestock Development Authority’s extension services to farmers.“Farmers would have complained in the past, and even with our own internal evaluation we realised the quality of service we were putting out there to farmers as extension is not one we were proud of. As such, we made a pitch to have a bus that is equipped fully to assist us with our extension. This bus is equipped with a projector, DVD player and generator so we can be out there with the farmers, use the farmer field school method and actually show (video) clips of what other farmers are doing whether within Guyana or in other countries,” Walrond explained.Walrond added that “Another one of the capital projects is the construction of a quarantine outpost. We have to strengthen our surveillance system so that will help us monitor animals and animal products moving in and out of Guyana.”The Authority has benefited from collaboration with the Pan-American Health Organisation, the Food and Agriculture Organisation and Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture for training and facilitating certain processes.last_img read more

What’s got your goat driving on our crowded roadways?

first_imgSo we all know that getting around Los Angeles can be downright rotten, but spending more than 623.7 million hours annually stuck in traffic has given many commuters plenty of time to think how they would improve the system. From building monorails to zinging bad drivers with hefty fines, ideas are flowing. So what do you have to say? What drives you crazy about traveling around Los Angeles and how could it be solved? Where should transit agencies spend their money and why? We want to publish your ideas in an upcoming column and build a conversation based on commuters’ needs. So this is your chance to sound off: Even more than the Monday-through-Friday commute, McGrath is frustrated by the 405 Freeway backup congestion on the weekends. Family get-togethers at his sister’s home in Culver City are scheduled to avoid the worst of the congestion. “Every time I ride on the 405, I think about the tunnel and how I could be in the tunnel right now,” said McGrath, 61. Harold Katz of West Los Angeles recommends that parking enforcement officers be trained in traffic control and assigned to every major intersection in the San Fernando Valley and the Westside. “If people know it’s going to cost them $300 to block an intersection, we will cure that little problem quickly,” said the 74-year-old. Patrick Carland, 82, of Valley Glen wants businesses to stagger employees’ work hours to eliminate the crush from a traditional 8-to-5 day. He also advocates monorails to serve the area, but is opposed to more subways. “You go to work at 6 a.m. I go in at 8 a.m.,” Carland said. “Other than build a monorail, I don’t know what we can do. Traffic is a stinking mess.” But David Schrank, a researcher at the Texas Transportation Institute, said Los Angeles is doing everything it can – given its financial and geographical constraints – to make transportation better for Angelenos. “They’re increasing public transportation. They’re still pouring concrete. They’re doing some of everything,” said Schrank. Send your ideas to the Daily News, c/o Sue Doyle, 21221 Oxnard St., Woodland Hills, 91367. Or email them to sue.doyle@dailynews.com. Or write our blog at www.insidesocal.com/theride.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Here’s what transportation experts and local motorists have to say: Panos Prevedouros, a professor of transportation engineering at the University of Hawaii-Manoa, said Los Angeles needs more freeway lanes to serve the “autopolis”. “Maybe California was the freeway capital of the nation at one time, but now there are too few roads for the people who live there,” he said. In fact Los Angeles and San Diego have 2.2 lanes for every 1,000 people, ranking just above Hawaii for having the nation’s tightest roadways. One of the best places to drive is Houston, where there are 6.1 lanes for every 1,000 people. Jack McGrath of Valley Village says it’s time to build a tunnel through the Santa Monica Mountains, from Victory Boulevard to at least Wilshire, and charge motorists a toll to use it. last_img read more