Chelsea hit Arsenal for six, Liverpool and City win big

first_imgBy Toby DavisChelsea ripped apart Premier League title rivals Arsenal in a 6-0 mauling at Stamford Bridge on Saturday to ensure Arsene Wenger’s 1,000th game turned sour and Liverpool and Manchester City kept up the pressure with big wins.Yaya Toure scored a hat-trick including two penalties as City wrapped up a punishing 5-0 win over bottom club Fulham and Luis Suarez’s prolific run continued with three goals as Liverpool twice came from behind to thrash Cardiff City 6-3.The goals were spread about for Chelsea as Samuel Eto’o, Andre Schuerrle, Eden Hazard, Oscar (2) and Mohamed Salah were on target for the leaders in a match likely to be remembered for a bizarre refereeing blunder as much as Chelsea’s cut and thrust.Official Andre Marriner flashed a red card at Arsenal’s Kieran Gibbs for a handball on the goalline by Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain.The sending-off did little to affect the destination of the points, however, as Arsenal were already 2-0 down when Gibbs was dismissed and Hazard stepped up to convert the resulting penalty to make it 3-0 after just 17 minutes.Chelsea stayed four points clear of Liverpool in second, the Londoners having played a game more, with Manchester City six adrift of Chelsea in third but with three games in hand. Arsenal slipped to fourth.Everton moved up to fifth with a 3-2 win over struggling Swansea City and Norwich City improved their chances of avoiding the drop by beating relegation rivals Sunderland 2-0, their second a stunning volley from Alex Tettey.West Bromwich Albion lost 2-0 at Hull City and Newcastle United’s Papiss Cisse scored in stoppage time to inflict a painful 1-0 defeat on Crystal Palace.last_img read more

‘He knows where he is,’ says Zidane after benching Bale

first_imgReal Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane said on Friday there is no issue between him and Gareth Bale after he left the Welsh forward out of the starting line-up for both of his side’s Champions League last-16 games against Paris St Germain.Bale’s last two seasons with Spain have been blighted by injuries and while previously the club’s record signing was seen as undroppable, his presence in the Madrid starting line-up is no longer guaranteed, especially for the biggest games.“It’s not a problem. He knows where he is. He’s an important player and there are other players in the team that are also important,” Zidane told a news conference ahead of his side’s Liga game away to Eibar on Saturday.Bale came on as a substitute in both games against PSG. But his negative body language has been heavily scrutinised by the Spanish press, who have pointed out he was yawning while on the bench in the first leg and did not participate in the team’s celebrations on the pitch after the 3-1 win.Bale struck an eight Liga goal of the season by opening the scoring in Real’s 3-1 win over Getafe on Saturday, though his half-hearted celebration was also seen as a sign of his discontent at being dropped from the starting 11.Zidane played down any talk of a stand-off between him and Bale, saying the 100-million-euro forward understands the intense competition for places on the 12-time European champions.“He doesn’t need to do anything else. He’s at a team where there are many players and many games,” added the French coach.“He came onto the pitch (in Paris). I have nothing against him. He’s fundamental for us and I’m going to count on him until the end of the season. I have to pick a team every three days and that’s what I do.”Real are third in the Liga standings, trailing Liga leaders Barcelona by a remarkable 15 points in the standings and seven behind city rivals Atletico.last_img read more

