Huskies baseball team has plenty to look forward to

first_imgBY WARREN RAPPLEYEA Staff Writer BY WARREN RAPPLEYEAStaff Writer The Matawan High School baseball team went on a tear late in the season, winning eight of its final 11 contests, thanks in large part to the contributions of several young players. Coach John Kaye’s Huskies finished at 12-11, or 11-11 depending on who you talk to. A controversial decision by the NJSIAA to not count a forfeit win over Asbury Park cost the Huskies a berth in the Central Jersey Group II tourney. Asbury Park arrived late for the contest, which was scheduled on the final day teams could qualify for the state tourney. Kaye noted that the umpiring crew declared a forfeit before Asbury Park arrived, but the struggling Blue Bishops disputed the decision. Later in the day, Matawan defeated Keansburg, which gave the Huskies a .500 record and a tournament berth. “We certainly would have liked to have played the Asbury Park game, but once the umpires made the decision, it was out of our hands,” Kaye said. “Since the game was on the last day to qualify, we needed that win.” Nevertheless, Kaye’s team has plenty to look forward to. Three sophomores broke into the starting lineup and performed well, and a pair of juniors – center fielder Nick Chomko and shortstop Julian Sonnenfeld – each hit .345. Sonnenfeld also blasted three homers and led the team with 22 RBIs. Of course the Huskies will miss stellar seniors such as John Foster, Tyler Renner and Danny Conti. Foster led Matawan with a .398 average and 25 runs scored. The second baseman had a .450 on-base percentage to go with 31 hits and 18 RBIs, while providing solid glove work in the field. Renner went 3-5 on the mound with a 3.80 ERA, but Kaye noted that Renner often drew the top opposing teams. In 55 innings of work, Renner struck out 65 batters, and he tossed a one-hitter in a 10-1 triumph over Delsea. Conti, a lefty, went 4-2 with two saves and became more aggressive as the campaign rolled along, challenging hitters with good results, the coach noted. A first baseman when not on the hill, Conti hit .340. Meanwhile, sophomore Dan Geran pitched well when called upon, turning in a 3-1 mark. Junior Matt Buragina showed promise, and infielders Kevin Knox and J.D. Melendez are likely to see some pitching duty next spring. Sophomore catcher Fran Santimauro did an outstanding job defensively behind the dish. Alternating between the No. 2 and 9 spots in the batting order, Santimauro hit .385 with 12 RBIs and displayed good speed on the base paths. Melendez, who started the season 0-15 at the plate, hit .365 overall with 19 RBIs as he went on a tear down the stretch. Knox, who manned the hot corner, hit .255 and contributed several clutch hits, Kaye notes. “We started out all right, but then we struggled,” the coach explained. “We were 4-8 when the guys turned things around, and our younger guys deserve a lot of credit for that. It’s not as easy as it looks.” During the season, Matawan scored victories over Raritan, Rumson-Fair Haven and Manasquan. In the Shore Challenge, the Huskies downed both Linden and Delsea. While there’s plenty of optimism for next year, the Huskies will be moving up to the Shore Conference’s Class B North division. Currently Matawan resides in the Class A Central division. “That will be a challenge, but we’ll be ready for it,” Kaye said. Lions should contend once again next year BY WARREN RAPPLEYEA Staff Writer After going through something of a rebuilding year, the Middletown High School North softball team will be looking to get back to its winning ways next spring. With just two seniors in the lineup, new coach Bill LaFalce’s team managed to post a respectable eight victories against 11 defeats. Along the way, the Lions upended Colts Neck in the opening round of the Monmouth County Tournament and also scored a win against crosstown rival Middletown South. The Lions went 6-6 in the Shore Conference’s competitive Class A North division, and seven of the 11 losses were by two runs or less. “At times our inexperience showed,” LaFalce said. “We seemed to have one bad inning every game and usually that turned out to be the difference in the game. On the other hand, the girls got a lot of experience and they were learning from their mistakes.” Shortstop Cara Piasecki and right fielder Liz Kelly were the Lions’ two senior starters. Both were solid defensively, and Piasecki’s .321 average was second on the team. Piasecki also drove in eight runs and whacked a pair of triples. Junior Lindsey Nadolny topped Middletown North in batting with a .352 mark. The third baseman also contributed three doubles, a homer and seven RBIs. DH Danielle Susi hit .308 with four RBIs, and first baseman Jenna Lougee ended the campaign at .286. Both are juniors. LaFalce noted that sophomore Casey Crist performed well at second base and contributed a .268 average. Freshman right fielder Amanda Svenson displayed strong potential with a .275 average, and Laura Dorsa, another freshman, did a good job and kept improving behind the plate. Middletown North should be set again next year on the mound with Krystal Kinsella. The junior hurler was 6-10 but had a 2.33 ERA while striking out 100 batters in 108 innings of work. “The girls were in every game they played,” the coach said. “They made mistakes, but the effort was good and they continued to improve. I was very pleased with our efforts against some of the top teams like Ocean and RBC. The girls played very well; we just couldn’t get past them. Those kinds of games will help us next season.” The Lions were actually quite stingy defensively, allowing an average of just under 2.5 runs per game. To pick up more victories, Middletown North will have to score a few more runs. “If we can improve our hitting throughout the lineup, we’ll be a strong contender next year,” LaFalce said. “We have a good experienced pitcher, and the girls generally play good defense. And most of the girls are coming back. Of course, we’ll have to get a new shortstop, but we do have a lot of talent.”last_img read more

Rashford double gives United victory over Liverpool

first_imgMarcus Rashford struck twice as Manchester United won the North West derby with a 2-1 victory over Liverpool at Old Trafford on Saturday to open up a five point gap on their third-placed rivals.A long ball from goalkeeper David De Gea was headed on by target-man Romelu Lukaku into the path of Rashford. He then outdid Trent Alexander-Arnold, cut inside on to his right foot and confidently buried the ball in the far corner to open the scoring in the 14th minute.Ten minutes later, Lukaku was again instrumental. He won another challenge with Dejan Lovren before his pass towards Juan Mata was deflected into the path of Rashford who, again, showed great confidence and technique as he beat Loris Karius to make it 2-0.Liverpool, who had been well below-par, got themselves back into the game in the 66th minute when United defender Eric Bailly, who had returned to the side after over three months out with injury, made a complete hash of a Sadio Mane cross from the left, his mis-struck clearance flying past De Gea and into his own goal.last_img read more

