Cattle industry lags behind in addressing impact on deforestation

first_imgSupply chain transparency is especially difficult in the cattle industry because cattle frequently change hands, unlike soy or oil palm crops that remain stationary for years.While some major cattle companies have taken strides toward sustainability, they still lack sufficient support from the industry as a whole.While consumers are increasingly pushing for deforestation-free palm oil and other products, consumer pressure for change in the cattle industry hasn’t been as significant. In almost every aisle of the grocery store, you can find products from the palm oil, soy, wood, and cattle industries. Together, these industries are responsible for more than a third of tropical deforestation annually, according to the non-profit organization Forest Trends. While strides have been made by all four industries toward establishing deforestation-free commodity supply chains, the cattle industry has lagged behind the others.In a 2016 survey of more than 550 major companies with ties to these commodities, Forest Trends found that 61 percent of companies active in palm oil made commitments to cleaning up their chains, compared to only 15 percent of those active in the cattle industry. Yet cattle products are responsible for at least ten percent more deforestation than palm.Beef cattle are the largest commodity driver of deforestation globally, according to the think tank Global Canopy Programme (GCP) in its report “Sleeping Giants of Deforestation,” released in December 2016. GCP also highlighted the cattle industry’s inertia compared with other forest-linked industries. According to the report, the cattle industry remains the largest commodity driver of deforestation, but only about a quarter of companies that operate within the cattle product supply chain have policies in place regarding environmental impacts.The Union of Concerned Scientists has also pointed to the massive deforestation caused by cattle beef – more than twice as much as the other major industries of soybeans, palm oil, and wood products.According to some NGOs and industry players, this inertia may be connected to the complexity of cattle supply chains, low consumer demand for deforestation-free cattle products, and a lack of industry unity.Supply chain complexityJBS runs the world’s largest slaughterhouse and meat processing operation and is one of Brazil’s biggest beef producers. The company employs more than 230,000 people globally, according to their website. It buys cattle daily so that they’re fresh for the slaughter, choosing from a pool of about 70,000 suppliers, according to the company. Of those, 40,000 are in the Amazon. There’s a difficulty, however, in that parts of the region are connected to cattle industry-linked deforestation.Marcio Nappo, sustainability director of Brazilian beef processor JBS, explains that this is partially tied to the complexities of the cattle supply chain. In the daily shuffle of searching for cattle suppliers, slaughterhouses can lose control.Two cows graze in South America. Photo by Marcelo César Augusto Romeo via Flickr“I cannot control my raw materials; it is a pure commodity market, driven by price,” Nappo said. “I don’t have any idea who will be my supplier tomorrow.”JBS is part of the Cattle Agreement, which several major producers signed on to about seven years ago as a part of a pledge to be deforestation-free. But according to Nappo, constant uncertainty in supply chain factors make effective monitoring difficult. An assessment in 2015 of actors in the agreement found that JBS had made “substantial changes” to its procurement criteria.Simon Hall, tropical forest and agriculture program manager for the nonprofit National Wildlife Federation (NWF), agrees that this daily shuffle is a particular obstacle to the cattle industry. According to Hall, soy, paper, and palm oil companies have greater control and stability in terms of suppliers.For example, whereas soy processers often have long-term contractual relationships with farmers, the cattle industry operates largely through one-off transactions. It can be more difficult to get buy-in from producers and change practices on the ground when there aren’t strong supply chain relationships, he said.Soy, palm, or timber crops also take several months or years to grow in a stationary lot, making them a little simpler to track, but cattle frequently changes hands. That makes it harder to track its source and ensure that it is deforestation-free.“The field of soy isn’t going to up and move to the municipality next door, but cattle move around and can be transferred to different areas,” Hall said. He added that an animal is often sold for slaughter when it’s about 40 months old, yet it may have only spent the last three or four months of its life at the ranch from which the slaughterhouse bought it.According to Carlos Saviani, WWF’s vice president of sustainable food, such transfers can be numerous.“One animal… before it reaches a slaughterhouse can pass through 10 different properties,” Saviani said. “It could be born in one farm, weaned in another farm, it could be raised until a year and half in another farm, and then it could go to auction and be sold to a feedlot. You have people that buy cattle and aggregate cattle from smaller producers into a larger farm.”Supply monitoringEfforts by companies like JBS to monitor their suppliers for deforestation often only extend to direct suppliers. JBS uses satellite imagery and other geospatial tracking technologies to check up on its direct suppliers daily to make sure no new land has been cleared, according to the company. But it cannot ensure that the several different properties the cattle passed through – via indirect suppliers – have not contributed to deforestation.Though Saviani praises the work of JBS and other companies that have invested in monitoring their direct suppliers, he said that indirect suppliers may still be responsible for much deforestation. He also said that more comprehensive tracking has been accomplished in other regions, like Uruguay and North America. But it is not yet industry-wide.For