Watch: $8 million worth elephant ivory crushed in New York City

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta The ivory, weighing nearly two tons, is believed to represent more than 100 slaughtered elephants.By destroying the illegally obtained ivory, authorities hope to send a message to poachers, traffickers and dealers that the slaughter of elephants will not be tolerated.All of the ivory that was crushed on Thursday came from seizures over the past three years, mostly from New York City. Hundreds of pieces of jewelry, sculptures and vases made of elephant ivory were destroyed at New York City’s Central Park on Thursday. The ivory, weighing nearly two tons, is estimated to be worth $8 million and is believed to represent more than 100 slaughtered elephants.The ivory crush was organized by the New York State’s Department of Environmental Conservation (NYDEC) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and supported by luxury jewelry retailer Tiffany & Co. By destroying the illegally obtained ivory, authorities hope to send a message to poachers, traffickers and dealers that the slaughter of elephants will not be tolerated.“The crushing sounds inside Central Park today equal justice for elephants,” John Calvelli, Executive Vice President of Public Affairs of WCS and Director of the 96 Elephants Campaign, said in a statement. “The crusher pulverized more than 2 tons of elephant ivory, ensuring that this ivory will never again bring profit to the criminals killing off the world’s elephants.” In 2014, New York became one of the first states in the U.S. to ban the sale or trade of items made from elephant and mammoth ivory and rhinoceros horns, limiting the trade to some products, such as those demonstrated to be at least 100 years old or those containing very small amounts of ivory.Several other states followed suit and enacted their own ivory bans, and in 2016, the U.S. government enforced a “near-total ban” on the commercial trade of elephant ivory.All of the ivory that was crushed on Thursday came from seizures over the past three years, mostly from New York City. In 2015, for instance, state authorities busted two sellers on 57th St. in Midtown Manhattan with $4.5 million worth of ivory items. The brothers, Irving Morano and Samuel Morano pleaded guilty in July this year, and the confiscated ivory was part of Thursday’s ivory crush.An estimated 30,000 African elephants are killed for the illegal ivory trade every year, mostly fuelled by demand from China, according to a 2010 report by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The U.S. is also a big ivory market, with Washington D.C. emerging as the new hub of ivory trade in the country, an investigation by TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring group, found recently.“Today’s event demonstrates that New York has zero tolerance for the sale of illegal ivory and other forms of wildlife crime,” Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr. said. “My office and our partners at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the Wildlife Conservation Society are committed to doing everything we can locally to protect this species and end poaching once and for all.”Nearly 2 tons of ivory was crushed in New York City’s Central Park on Thursday. Photo by Eric Januszkiewicz.The ivory included hundreds of pieces of jewelry, sculptures, and vases. Photo by Eric Januszkiewicz.By destroying the ivory, authorities hope to send a strong message to poachers that the illegal trade of ivory will not be tolerated. Photo by Julie Larsen Maher/WCSFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow Shreya Dasgupta on Twitter: @ShreyaDasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Conservation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Forest Elephants, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Mammals, Poaching, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

Local approaches to conservation may be the most effective, study finds

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Banner image by Rhett A. Butler/MongabayFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Community-based Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Habitat Degradation, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Rights, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Research, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Researchers compared deforestation and forest degradation rates in areas of the Peruvian Amazon that were unprotected to those protected through government and local management.They found, on average, locally led conservation initiatives proved more successful in preserving forests than those that are government-managed.The study adds to mounting evidence that letting local and indigenous communities officially manage their forests may often be a highly effective way to conserve them.However, official recognition of land rights often stands in the way of community-based conservation initiatives. The researchers urge the process be simplified so that more indigenous territories can be established and managed by the people who live in them. Research has shown community-managed protected areas are often more effectively conserved than protected areas run by outsiders. A new study, published this week in Scientific Reports, a journal by Nature, adds more fodder to this argument, finding conservation initiatives in Peru led by local communities and indigenous groups tend to be as or more effective as those led by the government.The study was conducted by researchers from universities in the UK and the Peruvian Ministry of Environment. Using satellite imagery and environmental and socio-economic data, they looked at different approaches to conservation enacted in the Peruvian Amazon between 2006 and 2011, comparing them to each other as well as to non-protected areas.They found that, on average, there was less deforestation and forest degradation in community-managed protected areas than in those managed by the government.“Our analysis shows that local stewardship of the forest can be very effective at curtailing forest degradation and conversion in the Peruvian Amazon,” said lead author Judith Schleicher, from the University of Cambridge.While the reasons behind the general success of local conservation initiatives haven’t been studied much in-depth, some researchers speculate that giving communities official management control over their land may increase regulatory pressure. Others say it’s because communities have a vested interest in sustainably managing the forests on which they depend.Overall, the findings of Schleicher and her colleagues indicate that all protected areas, regardless of who’s governing them, preserved forest cover better than non-protected areas. However, the study also found that the efficacy of conservation initiatives varied considerably depending on what kind of unprotected land they were compared to. For instance, logging concessions generally showed less forest loss and degradation than mining concessions.“Mining concessions experienced the highest proportion of deforestation and forest degradation of all land use designations assessed, as might be expected in light of the recent surge in highly destructive gold mining exploitation in the southern Peruvian Amazon,” the authors write.Mining, like this massive gold mine, has caused significant environmental damage in Peru. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Schleicher urges policy makers to “focus on a more diverse set of mechanisms for protecting the rapidly disappearing tropical forests.”Her recommendation was echoed by co-author Carlos Peres from the University of East Anglia: “Our analysis shows that there is no single way of protecting tropical forests, and multiple approaches are required to stem the relentless tide of forest conversion and degradation.”As part of diversifying protection mechanisms, Schleicher urges an uptick in focus on locally managed conservation projects.“Local conservation initiatives deserve more political, financial and legal support than they currently receive,” she said.Previous research, published earlier this year in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), found one way to increase the abilities of local communities to protect forest – recognize their land rights.The study, conducted in Peru by researchers at with U.S.-based Resources for the Future, the Inter-American Development Bank and the Carnegie Institution for Science, found granting land titles to local and indigenous communities correlated with improved forest preservation. The team found deforestation and forest degradation were respectively reduced by around 75 and 67 percent in the two years after an indigenous community was granted formal title to their traditional lands.“Granting indigenous and other local communities formal title to the forests that have traditionally sustained them is probably the most important trend in tropical forest policy over the past 30 years,” lead author Allen Blackman, a researcher with Resources for the Future, said in a statement. “These local communities now manage almost a third of all forests in developing countries, over twice the share currently found in government-run protected areas.”Land tenure data show about 56 percent of Peru’s land area is held or used by indigenous communities. However, research indicates the government acknowledges just over half of this. In their Scientific Reports study, Schleicher and her co-authors write that several political obstacles current exist that make it difficult for indigenous communities to achieve official land rights.They urge governing authorities to address these obstacles and make it easier for local communities to establish and manage their own conservation initiatives.“These include (i) reducing the complexity and length of the application processes, which often take several years to complete and (ii) adding to the very few [Indigenous Territories] that have been granted to indigenous communities during the last decade,” the authors write.“This is particularly important in light of the widespread political interests to resist or reverse the decentralization and devolution of the control over forests and other natural resources.”last_img read more