Is sustainability sustainable in the Age of Trump?

first_imgWe believe there is still plenty of opportunity to protect our environment and society, in part because Trump’s actions have virtually no popular support and limited business support.Even Trump voters support environmental regulation and renewable energy.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the authors. For Americans who care about sustainability, it’s been three long, tough months. It started in January with two executive orders lifting financial and environmental restrictions on oil and coal companies. Then came the appointment of EPA antagonist Scott Pruitt as head of the agency, followed by President Trump’s proposed 31 percent cut to the EPA budget. Finally, there was the president’s March 28 executive order to withdraw from the Clean Power Plan and cancel Barack Obama’s 2016 auto emissions standards.What’s next? Trump has said many times he wants to withdraw from the 2015 Paris COP21 climate accord. But whether the U.S. stays in the accord or not, it’s clear the new administration has no intention of meeting our commitments to it.They killed us, but they ain’t whupped us yetWhat now? Let’s start by taking a deep breath and remember what Tim Kaine said in his election night concession speech:“They killed us, but they ain’t whupped us yet.”We believe there is still plenty of opportunity to protect our environment and society, in part because Trump’s actions have virtually no popular support and limited business support.Pew Research says 89 percent of Americans support expanding the use of solar power, and 59 percent support stricter environmental laws and regulations.Even Trump voters support environmental regulation and renewable energy. Republican polling firm Public Opinion Strategies found that 75 percent of Trump voters support action to accelerate the deployment and use of clean energy.Bucking the business communityThe Trump team is also on the “wrong” side of Big Business. GreenBiz’s 2017 Green Economy survey looked specifically at how corporate sustainability strategies will be affected by power shifts in the presidency and Congress. The survey finds that these changes will have no impact on 60 percent of the respondents’ sustainability strategies, and just over a third say it will “slow us down but not stop us.”Pledging allegianceWhy do companies plan to stay the course? For one thing, many organizations have already publicly pledged allegiance to sustainable business practices while tying their brands to a socially responsible mission.A Corporate Citizenship survey reports that 40 percent of companies are working to achieve at least one of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)—up from 19 percent last year.Of course, companies know that sustainability isn’t just good for their brand — it’s good for their business. A study by Harvard Business School demonstrates that sustainability-focused companies outperform their peers. An Arabesque/Oxford study shows Good Environment, Social and Governance (ESG) standards lower the cost of capital and help deliver better operational performance.Better engagement and retention metrics Sustainability is proving to be a big factor in employee engagement and retention. A study by SHRM, BSR & Aurosoorya found that morale was 55 percent higher in companies with strong sustainability programs. Cone Research found that 64 percent of millennial job candidates won’t work for a company that doesn’t have strong corporate social responsibility commitments.The investor climate is changingAs business proves the sustainable business case, sustainable finance is on the rise.According to the Sustainability Stock Exchanges (SSE) initiative, 58 stock exchanges — representing over 70 percent of listed equity markets — have made a public commitment to advancing sustainability in their market.In the U.S., total assets invested that consider environmental issues have grown 77-fold since 2010 and now exceed $7.79 trillion, according to the Green Business 2017 report.Joining forces, speaking outAll of this is emboldening business leaders to speak out publicly about sustainability and, increasingly, to join forces with other leaders to amplify the message.In 2013, then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg formed Risky Business with former Secretary of the Treasury Hank Paulsen and philanthropist Tom Steyer. Their mission is to speak out on the economic risks of climate change and make the case for why the U.S. should invest in a clean energy economy.An open letter to world leaders was issued in the lead up to COP21 in Paris. Here, a coalition of CEOs from 79 companies and 20 economic sectors — representing $2.1 trillion of combined revenue —affirmed their commitment to ambitious business action on climate change, and urged the world’s leaders to reach an ambitious climate deal at COP21.By COP21, the coalition had 543 companies and investors commit to at least one of its initiatives, which included adopting a science-based target, putting a price on carbon, and procuring 100 percent of electricity from renewable sources. By the beginning of 2017, 688 companies and investors have committed to at least one of these initiatives.Is sustainability sustainable?Is sustainability in the U.S. really sustainable now that Donald Trump sits in the Oval Office? The GreenBiz report is cautiously optimistic:“In an increasingly complex business environment of growing resource use and climate concern, along with the uncertainties brought about by the 2016 U.S. elections, sustainable business faces a challenging future. However, we’re seeing that the world’s largest companies remain steadfast in their sustainability commitments and achievements.”The fact is, sustainable business is an enormous opportunity. A recent study by the Business & Sustainable Development Commission says that achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in just four economic systems could open 60 market ‘hot spots’ worth an estimated $12 trillion by 2030.”The sustainable business opportunity is probably bigger than that. We would argue that it is stronger than any one person’s political agenda, even the president of the United States.A longer version of this article is available on Corporate Eco Forum’s EcoInnovator Blog. Climate Politics, Energy, Environment, Environmental Policy, Green Energy, Renewable Energy, Sustainability Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