example, in Uruguay, each animal is tagged with an individual chip that records every move it has made from birth to slaughterhouse. This chip links into a government-run database.NWF’s Hall notes that he is working with other NGOs and cattle industry players in Brazil to improve tracking. That includes a data tracking system currently in place nationwide to track vaccinations for hoof and mouth disease. It doesn’t track individual animals, but rather batches of animals, so it isn’t as comprehensive as the system in Uruguay.The goal is to integrate deforestation information into this vaccination tracking system. It will still take some work to figure out the technical details, but Hall is hopeful that this will soon allow companies to track the movement of cattle from birth to slaughter and to make sure each ranch the cattle passes through is deforestation-free.Lack of consumer pressurePerception also plays a role in an aspect critical for accountability: public pressure. Forest Trends found in its survey of major companies with ties to forest-linked commodities that cattle companies had less fear of losing customers due to deforestation than the companies in other commodity industries. It reported that 54 percent of timber and pulp companies fear backlash from customers if they support deforestation practices; 52 percent of palm companies expressed the same worry; 41 percent of soy companies; and 36 percent of cattle companies.Retailers have put some pressure on slaughterhouses and ranchers to prevent deforestation. For example, Walmart and other major grocers in Brazil have committed in recent years to sourcing zero-deforestation beef.Beef for sale in the grocery story. Photo by Karamo via PixabayBut compared to other forest commodities, Saviani said, various links in the cattle industry still lag behind. The Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) has about 3,000 members, while the Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (GRSB) has about 70 members. The RSPO was formed in 2003, while the GRSB is only four years old.Hall, from NWF, said that NGOs have also been working longer on raising awareness about deforestation in the paper industry than in the cattle industry. Cattle products are now receiving more attention in this regard, but it will take time for consumer awareness to catch up.Industry unityNeither the GRSB nor the various national roundtables on sustainable beef have started certifying products, though they have set some indicators and criteria to measure progress. The Forest Trends report noted that certification in other commodities, such as that provided by the RSPO, can help companies measure their progress and communicate it to consumers.“Certification schemes provide a turnkey option toward sustainability that many companies are pursuing,” the report states.The stand against deforestation is not an industry norm when it comes to cattle products, which makes it harder for individual cattle companies to compete when they commit to it, according to JBS’s Nappo. He said they have lost a lot of suppliers.He added that in contrast, the entire soy industry in Brazil has collectively made a zero-deforestation commitment. The trade association does the monitoring, taking the burden off individual companies. Without similar industry support, JBS is left to provide not only its own monitoring but also its own support infrastructure to help its suppliers improve.The Forest Trends report notes just that, stating that, “In spite of … criticisms [that certification criteria are sometimes inadequate], development of certification schemes may offer an opportunity for more companies with … cattle exposure to establish initial deforestation-related commitments and increase ambition over time.”Banner image: Cattle at one of the 70,000 suppliers used by JBS, one of Brazil’s largest beef producers. Photo courtesy of JBSTara MacIsaac is a freelance journalist and editor for Epoch Times. She is based in Canada and you can find her on Twitter at @TaraMacIsaacBackground Information:Forest Trends, “Tracking Corporate Commitments to Deforestation Free Supply Chains,” 2016.Gibbs, H.K., Munger, J., L’Roe, J., Barreto, P., Pereira, R., Christie, M., Amaral, T. and Walker, N.F. (2015). “Did Ranchers and Slaughterhouses Respond to Zero Deforestation Agreements in the Brazilian Amazon?” Conservation Letters.RSPA Beef RoundtableFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Cattle, Commodity Roundtables, Deforestation, Forests, Rainforests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

New research shows role ancient peoples might have played in shaping Amazon rainforest

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored While the extent to which mankind has influenced the Amazon is a topic of much heated debate, a common assumption is that whether a species thrived in a particular area or not was determined mostly by the process of natural selection.But a research team that used data from more than 1,000 forest surveys to study forest composition at over 3,000 archaeological sites across the Amazon found that species domesticated by pre-Columbian peoples were five times as likely to be “hyperdominant” as non-domesticated species.“This lays to rest the long-standing myth of the ’empty Amazon’,” said Charles Clement, a senior researcher at Brazil’s National Institute for Amazonian Research (INPA) and a co-author of the study. It’s common for conservationists to talk about preserving nature in a “pristine” or “unspoiled” state, but new research might complicate a simple definition of these terms, at least when it comes to the Amazon.There are close to 12,000 known species of trees in the Amazon, and scientists estimate that there are probably 4,000 more that we haven’t yet discovered, meaning that the best guess is that the Amazon harbors a total of about 16,000 tree species.While the extent to which mankind has influenced the Amazon is a topic of much heated debate, a common assumption is that whether a species thrived in a particular area or not was determined mostly by the process of natural selection. But according to a study published in the journal Science this month, the Amazon rainforests we seek to protect from the impacts of human activities today were shaped, at least in part, by indigenous peoples thousands of years ago.