How unhealthy is the haze from Indonesia’s annual peat fires?

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Banner image: Schoolboys in Kuala Lumpur wear facemasks during a haze event in 2012. Smoke from annual peatland fires in Indonesia often blankets neighboring countries, too, with Singapore and Malaysia among the most affected. Photo by Firdaus Latif/Wikimedia Commons Indonesia’s vast peat swamp zones have been widely drained and dried for agriculture, rendering them highly flammable, and they often burn on a massive scale, blanketing the country and its neighbors in smoke.A recent survey on perceptions of the fires showed that while different groups have varying levels of concern about forest loss or carbon emissions, everyone agrees that protecting public health is a top priority.However, the first step to solving a problem is to agree on how critical the issue is. Susilo sat attached to an oxygen tank instead of tending his vegetables. The 62-year-old farmer, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, had a long history of respiratory trouble, but during the 2015 fire and haze crisis things got worse. As the landscape smoldered around his village in western Borneo, his attacks came so frequently that he could hardly work. This was his 37th visit to a local clinic for the life-saving treatment of a simple nebulizer.Indonesia’s vast peat swamp zones have been widely drained and dried for agriculture, rendering them highly flammable, and they often burn on a massive scale, blanketing the country and its neighbors in smoke. A recent survey on perceptions of the fires showed that while different groups – from small farmers to industrial agriculturists to people at all scales of government – have varying levels of concern about forest loss or carbon emissions, everyone agrees that protecting public health is a top priority. However, the first step to solving a problem is to agree on how critical the issue is.Art by Prabha Mallya for Mongabay.A peatland planted with oil palm burns on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra in 2015. Layers of peat, a decomposing, organic material, can stretch deep below the surface, and fires often spread underground. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Two independent studies have estimated that the 2015 Southeast Asian haze crisis caused somewhere between 11,880 and 100,300 premature deaths. However, because these estimates were based on remote sensing and models – and not “hard data” – they were roundly rejected by the governments of Indonesia and Malaysia. There, officials maintain, only 24 Indonesian and zero Malaysian deaths can directly be attributed to the 2015 haze. The rest of the health issues, they have claimed, were just temporary respiratory irritations that cleared up when the haze lifted.Nailing down how severely the fires affect health has been notoriously difficult. Accurate numbers for hospital admissions and mortality are not freely available, or in many cases are nonexistent. In addition, academic research has tended to focus on environmental conservation and carbon emissions rather than public health, leaving a data gap in our understanding. As a result, different models based on solid, but varying, assumptions can provide different conclusions, which can lead people to cherrypick results based on their agenda – or reject them all outright.However, while some study results may contradict one another, the body of science as a whole is less hazy on the conclusions: smoke from uncontrolled fires is a deadly threat to Southeast Asia whose victims number in the thousands, not dozens.A portrait of a little girl, Hanum, who died from a respiratory infection during the 2015 haze crisis hangs in the family home. Last year, her father testified in a citizen lawsuit against the police’s closing of cases against 15 plantation companies alleged to be complicit in the disaster. Photo by Made Ali.Toxic cloudsWhile emissions from burning peatlands are less well-studied than other types, recent research has shown that they contain potent carcinogens and over 90 different gases, some of which are highly toxic. Among those, formaldehyde, acrolein, benzene, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide are the most concerning, given their negative health effects in even relatively small doses. As such, the World Health Organization (WHO) and most other regulatory agencies have established recommendations for safe exposure levels to these chemicals – levels that are regularly exceeded by peat smoke and resultant haze, as shown by a comprehensive 2016 meta-analysis of 375 fire and health studies published between 1970-2014 from different fuel types around the world.Formaldehyde and acrolein are both known carcinogens, while benzene, a potent organic compound, can negatively affect the blood, brain and immune systems. Firefighter exposure to formaldehyde at prescribed burns in the U.S. has been recorded as high as 3,700 percent of the recommended maximum, and measurements of peat fire production of the gas have lead researchers to caution that exposure to the local population will likely exceed recommended levels.A satellite image taken at the height of the 2015 haze crisis shows the international extent of the disaster. Large oil palm and timber plantation companies are the biggest culprits when it comes to the peatland drainage that underlies the crisis. Many of the firms are owned by a small group of Southeast Asian billionaires. NASA image by Adam Voiland (NASA Earth Observatory) and Jeff Schmaltz (LANCE MODIS Rapid Response).Carbon monoxide (CO) is a highly toxic blood poison that binds with hemoglobin, preventing effective oxygen uptake. The amount of CO a fire produces varies widely, and although it readily dissipates in the atmosphere, acute exposure at the source can have deadly consequences. While most studies find exposure levels from forest fires to be below regulatory guidelines, the slow smoldering nature of peat can produce high levels of CO not typically seen from other fires. In 2015, outdoor levels of CO in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo, were measured at 3-6 times higher than what the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) considers dangerous. Further, CO can linger in the bloodstream for several hours, adding to the level of CO already in the environment from vehicle exhaust and other pollution.A NASA image from the U.S. space agency’s Terra satellite shows carbon monoxide output from the 2015 fire and haze crisis. Concentrations of the gas nearly reached 1,300 parts per billion in Central Kalimantan province on the island of Borneo (right). The normal average is around 100 parts per billion. Image courtesy of Earth Observatory.Finally, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been shown to affect lung function and is particularly threatening to individuals who already suffer from asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although long-term, low-level exposure to NO2 may be relatively safe, short-term exposure to high concentrations of NO2 correlates with increased mortality in several studies. Firefighter exposure to NO2 has been recorded at 2.5 times the acceptable