A return to mixed roots in a Sumatran forest

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The indigenous Rejang are rediscovering multicropping after years spent focusing on coffee monoculture.The Rejang generally abandoned polyculture after the national government established a national park on their lands.Multicropping helps them make money year-round instead of just when it’s time for the coffee harvest. TIK SIRONG, Indonesia — It is often said in this archipelago country that the best solutions come through consensus. The phrase typically refers to people. But sometimes a compromise is made across time.Take for instance the Rejang people, who live in 65 villages abutting Sumatra’s stunning Kerinci Seblat National Park.Measuring in at twice the size of Bali, Kerinci Seblat is a dramatic park dotted with caves, peaks and the largest crater lake in Southeast Asia. One of the last homes of the endangered Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), the park also boasts 370 bird species. But the park was established in 1999 without consulting the peoples already extant here. With clan lands falling in the area the national government cordoned off for conservation, the Rejang “were labeled ‘illegals’ and ‘encroachers’,” said Erwin Basrin, director of the Akar Foundation, a local community development group. Along with modernization and market forces, “This changed their view of how forests and their gardens should be managed.”The treatement of the Rejang is but one example of an ugly history in the field of conservation of marginalizing indigenous peoples. But today in Sumatra, years after Kerinci Seblat absorbed their clan lands, the Rejang are rediscovering their heritage by relearning the polycultural agriculture practiced by their ancestors.Retro-gardeningIn the tiny village of Tik Sirong, former headman Busroni was the first to convert his coffee grove into a polyculture garden — in which multiple crops are grown in the same space — interspersing the coffee bushes with kabau and jengkol bean trees. The species are easy to maintain. Harvest season for the beans is December through January, a particularly tough time of year for monocrop coffee farmers. With the monoculture gardens, the harvest comes once a year, between May and August. And the money from that is supposed to last all year. A failed crop might mean a family must turn to pawning goods or doing contract labor.But kabau and jengkol beans don’t spoil, which means they can be sold throughout the year. Jengkol, used in curries and chili sauce, is prized by Indonesians, sometimes fetching a better price in the market than beef or chicken.Busroni stands amid his coffee bushes and jengkol trees. Photo by Dedek Hendry for Mongabay.Busroni planted the bean trees in 2005. “Initially, the villagers rejected [Busroni’s] garden system,” said Sahrul Arufi, the new village chief. “But then he made his first harvest in 2010 and news of his success spread.” Today, half of Tik Sirong’s 600 families also plant the trees in their coffee groves, 10 to 15 plants each. Some also plant petai beans, durian and bamboo. “In the past, bamboo was ubiquitous to the Rejang garden,” Busroni said. “We planted bamboo at the garden edge or at steep sections. Bamboo shores up soil that might otherwise erode,” making floods more likely. In 1995, flash floods killed nine people and destroyed houses in Tik Sirong. The sturdy plant doubles as a versatile building material for houses, garden fences and household utensils. What’s left is sold in the market.“Only if we have other, valuable harvest plants in the garden can we get returns, otherwise we have to open new gardens,” Busroni said. Near Kerinci Seblat, the agricultural soil must be improved every seven years. Before the reintroduction of polyculture gardens, farmers abandoned lots once the soil fertility went down, choosing instead to clear forest for new gardens.The common hill myna can be found in Kerinci Seblat National Park. Photo by Asep Ayat.Aligned with scienceYansen, head of the Agriculture Department at the University of Bengkulu, is a fan of Tik Sirong’s polyculture efforts. “It is wonderful this technique and local wisdom are being used again,” he said. “Polyculture truly rebuilds forests. It is in line with science.”Ecological studies have shown that polyculture groves stabilize microclimates and aid soil structure and fertility. Mixed planting also reduces runoff because it reduces soil exposure. This in turn regulates groundwater levels.Yansen thinks polyculture groves are a positive step because coffee actually does better in a mixed planting scenario as opposed to monoculture plots. Coffee needs protective plants to reach its maximum productivity. Jengkol, kabau, petai, durian, lamtoro, dadap, and other plants can play that protective role.The bean trees jengkol, kabau and petai are all members of the Leguminosae family. That means they can store nitrogen from the air in their roots, fertilizing the soil. “All plants need nitrogen though not all are able to absorb it,” Yansen said.A pair of wreathed hornbills, which are native to Kerinci Seblat. Photo by Asep Ayat.Conflict resolutionIn Basrin’s view, the government can aid the Rejang in two main ways: first, by recognizing their rights to the lands they have customarily managed — in line with a broader push for indigenous rights in Indonesia — and second, by allowing clan lands to be co-managed by the national park and the Rejang themselves.To help bring this about, the Akar Foundation has facilitated the mapping of customary lands in nine of the 65 Rejang villages and submitted the maps to a district legislature to be incorporated into government maps of the area.Basrin hopes that within the next year the local government will formally recognize the customary lands. Four other villages are currently in negotiation with the national park.Banner image: A Sumatran tiger. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Oct. 5, 2016. Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Agriculture, Agroforestry, Community Forestry, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Forestry, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Conflict, Land Reform, Land Rights, Land Use Change, National Parks, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Brazil evicts 80 rural peasant families, awards land thieves parcel