occupational limits. As noted, these chemicals can all have severe health effects in high doses, but less is known about long-term, repeated exposure. Further, the established guidelines typically do not consider the cumulative effects of multiple carcinogens, irritants and toxins bombarding the body at the same time for an extended period.Killer ParticlesBeyond the highly toxic gases listed above, however, a more threatening byproduct of peat fires appears to be fine particulate matter (PM). These airborne particles are classified as either PM10 (between 2.5 and 10 micrometers, roughly the size of dust, pollen or mold) or PM2.5 (less than 2.5 micrometers, only visible with an electron microscope). According to the WHO, both are responsible for acute respiratory issues such as asthma, while PM2.5 is increasingly linked to mortality from heart and lung disease.The ultrafine PM2.5 particles are small enough to penetrate deep into the lungs, coating the tiny air sacs known as alveoli and even crossing into the bloodstream. PM2.5 is produced by vehicle exhaust, wood burning and most other types of combustion, and while all particulates can have negative health effects, different emission sources produce different toxins. A 2013 study of Indonesian peat fire smoke found that the carcinogenic metals cadmium, chromium, nickel and cobalt where being produced at 16, 9, 8, and 13 times the rate of background pollution.The health effects of PM2.5 have been thoroughly researched in laboratory settings as well as in population-based cohort and ecological studies, and even short-term exposure is linked to cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases.A 2014 meta-analysis of 110 published studies of PM2.5 concluded that although there was some variability among the data, the general consensus was that death rates rise with even short-term exposure to ultrafine particulate matter. Taken as a whole, the literature shows that increasing short-term exposure to PM2.5 by 10 micrograms per cubic-meter (μg/m3) will result in a 1.04 percent increase in mortality risk. This is observed across all age groups in all parts of the world, with the rate varying from 0.25-2.08 percent. The highest mortality increases were reported from studies in Chile, Mexico and Brazil. (The analysis included no studies from Southeast Asia.)A man stands before a pile of oil-palm fruit at the height of the 2015 fires in the Central Kalimantan capital of Palangkaraya, an epicenter of the disaster. The orange color is real. Photo by Björn Vaughn for Greenpeace.To put the numbers in perspective, the WHO sets the standard for 24-hour average exposure to PM2.5 at 25 μg/m3. During the 2015 haze event 24-hour averages in Singapore regularly topped 100 μg/m3, with one station recording a high of 471 μg/m3.It is important to note that these acute spikes in particulate matter during haze events occur on top of daily background exposures that already well exceed safe standards. Over 90 percent of the populations of Indonesia and Malaysia and 100 percent of Singapore’s population are consistently exposed to PM2.5 levels above WHO recommendations. By contrast, less than 10 percent of the U.S. population ever experiences levels above the WHO guideline. However, even in the U.S. – where advanced healthcare is readily available and background particulate matter is relatively low – the effects from forest fires can still be deadly. A recent analysis by the U.S. EPA and Australian researchers found that short-term exposure to PM2.5 produced by wildfires in the U.S. between 2008-2012 was likely responsible for 1,880 premature deaths per year. Further, they estimate that long-term exposure to fine particulate matter likely caused 10,940-24,600 premature deaths per year for the same period.Although these numbers are lower than the 11,800-100,300 premature deaths predicted for Southeast Asia as a result of the 2015 blaze, one must consider all confounding factors including exposure times and intensity as well as access to medical care and population health before drawing any comparisons between the two.Vulnerable PopulationsOne issue with using broad population-wide studies – like the majority of those above – is that they are typically unable to tease out which groups might be at a higher risk, or to separate immediate causes from chronic conditions. For example, the effect of PM2.5 exposure on pregnancies, newborns and infants is still poorly understood, but at least one study reached a tragic conclusion.Northwestern University economist Seema Jayachandran analyzed Indonesia’s 2000 census data and found that there were over 16,000 children “missing” from the census that models otherwise expected. Further, regional decreases in the number of children correlated significantly with exposure levels during the 1997 haze crisis in different provinces.Children at a playground in Sei Ahass village, Central Kalimantan province, during the 2015 haze crisis. The air is engulfed with thick haze from the fires nearby. Photo by Björn Vaughn for Greenpeace.Other studies have found that exposure to haze during pregnancy can negatively impact a developing fetus. An analysis of 886,034 births during four years in Southern California found that fetuses who’s parents were exposed to wildfire smoke weighed 6.1 grams less than normal at birth. This weight loss may be a result of reduced oxygen in the bloodstream during pregnancy, or even the mother’s stress during haze events. Although the effect found in this study is slight, the researchers note that increased frequency of haze exposure resulted in increased negative effects. Further, they point out, if enough pregnant women are affected, no matter how slight, this could significantly alter birth outcomes for the population – particularly among those populations already at risk for low birth weight.At the other end of the lifeline, a new paper from the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre published this month reports that cases of acute lung disease increased during the 2015 haze episode, as did the number of new lung cancer patients. Although the latter is likely due to more undiagnosed cases seeking treatment for breathing difficulty, the center also reports cancer survival time decreased by 36 percent for those exposed to the haze.Clinic ASRI in Indonesia’s West Kalimantan province said via email that during the same period, their respiratory cases increased by 47 percent, and their oxygen use tripled. They did not report any haze-related deaths – which means Susilo’s nebulizer treatment must have been successful.And, while it is true that the lack of “hard data” could mean the exact toll that fires take on the people of Southeast Asia may never be known, the growing body of science well-documents the health effects of forest fire smoke on both individuals and populations.Meanwhile, for patients like Mr. Susilo, the only “hard data” that truly matters is the fact that he made it back home to his family and his garden – just in time for the rainy season. Article published by mongabayauthor Agriculture, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Haze, Health, Peatlands, Plantations, Public Health, Research, Southeast Asian Haze last_img read more