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon People, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Roads, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Glenn Scherer 80 families, hopeful of being granted land in the Amazon state of Pará, have instead been ordered by a Brazilian court to vacate their camp located on the parcel in just two weeks.The land will then be turned over to members of the Vilela family, notorious convicted land thieves, illegal forest fellers and members of the wealthy Brazilian rural elite.The judge’s decision has been called into question. Eliane Moreira, Justice Prosecutor in the Pará Public Ministry, has long criticized authorities for allowing land thieves to use the environmental register to legitimize land grabs, something the judge has now endorsed.It will be very difficult for the peasant families to appeal the decision, as they don’t have the resources to hire a lawyer and cover other legal expenses. One of the shacks at which 80 peasant families have been living for nearly a year in hopes of obtaining ownership of a small plot to call their own in the Brazilian Amazon. Their hopes were thwarted this week when a Brazilian judge handed over the plot to known land thieves. Photo by Thais Borges(Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read this Mongabay article in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil)Until this week 80 impoverished families, camped for almost a year under black plastic tents, were hopeful that, despite violent attempts by gunmen to evict them, that they would soon win rights to a piece of land and be able to build a better life for themselves.The camp, near the BR-163 highway in southwest Pará state, is located in an Amazonian region where violent land conflicts have escalated to very high levels recently, as illegal loggers and land thieves try to intimidate and drive out indigenous communities, traditional populations and peasant families.When Mongabay visited the camp in November 2016, Rodolfo Ávila, a lawyer assisting the peasant movement, said that “INCRA [the National Institute for Colonization and Agrarian Reform] has destined this land for agrarian reform, which is exactly what these families are calling for.”But on Monday, 19 June, a judge in the city of Santarém in Pará decided in favor of the Junqueira Vilela family — known nationally and internationally to be running a powerful criminal gang that steals land, illegally fells forest and uses slave labor.The judge gave the encamped families two weeks to vacate.The landless peasant occupation camp near the BR-163 highway in southwest Pará state near the town of Novo Progresso from which the 80 families have been ordered to be evicted by the court. Photo by Thais BorgesThe court ruling came in response to a judicial action launched in April by Vilela family siblings, Beatriz and Marco Junqueira Vilela, Dorival Pandin and Heládio Cezer Menezes Machado. Three of the four are directly linked to other members of the Vilela Junqueira family, which was targeted by the Flying Rivers Operation, a federal investigation jointly launched in June 2016 by the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), the environmental agency IBAMA, and the Federal Police.Marco and Beatriz are the cousins of Antonio José Junqueira Vilela Filho, known as Jotinha, and of Ana Luíza Junqueira Vilela Viacava, both arrested for land theft, the formation of a criminal gang, illegal deforestation and other crimes carried out near the peasant camp.Heládio Cezar Menezes Machado was accused of “coercive behavior” during the Flying Rivers Operation and partnered with Junqueira Vilela in the building of the Rochedo and Nhandu hydroelectric dams, both closed down after accusations of various illegal acts.An area of Amazon forest cleared by the AJ Vilela gang near the Baú indigenous reserve. Photo courtesy of Brazil’s Environmental Protection Directorate (Diretoria de Proteção Ambiental – IBAMA)The judicial decision, which was reached without consulting the peasant families, was largely based on documents presented by those bringing the action, documents that include an Environmental Rural Register (CAR) and the Authorization for the Functioning of Rural Activity (AFAR), which the judge accepted as proving ownership.But Eliane Moreira, Justice Prosecutor in the State of the Pará Public Ministry, argues that “the CAR was never intended as a land ownership tool but as a tool for environmental monitoring.” In other words, the CAR is issued to those claiming ownership and doesn’t in itself prove ownership, while AFARs have not been valid since 2013.The judge accepted the assurances made by those bringing the action, saying that he was confident that the land being turned over to them would be maintained “in accordance with [Brazil’s] environmental legislation.” However, according to IBAMA, more than 1,000 hectares (2,470+ acres) in the vicinity have been illegally deforested by Wander José Junqueira Vilela, the father of Marco and Beatriz.A map showing illegal deforestation by the Vilela family carried out across adjoining land plots. Map by Mauricio TorresThe area in dispute has been divided into lots, none of which exceeds the maximum size permitted by the law. Each lot has a different CAR and, allegedly, a different owner. However, it is interesting to note (see map) that the deforestation carried out by Wander José crosses several properties, clearly suggesting that the partners have used the old Amazonian trick by which a land thief gets other people, known as “laranjas” (oranges), to register the land in their name to circumvent legal restrictions on size.Another possible indication that those gaining property rights in the case are perhaps not as well intentioned environmentally, and as respectful of the law, as the judge believed is Marco Junqueira Vilela’s profile on Facebook. While his cousins were under arrest during the Flying Rivers Operation, he had as his Facebook “wallpaper” a satellite image of the forest illegally cleared by his family. The wallpaper was later removed.A screenshot of Facebook wallpaper showing a satellite image of Amazon land illegally deforested by the Junqueira Vilela family.Marco possibly believed he was thumbing his nose at law enforcement and other authorities in an amusing fashion, but some Brazilians, who saw the image via social media, viewed the deforestation wallpaper as an arrogant expression by a member of the Brazilian rural elite who believes he can steal public property, do profound damage to it, then get society to condone and reward his action — an arrogance that this week’s judicial ruling seems to demonstrate could be well founded.Mongabay contacted Marco Junqueira Vilela by email with various detailed questions but he did not reply.The judge’s ruling was only preliminary and the peasants have the right to be heard before the final decision is taken. However, the families have very little money and will find it difficult even to cobble together enough cash for the two-day bus fare to Santarém, let alone pay for a lawyer who can stand up to the legal onslaught that the skilled professionals employed by the Vilela family can unleash.Moreover, by the time a final hearing would be held, the families will likely have been evicted. There is little doubt that the optimism that reigned in the camp when Mongabay visited last November will have been replaced this week by despair.(Leia essa matéria em português no The Intercept Brasil. You can also read this Mongabay article in Portuguese at The Intercept Brasil)FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. COMMENT: After the publication of this article, representatives of the Junqueira Vilela family contacted Mongabay and The Intercept Brasil with the following notes in Portuguese, which we publish here in full. This update was made on 5 July, 2017:Note 1:Em resposta à reportagem “Justiça decide que agricultores devem deixar terras reclamadas por desmatadores”, publicada por esse site, os produtores rurais Wander José Junqueira Vilela e seus filhos Marco Junqueira Vilela e Beatriz Junqueira Vilela esclarecem que detêm a posse da área mencionada desde 1999.Diferentemente do que alega o texto, não há e nunca houve “80 famílias” acampadas nas terras particulares dos Junqueira Vilela. A decisão judicial que expulsa os invasores menciona apenas quatro famílias. A própria foto feita pelos autores do texto mostra uma única barraca com menos de dez pessoas. Tampouco é real que a área referida tenha sido destinada à reforma agrária pelo governo. Os documentos estão à disposição dos interessados. As quatro famílias são compostas de grileiros profissionais que atuam na região, invadindo terras particulares e da União para loteá-las e vendê-las clandestinamente.Na sexta-feira passada (23/06) e no último domingo (25/06), o Ibama fez operações na região para combater os focos de desmatamentos produzidos por esses invasores, que tiveram sua barraca queimada.JOSÉ AMARONote 2:Caros, tudo bem?O site Mongabay publicou recentemente uma reportagem mencionando o produtor rural Antônio José Junqueira Vilela e seus familiares.https://pt.mongabay.com/2017/06/justica-decide-agricultores-devem-deixar-terras-reclamadas-desmatadores/Os repórteres autores que assinam o texto não nos procuraram para ouvir nosso lado, descumprindo uma das regras basilares do jornalismo de qualidade. Consequentemente, algumas informações contidas no texto estão erradas e há ainda muitas denúncias que já foram desqualificadas na justiça. Peço, por favor, para publicarem nossa nota no pé da reportagem.Abaixo, segue a nossa nota. E claro, caso queiram, temos documentos judiciais comprovando todos os argumentos.Muito obrigado. Abraços.Diego Braga NorteNota de esclarecimentoO texto produzido pela Mongabay, agência financiada pelas fundações americanas Ford e Overbrook, e publicado a 20/06/17, com o título “Justiça decide que agricultores devem deixar terras reclamadas por desmatadores”, tem erros factuais que precisam ser corrigidos.As acusações contra a família Junqueira Vilela são falsas. Os autores do texto não ouviram o outro lado. Se existe alguma “poderosa quadrilha que grila terras, desmata e explora trabalho escravo na Amazônia”, os acusadores terão a chance de provar o que afirmam na Justiça.O texto, maliciosamente, associa a decisão judicial noticiada a Antonio Junqueira Vilela Filho, quando as terras pertencem a seus primos com quem não mantém qualquer tipo de sociedade ou proximidade geográfica.A tentativa de oferecer um discurso ideológico em formato de notícia cai por terra diante dos fatos. Acusações feitas contra os Junqueira Vilela no final de 2016 foram agora reproduzidas — mas omitiu-se do leitor que cada uma delas está sendo desmentida judicialmente. Para incriminar a família, usaram-se gravações de telefonemas no Mato Grosso, de propriedades onde não há restrições para a produção rural, como se os diálogos tivessem ocorrido no Pará — em região que sequer é alcançada por operadoras de telefonia.O Ibama induziu o Ministério Público e a Justiça a erro — o que agora está sendo corrigido — uma realidade que, aparentemente, não interessa à agência americana divulgar.Por essa razão, torna-se necessária a publicação deste esclarecimento.last_img read more