Camera traps reveal surprises in Peru

first_imgAnimals, Big Cats, Camera Trapping, Certification, Environment, Forest Stewardship Council, Forests, Jaguars, Photos, Rainforests, Research, Sustainable Forest Management, Tropical Forests, Wildlife This project allowed the team to realize the necessity of adding audio recording in addition to the camera traps.“With therecorders, we’re focusing on two things: one is the diversity of insectivorous birds, as an indicator of the state of the forest’s health, and something called ‘soundscape,’ as an indicator in terms of conservation,” Mena said.The soundscape allows the characterization of a space in terms of biodiversity; as long as the vocal register of the species is larger, it can be said that an area is in a good state of conservation. Places that have been “disturbed” tend to be those that “have lost some components of species diversity,” and a modification of the soundscape would be expected.Jaguars in Tahuamanu ProvinceAnother investigation being launched, which is more ambitious on a methodological level, is the estimation of the jaguar population in Tahuamanu Province. This is a prioritized species in terms of conservation for the WWF, whether it be in protected areas like forest concessions or in indigenous territories.When the WWF team installed the 72 monitoring stations to study the biodiversity within the forest concessions, it chose to install 58 double stations, in collaboration with the San Diego Zoo. The stations were set up along “the forest roads, because jaguars really like to travel on the roads and those are the places where you can have a better chance of photographing and registering them.”The stations are doubled in order to photograph both the left and right sides of the animal, since the only way to identify individual jaguars is by their spots. The spots are distinct on each jaguar, just like fingerprints.“That identification of the individuals is the basis for estimating the population of jaguars in the area. We’re talking about 1,000 square kilometers just to study the jaguar,” said Mena, who confirmed that there were a total of 116 camera traps installed.Being the Amazon’s ultimate predator, the jaguar is an important indicator of biodiversity on the level of “large landscapes and biological corridors,” Mena said, adding that “if you ensure the conservation of the jaguar in the area, you ensure the conservation of the other species that live there.”In total, the camera traps installed to monitor the jaguar population in Tahuamanu Province have recorded more than 85,000 hours of video. The videos, which are being analyzed, will allow researchers to determine the number of jaguars in forest concessions in the province in the next few months. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis This story was reported by Mongabay Latam and was first published in Spanish on November 14, 2017. Camera trap videos courtesy of WWF PeruFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Scientists set 72 camera traps and audio recorders to compare biodiversity across certified forested areas and forests that are not certified for sustainable use.The first few images reveal the presence of jaguars, pumas, jaguarundis, tapirs, red deer, tufted capuchins and even bush dogs, which are elusive and difficult to find. TAHUAMANU PROVINCE, Peru – In June of this year, a group of scientists entered the tropical forest in Tahuamanu Province, situated in the extreme northern portion of the Madre de Dios Region, to install 72 monitoring stations. Each station included a camera trap and an audio recorder. These tools were intended to record the wildlife in the jungles of Madre de Dios for a two-month period.Like vigilant eyes that activate at the slightest movement, day and night, the 72 camera traps and audio recorders captured data that now form part of the research study. The researchers hope to study the biodiversity of three forest concessions in Tahuamanu Province, an area that makes up 15 percent of the Peruvian Amazon.José Luis Mena, scientific director of WWF Peru, explained to Mongabay Latam that “the majority of forest concessions in Tahuamanu have forestry certification, and the objective that we have with this project is to compare the state of biodiversity conservation in two types of concessions: certified and not certified.”For that reason, the monitoring stations were installed in 24 certified concessions, 24 non-certified concessions and 24 “control areas,” which refers to the spaces inside the concessions that have not yet been put to use. This equipment was placed at strategic points in these three areas with the goal of registering large mammals, medium-sized mammals and flightless birds. Even though the specific results will not be known until next year, Mena says that the teams were impressed by the number of spider monkeys in the area when they set up the stations.“What surprised me was the frequency with which we saw groups of spider monkeys in an area close to where trucks pass by,” Mena said. “These primates are an indicator of a good state of conservation, at least that there isn’t hunting, because in places with hunting, you don’t find spider monkeys. And in many parts of Madre de Dios, it isn’t easy to see these primates; you have to walk for hours and hours.”Forest concessions in Tahuamanu ProvinceNelson Kroll moved to Madre de Dios 15 years ago, attracted by the idea of living in the Amazon. Three years later, he started working in the Maderacre forest concession, located in the Iñapari District in Tahuamanu Province. The Maderacre forest concession is one of the country’s largest forest management units. The concession, which spans more than 220,000 hectares, is one of the spaces in which the team of investigators installed monitoring stations.Maderacre has been a part of the group of certified forest concessions since 2007. Kroll says that they decided to take this step in order to give credit to a responsible management team that is dedicated to the forest’s sustainability.A frog surveys its domain within the forest concession owned by Maderacre. Photo by Nelson KrollHowever, attaining certification requires commitment, according to Mena. “The certification is an acknowledgement, an initiative that seeks to raise the standards of forest activity, so it has a series of recommendations that the licensees include, and in the particular case of fauna, it includes, for example, the prohibition of hunting,” Mena said. “A concession with the FSC [Forest Stewardship Council] doesn’t practice hunting; they get their food from the city, and you can be certain that you can go to a place where you can see wildlife.”Kroll, who confirmed that his company’s certification is based on the principles and criteria of the FSC, added that their use of forest resources “is selective and of reduced impact, which means that all the labor is carried out with the goal of the protection of the workers and the reduction of the impacts on vegetation, wildlife, and the physical environment in general.”The Maderacre certified forest concession. Photo by Nelson Kroll The importance of evaluating spaces like this, Mena said, lies in the need to confirm the effectiveness of certain conservation initiatives.“Many times it’s assumed that conservation initiatives themselves are good, but we need hard data to show that they really are,” he said. He explained that their hypothesis is that forest concessions that are certified should hold a “greater number of species or have a community that would indicate to us a higher level of conservation than the others, those that do not have FSC [certification].”A puma (Puma concolor) spotted in Tahuamanu Province. Photo courtesy of WWF PeruBush dogs (Spheotus venaticus). Photo courtesy of WWF PeruA tufted capuchin (Sapajus apella). Photo courtesy of WWF Peru Wildlife recordedThe camera traps and audio recorders sat in the forest until September of this year, when the group of scientists returned to the concessions in Tahuamanu to retrieve them. This was one of the most exciting moments of the investigation, Mena said, because they didn’t know what they would find until they checked the footage. Now, after viewing the data, they can confirm the presence of species such as jaguars (Panthera onca), ocelots (Leopardus pardalis), pumas (Puma concolor), jaguarundis (Puma yaguarundi), South American tapirs (Tapirus terrestris), red deer (Mazama americana), tufted capuchins (Sapajus apella) and bush dogs (Spheotus venaticus).The researchers started their investigation two years ago in 2015 with the launch of a study of small mammals in two forest concessions, which registered 27 species. The information collected will also be included in a publication that will be released in the next few months. One of the reasons for its development was to implement different data collection techniques, which the scientists say will help refine the methodology used in Tahuamanu. A brown four-eyed opossum, one of the marsupials registered during the 2015 field investigation. Photo courtesy of WWF Peru Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Rice farmer dies after tractor topples