Indonesia’s decision to share vessel tracking data ‘ill-advised,’ some say

first_imgBanner image: A fishermen’s haul in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. In June, Indonesia became the first country to share its Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) data, which tracks location and activities of commercial fishing boats, with Global Fishing Watch which uses tools like satellite imagery to monitor environmental issues.While the move is praised by conservationists for its potential to deter illegal fishing, some observers argue that publishing the data will backfire on the location of Indonesia’s best fisheries.Supporters of the policy refute the claims saying that it will help Indonesian authorities intercept any sign of violations on the country’s oceans, and boost compliance among fishing businesses in sustainable marine and fisheries. JAKARTA — Not everyone supports the Indonesian government’s decision to publish information on the location of fishing boats in its waters, via data mapping platform Global Fishing Watch, accessible to anyone with a computer. The move, aimed at countering illegal fishing, has earned a backlash from some observers, who say it may prove “counterproductive.”In June, Indonesia became the first country to share its Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) data with Global Fishing Watch, a partnership between Google, conservation group Oceana, and SkyTruth, which uses tools like satellite imagery to monitor environmental issues. The platform provides both general data for the public and more detailed information seen only by authorities.A screenshot from Global Fishing Watch, showing locations of Indonesian fishing vessels in the country’s waters.The move was praised by conservationists for its potential to deter illegal fishing. But some argue that publishing the data will reveal the location of Indonesia’s best fisheries, creating a run on the resources that further depletes them.“Without any access restrictions to the data, fishing vessels will likely rush to sail to locations with the most fishing vessels, and this will result in massive exploitation of marine natural resources,” said Marthin Hadiwinata of the Indonesian Traditional Fishermen’s Union (KNTI). “Isn’t that going to end up becoming unsustainable instead?”Indonesian fishing vessels have long been required to share location data with the government. A 2008 regulation requires VMS to be installed on all fishing boats with a capacity of at least 30 gross tons, or averaging about 16 meters or more. The system transmits data showing the activity and pinpoint position of the boat as it sails across the country’s waters and parts of the Indian Ocean.Now, that information can be accessed by anyone via Global Fishing Watch. With the data from Indonesia, the tool can now analyze the behavior and movement of nearly 5,000 vessels.Alan F. Koropitan, an oceanography professor from Indonesia’s Bogor Agricultural University, said he supports transparency. But he called publishing VMS data “ill-advised.” Such “raw” and “strictly confidential” information could be assimilated by foreign companies for personal gain, including projecting Indonesia’s fisheries industry in the future, he said.“It can lead to data misuse by irresponsible parties and subsequently prove counterproductive to our national fisheries management and marine conservation,” Koropitan said.A commercial Indonesian fishing boat. Photo by James Gagen/Wikimedia Commons.Fishing businesses tend to be discreet about where they fish in order to prevent others from exploiting those sites, Hadiwinata said.He raised fears that foreign experts and governments equipped with advanced maritime apparatus could exploit information on Indonesia’s natural resources and traditional knowledge without local fishers’ consent.The Indonesian government refutes the claims, citing that the public only receives general, three-day-old data, while more detailed information, including a ship’s identity and tonnage, is exclusively for the authorities for law enforcement and legal purposes.“We don’t think it’s ‘counterproductive’ because everything now is well-supervised, so any indication of a violation can be intercepted,” said Goenaryo, director of monitoring at the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries.The data, he said, would actually help the government identify “more-structured patterns of violations” by fishing boats.Arifsyah Nasution, ocean campaigner at Greenpeace, also rebuffed arguments against publishing VMS data, saying it would in fact boost compliance among fishing vessels in sustainable marine and fisheries.He described the policy as “revolutionary,” saying it could underpin widespread reformation for a better fisheries management in both regional and global scopes.“It establishes a strong and transparent partnership between governments in order to fundamentally, comprehensively, and effectively eradicate illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, including slavery at sea and human right abuse in fisheries,” he said.The fisheries ministry said the government had “wisely” taken “all aspects” into account before making the decision to part with VMS data, and insisted on its benefit in allowing the public to serve as a watchdog.“The main goal [of this initiative] is to monitor [Indonesian] sustainable fisheries resources so that anyone who wishes to commit any IUU-related violation will refrain from doing it because all eyes are now watching,” Goenaryo said.President Joko Widodo made the oceans a top priority when he took office in 2014. He has taken aggressive measures to clamp down on illegal and unreported fishing through policies like banning foreign-made vessels from operating in the country’s waters and blowing up poachers’ boats.“If fishing businesses conduct accordingly to the regulations, why should they feel worried about being watched over?” Goenaryo said.Other nations should share their VMS data too in order to boost transparency and end illegal fishing, fisheries minister Susi Pudjiastuti said at a recent UN conference in New York.“Illegal fishing is an international problem, and countering it requires cross-border cooperation between countries,” she said.Peru is the only other country that has vowed to publish its VMS data, but it is yet to share it on Global Fishing Watch. Indonesia and Peru are among the world’s top five fishing nations. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Fisheries, Fishing, Governance, Illegal Fishing, Mapping, Marine, Marine Conservation, Monitoring, Oceans, Transparency last_img read more

New research shows why forests are absolutely essential to meeting Paris Climate Agreement goals

first_imgIt’s widely acknowledged that keeping what’s left of the world’s forests standing is crucial to combating climate change. But a suite of new research published last week shows that forests have an even larger role to play in achieving the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement than was previously thought.In order to meet those goals, the global economy will have to be swiftly decarbonized. According to a new report from the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC), by taking aggressive action to protect and rehabilitate tropical forests, we could buy ourselves more time to make this transition.Deforestation is responsible for about 10 percent of global emissions, but removing that source of emissions is only half the value of forests to global climate action. Other research shows that planting trees and rehabilitating degraded forests is just as critical to climate efforts as stopping deforestation, because of how reforestation efforts can enhance forests’ role as a carbon sink. By now, it’s widely acknowledged that keeping what’s left of the world’s forests standing is crucial to combating climate change. But a suite of new research published last week shows that forests have an even larger role to play in achieving the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement than was previously thought.The research was released on the eve of the annual United Nations climate conference (the twenty-third conference of the parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, or COP23), which kicked off in Bonn, Germany on November 6.The UN’s program for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, known as REDD, was included in the Paris Agreement as a standalone article, signaling its importance to broader efforts by the international community to halt global warming. The Agreement was signed by nearly 200 countries in December 2015 and set a goal of “keeping a global temperature rise this century well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5 degrees Celsius.”In order to meet those targets, the global economy will have to be swiftly decarbonized and the use of fossil fuels sharply curtailed, while the use of clean, renewable energy will need to be scaled up just as rapidly. According to a new report from the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC), by taking aggressive action to protect and rehabilitate tropical forests, we could buy ourselves more time to make this transition.“[E]nding tropical forest loss, improving tropical forest management, and restoring 500 million hectares of tropical forests could reduce sufficient emissions to provide 10-15 years of additional time to dramatically reduce our use of fossil fuels,” the report states. “The potential is even larger if the role of the entire land use sector is considered.”Deforestation is responsible for about 10 percent of global emissions. But removing that source of emissions is only half the value of forests to global climate action. Restoring degraded forests has come to be recognized as perhaps just as critical to climate efforts as stopping deforestation, because of how reforestation efforts can enhance forests’ role as a carbon sink.While forests currently remove an estimated 30 percent of manmade carbon emissions from the atmosphere, they could be sequestering far more. If we allow young secondary forests to regrow and improve forest management in addition to stopping deforestation, WHRC notes, “the cumulative size of the forest sink could increase by 100 billion metric tons of carbon by the year 2100 — significantly larger than it is today.” That’s roughly equivalent to the amount of emissions we create in a decade through our use of fossil fuels.“We cannot meet the Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting warming to 1.5 °C without utilizing the potential of forests and agricultural soils to store more carbon,” said Philip Duffy, WHRC’s president and executive director. “This requires avoiding future emissions as well as using these resources to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. The relatively small net CO2 emissions from land use—about 10 percent of total human emissions—is the difference between much larger emissions and removals. This masks the great potential of forests and soils to contribute to climate mitigation.”Ending deforestation and replanting forests just as important as weaning ourselves from fossil fuelsThere are actually three distinct activities, besides stopping deforestation, that can boost forests’ role in halting global warming: afforestation, or planting trees on land that was not previously forest; reforestation, in which forests are replanted on land that had been forest in the past; and forest restoration, which involves planting new trees to improve the health of a degraded forest.Another report, also released last week, by Forest Climate Analytics, looks at large-scale afforestation, reforestation, and restoration efforts in China, India, and South Korea. Through their tree planting efforts, these three countries removed more than 12 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere over the past two decades, according to the report, providing “evidence for the scale of carbon removals that are achievable through active interventions centered on tree planting and maintenance.”“The experience of China — which produces more carbon emissions than any other country — is especially noteworthy, as reforestation programs there not only removed CO2 from the atmosphere and increased forest cover by more than 50 percent, but also provided additional income to rural communities and ensured that forests provide critical ecosystem services that support agricultural productivity,” Michael Wolosin, Forest Climate Analytics’ president and the author of the report, said in a statement.Yet another piece of research — a working paper co-authored by Martin Herold of Wageningen University in The Netherlands — further underscores the point that forests are just as important to halting global temperature rises as weaning ourselves off of fossil fuels. Herold and his colleagues estimate that there is 40 percent more carbon stored in Earth’s forests as there is in all known fossil fuel deposits around the world. In fact, the researchers say, there is five times more carbon currently stored in forests than we can pump into Earth’s atmosphere and still meet the 2°C target.“Releasing this carbon into the atmosphere through continuing deforestation not only commits us to the worst impacts of climate change, but also results in the loss of a globally important carbon sink,” Herold said in a statement. “People often misunderstand the longevity of forests — sure, individual trees die, but forests naturally grow back. As long as the land use does not change, forests are a permanent fixture of the earth’s carbon sequestering architecture. Protecting the carbon stored in forests is no different than taking action to ensure fossil deposits stay underground.”One major hurdle to overcome: Funding to keep forests standing is lagging severely behind the financing made available to industries, especially agriculture, that contribute most to deforestation. Total investments aimed at stopping deforestation represent just $2.3 billion of the $167 billion that multilateral institutions and developed countries have committed to climate change mitigation efforts since 2010. That’s less than 1.5 percent of climate mitigation funds, according to a report by Climate Focus. Over that same time period, financing for business-as-usual agricultural practices has been nearly 40 times more abundant than the funds provided for forest protection, per the report.“As countries work to make good on their commitments under the global climate agreement, we need to look at where we’ve already had success in reducing carbon in the atmosphere by protecting and growing forests,” Forest Climate Analytics’ Wolosin said. “China’s example shows that we don’t need to wait for a future technological fix for carbon removal. Forests are a natural carbon removal technology—and one that is proven and available immediately to be deployed at a large scale. Without significant leadership from policy makers, this moment of opportunity to realize the full mitigation potential of forests and lands could be lost.”Deforestation for oil palm in Sabah, Malaysia. Agriculture is one of the main drivers of tropical deforestation. Photo by Rhett Butler.CITATIONSClimate Focus. (2017). Progress on the New York Declaration on Forests: Finance for Forests – Goals 8 and 9 Assessment Report. Prepared by Climate Focus in cooperation with the New York Declaration on Forest Assessment Partners with support from the Climate and Land Use Alliance.Houghton, R. A., Birdsey, R. A., Nassikas, A., & McGlinchey, D. (2017). Forests and Land Use: Undervalued Assets for Global Climate Stabilization: Why protecting and restoring forests and promoting sustainable agriculture and land use is more important than ever for the future of our planet. Woods Hole Research Center.Wolosin, M. (2017). Large-scale Forestation for Climate Mitigation: Lessons from South Korea, China and India. Forest Climate Analytics.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Carbon Emissions, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Change Policy, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Mitigation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Redd, Reforestation, Research, Soil Carbon, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