first_imgRice farmer Robert Kendall of Number 46 Village, Corentyne, East Berbice died when the tractor he was operating in a field at Number 46 Village toppled and pinned him underneath.According to his 23-year-old son Gavin Kendall, he and his father were operating the tractor about a quarter of a mile away from the Corentyne Highway when the vehicle turned turtle at about 14:00h and pinned his father.The grieving son explained that with the aid of other farmers in the area, he was able to get his father from under the tractor, and he rushed him to the Port Mourant Hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. A post mortem is shortly expected to be performed on Kendall’s body.64-year-old Hatim Khan, also called ‘Jackson,’ of Lot 13 Adelphi Village, East Canje, died on May 31 when a tractor turned turned and pinned him at New Forest, East Canje.last_img read more

Rayon Sport duo miss out on Gor CAF list

first_img0Shares0000NAIROBI, Kenya, January 20 – The Rayon sport duo of defenders Burundian Abdul Karim Nzigiyamana and Rwandese Abouba Sibomana have not been included into Gor Mahia CAF Champions League quad after the completion of their signing fell out of the January 15 CAF deadline. Gor have submitted a list of 23 players and club’s deputy Secretary General Ronald Ngala told Capital Sport they had to submit a slim squad due to the constraints of the deadline.“We finished talking to them after the January 15 CAF deadline and therefore it was impossible for us to have them in the squad. They had been training with us however and we have included them into our league squad,” Ngala told.The fate of defender Israel Emuge however still hangs in the balance as he hasn’t been included in either of the squads but Ngala says they are hunting for one foreign striker and if they manage to get him, then they will let go of the Ugandan as they have only one slot remaining for a foreigner.“If we get the striker, then we will release Emuge. However, if we don’t, we will get one local and that means Emuge stays. We want to have a squad of maximum 28 players,” he added.Among the players who have not been included in the continental squad but are in the local list include Innocent Wafula signed from Chemelil Sugar and Ernest Wendo from National Super League side Bidco.At the same, Gor have received an invitation from Ugandan league sides Vipers and Sports Club Villa for friendly matches.“We need to prepare well for the continental games and if we had better strength financially, then we would have prepared better. We will be going to Uganda in the last week of our preseason.“We have also planned to go to Mombasa where we will play three friendly matches. At the moment, the team is in Nakuru and we face Western Stima tomorrow,” the deputy Secretary General confirmed.head coach Frank Nuttal is bracing himself for a tough season but says he is optimistic his new players will fit in the bill, pointing out losing three key players was a huge blow to his side.“We can’t pretend that losing Owino (David), Sserunkuma (Danny), and Kizito (Geoffrey) is ordinary, definitely it was a huge blow but I am hopeful the new players will fill in well. Of course the new players are coming up well and I am hopeful they will seal those gaps very well,” the Scotsman declared.Gor Mahia’s continental squadGoalkeepers: Jerim Onyango, Boniface Oluoch, David JumaDefenders: Musa Mohammed, Bernard Odhiambo, Dirkir Glay, Kevin Oluoch, Harun ShakavaMidfielders: Collins Okoth, Erick Ochieng, Geffrey Walusimbi, Khalid Aucho, Jerry Santo, Ronald Omino, Victor Ali AbondoStrikers: Timothy Otieno, George ‘Blackberry’ Odhiambo, Herbart Kopany, Michael Olunga, Toufiq ZacharyPlayers to add on for KPL listAbdoul Karim Nzigiyamana, Abouba Sibomana, Innocent Wafula, Ernest Wendo.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Start of Klopp era is finally here