RSPO tops among certification schemes, though all must improve: report

first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor Banner image: Oil palm fruit in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Certification, Environment, Forestry, Governance, Indigenous Peoples, Land Grabbing, Palm Oil, Plantations Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A new report from the Forest Peoples Programme ranks certification schemes for biofuels and edible oils.The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil topped the NGO’s rankings, although it too has significant problems.“It seems that about half of RSPO members’ palm oil sold in Europe, mostly for biofuels, is…not RSPO-certified. For those concerned about human rights and social justice, this is very troubling,” FPP campaigner Marcus Colchester said. The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil has the strongest set of requirements among certification schemes for edible oils and biofuels, even if its members often get away with flouting its standards. That’s the main conclusion of a new report from the Forest Peoples Programme (FPP), an international NGO.The RSPO is the world’s largest association for ethical production of palm oil, found in everything from ice cream to laundry detergent.It was formed in 2004 in response to a growing recognition that oil palm expansion was fueling rainforest destruction and land grabbing in countries like Indonesia, where legal protections for the environment and indigenous communities were seen as weak, enforcement of the law even weaker.Companies that join the RSPO pledge to adhere to a stronger set of standards, improving their image in the eyes of consumers. The RSPO prohibits clearance of ancient rainforests and carbon-rich peatlands, and it bans planting community lands without that community’s consent.The RSPO’s membership also includes firms that refine and use palm oil, as well as banks and NGOs like the FPP.The FPP’s report ranks the certification schemes as follows:Roundtable on Sustainable Palm OilRoundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials (RSB)Sustainable Agriculture Network (SAN)International Sustainability & Carbon Certification (ISCC)Malaysian Sustainable Palm Oil (MSPO)Indonesian Sustainable Palm Oil (ISPO) ISPO is the Indonesian government’s official certification scheme. It is essentially a stamp of approval that a company is following Indonesian law. The FPP noted that ISPO “provides very little protection of human rights and community livelihoods.”“The schemes vary a lot,” Angus McInnes, the report’s author, said in a statement. “None is perfect and all could benefit from adopting some stronger provisions from competing schemes. RSPO now provides the most robust standard for oil palm certification, although there are still some gaps. The main challenge for RSPO is to ensure RSPO members actually apply the standard in practice.”Indonesia and Malaysia are responsible for nearly all the world’s palm oil production, although the industry is expanding to other countries, especially in Latin America and Africa, as it runs out of land in the Southeast Asian nations.India and the EU are the biggest importers. China and the U.S. are major palm oil consumers, too.“The European biofuels market by and large relies on the ISCC certification scheme to fulfil EU requirements,” FPP campaigner Marcus Colchester said in a statement. “Although precise figures are not available, it seems that about half of RSPO members’ palm oil sold in Europe, mostly for biofuels, is ISCC- and not RSPO-certified. For those concerned about human rights and social justice, this is very troubling as the ISCC standard, while quite strong on environmental requirements, falls way below the RSPO standard on social protections.”last_img read more

PSL hires two Thai referees for Grand Prix finals

first_imgP260,000 each in aid to displaced Marawi folk released by US Sarah Geronimo’s ‘Tala’ enters Billboard’s world digital song sales chart Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption MOST READ “While we are very satisfied with the performance of our local referees, the participation of guest referees from Thailand would definitely spice up the finals series. Aside from that, allowing foreign guest-referees also put the PSL in the community of leagues that strictly adheres to fair play and respect to the sport,” he said.The PSL has been bringing in foreign referees during conference finals the past four years.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubs“With the guest referees and the video challenge system, we’re looking forward to a fair, just and exciting finals series. We’re glad to have Mr. Gettaworn and Mr. Pumduang on board,” Juico said. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. ‘Duterte legacy:’ Gov’t boasts achievements so far Duterte says he will appoint Gamboa as next PNP chief Sting of finals loss fuels San Miguel’s drive to another All-Filipino title Comelec assures no disruption in operations with retirement of execscenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption PLAY LIST 02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award03:05Malakanyang bilib sa Phivolcs | Chona Yu Tim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’ Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college MANILA, Philippines–The Philippine Superliga will employ two Thai referees for the best-of-three championship series between Petron and F2 Logistics starting on Tuesday at FilOil Flying V Center.International refs Komsun Gettaworn and Jirasak Pumduang are set to arrive Monday, according to PSL chair Philip Ella Juico.ADVERTISEMENT Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

Naomi Osaka’s body language tells story of her shaky US Open start

first_imgDutch YouTube star Nikkie de Jager says she is transgender Naomi Osaka, of Japan, returns a shot to Anna Blinkova, of Russia, during the first round of the US Open tennis tournament Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Michael Owens)NEW YORK — Naomi Osaka put her right hand in the shape of a gun and pointed two fingers at her temple. She had just dropped the second set, moments after wasting a match point, as her U.S. Open title defense got off to a shaky start Tuesday.Her body language told the story: the eye rolls, the kneeling at the baseline, the balled-up fists covering her face at a changeover, the racket resting atop her head.ADVERTISEMENT ‘Homeland’ star Patinkin lauds intelligence community 3 young volunteers die in car crash after giving aid to Taal evacuees Lakers, NBA investigating threat claim against DeMarcus Cousins Back in Arthur Ashe Stadium, where she beat Serena Williams in last year’s chaotic final, the No. 1-seeded Osaka kept digging holes and kept climbing out of them, eventually emerging with a 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-2 victory over 84th-ranked Anna Blinkova of Russia in the first round.“I don’t think I’ve ever been this nervous in my life,” Osaka told the crowd during her post-match interview. “For me, I just came off really slow and I never really found my rhythm.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAllen Durham chews out Meralco: Everybody played like sh*tSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsThe 21-year-old from Japan wore a black sleeve over her left knee, which has been an issue recently.But it wasn’t so much her movement as her erratic strokes that presented problems for Osaka, who finished with 50 unforced errors, more than double Blinkova’s total of 22. LATEST STORIES Osaka has spoken rather openly about the struggles she’s had dealing with pressure and expectations this season. She said Tuesday that she hoped figuring out how to get past Blinkova — who is now 0-2 at the U.S. Open and 0-4 against top-10 opponents — would boost her moving forward.“It helps me a lot, because I learn from the tougher matches,” Osaka said. “It helps me be prepared and try to learn and adjust my game plan.”CANADA VS. CANADADenis Shapovalov and Felix Auger-Aliassime are friends and countrymen — and destined to be perennial opponents at the U.S. Open, it seems.The two up-and-coming Canadians, young and talented and considered among the best players of tennis’ next generation, met in the first round at Flushing Meadows for the second year in a row. And it was Shapovalov who advanced for the second year in a row.On Tuesday, the flashy, left-handed Shapovalov, who is 20 years old and ranked 33rd, put together a whopping 28-9 advantage in total winners on the way to a 6-1, 6-1, 6-4 victory against Auger-Aliassime, who is 19 and seeded 18th.In 2018, Shapovalov advanced to the second round when Auger-Aliassime stopped playing because his heart was racing.MOVING AHNEleven years later, Kristie Ahn finally got back into the U.S. Open.She’s going to play at least one more match after knocking out a past champion. Mandatory evacuation enforced in Lemery Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo hits Mocha over false post: Why let gov’t pay a fake news purveyor? Priyanka Chopra Jonas joining Amazon’s spy series ‘Citadel’ MOST READ BREAKING: DOJ indicts ex-PNP chief Albayalde for graft During the professional era, which began in 1968, only two U.S. Open women’s champions have lost in the first round the following year: It happened in 2005 to Svetlana Kuznetsova and again in 2017 to Angelique Kerber — who was beaten by none other than Osaka, ranked 45th at the time and yet to get past the third round at a major tournament.Osaka thought back to that match Tuesday.“I could kind of see how stressed out (Kerber) was and that was in my favor,” Osaka recalled. “I don’t want to give people that look.”This victory, difficult as it was, stretched Osaka’s winning streak in hard-court Grand Slam matches to 15, which includes her run to the titles at Flushing Meadows in 2018 and at the Australian Open in January.Those helped her become the first Japanese tennis player to be ranked No. 1, a spot she regained this month.ADVERTISEMENT Ahn beat 2004 winner Svetlana Kuznetsova 7-5, 6-2, advancing to the second round two years after she thought her pro tennis career would be over.Ahn qualified for the tournament in 2008 at age 16, but didn’t collect her prize money so she could remain an amateur and play at Stanford, where she helped the Cardinal win the 2013 championship.Her parents agreed to support her quest to make a career in tennis afterward, with the understanding she’d stop by the end of 2017. But Ahn doesn’t seem like someone ready for the business world with her tennis career taking off.She lost during U.S. Open qualifying the last three years. But she earned a spot this year by winning the U.S. Open wild card challenge.After her victory Tuesday, she gave her laundry to her parents, who live nearby, now that she’s hanging around a little longer.“My Dad was like, ‘So, this is a bit of a problem,’” Ahn said. “I’m like, ‘Oh boy, here we go. He goes, ‘How are you going to get into corporate America if you keep winning?’ He’s like very keen on me like, hanging up my racket, getting a 9-to-5 job or whatever. But I’m going to try to milk this as long as I can.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next 2 buses bound for SEA Games opening collide in Bulacan PLAY LIST 00:412 buses bound for SEA Games opening collide in Bulacan01:26Filipino culture takes spotlight as 2019 SEA Games officially opens01:02Fans fill up Philippine Arena for SEA Games opening03:05Malakanyang bilib sa Phivolcs | Chona Yu01:26Homes destroyed after Taal Volcano eruption02:48ABS-CBN franchise has ‘natural deadline,’ no need for quo warranto — Gatchalian03:06Tahimik, Mapanganib | Jong Manlapaz00:49Sweet! Indian bakers make world’s ‘longest’ cake02:44Gatchalian wants arrest for residents returning to Taal danger zones Taal Volcano’s quakes, cracks send more people fleeing View commentslast_img read more