first_img0Shares0000Jurgen Klopp is unveiled as new Liverpool manager last week. PHOTO/Liverpool FCLONDON, October 17- The Jurgen Klopp era at Liverpool will begin in earnest on Saturday when the crowd-pleasing German takes charge of his first Premier League match against Tottenham Hotspur.Klopp has been appointed as the successor to Brendan Rodgers on a three-year contract with the brief of reviving a team who have won only one of their last nine games inside 90 minutes in all competitions. He might have preferred an easier venue for his first game than White Hart Lane, where Spurs crushed Manchester City 4-1 in their last home match, but he wants his players to embrace the challenge.“Some things you can change instantly: mentality, readiness,” said Klopp, whose side are 10th in the table, a point below eight-place Tottenham.“That is all you can change. To get really tuned as a team takes time, but I am really not interested in the problems we could have on Saturday.“I want to see more bravery, more fun in their eyes. I want to see that they like what they do. I saw that in the week (in training) and that is good.”If his seven-year spell at Borussia Dortmund is a reliable indicator, the rewards for impressing Klopp in the early days of his tenure could be significant.Of the 18 players called up for his first game, a 3-2 win away to Bayer Leverkusen in August 2008, seven featured in the squad that faced Bayern Munich in the Champions League final five years later.Saturday’s match, Liverpool’s first since the 1-1 draw at derby rivals Everton that proved to be Rodgers’s last, will be closely scrutinised for clues as to how Klopp intends to reverse the club’s fortunes.Work-rate and aggressive pressing were the cornerstones of his approach at Dortmund, who he led to two Bundesliga titles, and he is likely to find willing adherents in grafters like James Milner.But forward Danny Ings, another hard-running player, is expected to miss the rest of the season after reportedly succumbing to a knee ligament injury in training on Wednesday.– Pochettino homework – Teenage defender Joe Gomez sustained a similar injury the day before and Klopp will also be without captain Jordan Henderson and close-season signings Christian Benteke and Roberto Firmino for his English baptism.The trip to north London will offer a useful point of comparison for Klopp because Spurs, like Liverpool, seek above all to close the gap on the heavyweight quartet of Chelsea, Arsenal and the two Manchester clubs.In that respect, Tottenham head coach Mauricio Pochettino has had a 17-month head start on Klopp, having been appointed in May 2014.Another advocate of aggressive, high-pressing football, Pochettino steered Spurs to a fifth-place finish last season — one place above Liverpool — and recent signs suggest that his philosophy is bearing fruit.Since losing at Manchester United on the opening day, Spurs have gone seven league games unbeaten and the rout of City showcased the improvements that Pochettino has wrought from his young, hard-working squad.He, too, must contend with missing players as new signing Son Heung-Min and midfielders Ryan Mason and Nabil Bentaleb are injured, while Eric Dier is suspended.Spurs have lost their last five league games against Liverpool, shipping 18 goals in the process, but Pochettino has been doing his homework on how Klopp is likely to approach the game.“We can use the information because in the last few months Liverpool have played in different ways and changed the system,” Pochettino said.“How we analyse Dortmund and the way Klopp played, it’s similar concepts that we can take.“We have some references — maybe we give too much information — but the first half against Arsenal, they played in a similar style he played with Dortmund last season.“We have a lot of resources to research the information. But in the end the truth is Saturday and how they put in place his ideas.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Jane Sheldon named Fort St. John’s best chili chef

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John Potters Guild held their 11th Annual Chili Bowl Bash fundraiser on the weekend.The event sold out all 125 tickets and saw eight chefs competing for 1st place.Jane Sheldon was the big winner of the day as her chili narrowly bested Jessica Harisson’s dish.- Advertisement -Results for the Chilli Cook-off are shown below:1st place: Jane Sheldon2nd place: Jessica Harisson3rd place: Rebecca DonnellThe event saw all proceeds go to the Fort St. John Potters Guild and managed to rake in over $4,500.last_img