“Some of the tree species that are abundant in Amazonian forests today, like cacao, açaí, and Brazil nut, are probably common because they were planted by people who lived there long before the arrival of European colonists,” Nigel Pitman, the Mellon Senior Conservation Ecologist at Chicago’s Field Museum and a co-author of the study, said in a statement.Pitman was part of a research team that used data from more than 1,000 forest surveys to study forest composition at over 3,000 archaeological sites across the Amazon. By overlaying the data with a map of the sites, the team was able to look at how pre-Columbian peoples might have influenced the diversity and distribution of trees in the Amazon.A new study found that tree species domesticated by pre-Columbian Amazonian peoples are five times as likely to be “hyperdominant” as non-domesticated species. Photo © Daniel Sabatier.The team focused on 85 tree species cultivated by Amazonian peoples over the last several millennia for food, shelter, and other uses. They write in the study that “Domesticated species are five times more likely than nondomesticated species to be hyperdominant.” Throughout the Amazon Basin, the researchers found, “the relative abundance and richness of domesticated species increase in forests on and around archaeological sites… Our analyses indicate that modern tree communities in Amazonia are structured to an important extent by a long history of plant domestication by Amazonian peoples.”Pitman added: “That’s even the case for some really remote, mature forests that we’d typically assumed to be pristine and undisturbed.”“This lays to rest the long-standing myth of the ’empty Amazon’,” Charles Clement, a senior researcher at Brazil’s National Institute for Amazonian Research (INPA) and a co-author of the study, said in a statement. “Early European naturalists reported scattered indigenous populations living in huge and apparently virgin forests, and that idea has continued to fascinate the media, policy makers, development planners and even some scientists. This study confirms that even areas of the Amazon that look empty today are crowded with ancient footprints.”Carolina Levis, a PhD student at Brazil’s National Institute for Amazonian Research and Wagenigen University and Research in the Netherlands, led the research team, which was comprised of hundreds of ecologists and social scientists from around the world.An archeological dig site in the Amazon. Photo © Val Moraes/Central Amazon Project.Levis says that ecological studies have traditionally ignored the influence of pre-Columbian peoples on today’s forests, but that her team’s findings show why this is nonetheless an important line of inquiry.“We found that a quarter of these domesticated tree species are widely distributed in the basin and dominate large expanses of forest,” she said. “These species are vital for the livelihood and economy of Amazonian peoples and indicate that the Amazonian flora is in part a surviving heritage of its former inhabitants.”Levis and team caution that we still have a lot to learn about how mankind might have affected the species composition of the largest rainforest in the world, however. For one thing, it’s not clear what impacts more recent Amazonian settlements have had on the distribution and abundance of domesticated species that we can observe today. And while some regions, like Southwestern Amazonia, were found to have particularly high concentrations and diversities of these species (such as Brazil nut trees, which remain a staple of local residents’ livelihoods to this day), other regions, like the Guiana Shield, were found to harbor far fewer of the 85 species studied.Compared to the 16,000 tree species believed to exist in the Amazon, studying just 85 species may appear to be a relatively small sample, but Levis and her co-authors say it is a sufficient number to demonstrate significant human influence. In fact, the researchers note that, because there are hundreds of other Amazonian tree species known to have been managed by pre-Colombian peoples, human impact on the Amazon might be even greater than their study has shown.Flávia Costa, another researcher with INPA who was also a study co-author, said that these findings “have important implications for conservation,” especially given the fact that many of these domesticated tree species are still crucial to the livelihoods of Amazonian peoples, even while the Amazon continues to face severe threats from deforestation and degradation, road-building, mining, and other impacts of modern human industry.“We have shown that the southwestern and eastern regions concentrate the most domesticated species, and these are the regions where most forest degradation and loss is occurring,” Costa said. “Southwestern and eastern Amazonia may not be considered classical biodiversity hotspots, but should be top conservation priorities as reservoirs of high value forests for human populations.”It’s not clear what impacts more recent Amazonian settlements have had on the distribution and abundance of domesticated species that we can observe today. Photo © Eglee Zent.CITATIONLevis, C., Costa, F. R., Bongers, F., Peña-Claros, M., Clement, C. R., Junqueira, A. B., … & Castilho, C. V. (2017). Persistent effects of pre-Columbian plant domestication on Amazonian forest composition. Science, 355(6328), 925-931. doi:10.1126/science.aal0157Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon People, Amazon Rainforest, Environment, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Rainforests, Research, Trees, Tropical Forests center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Mapping indigenous lands in Indonesia’s tallest mountains

first_imgLocal NGOs in the Baliem Valley of Indonesia’s Papua province are working with indigenous peoples to map their customary territories.Over the past two decades, one foundation has mapped 19 of the 27 customary territories in Papua’s Jayawijaya district.Some communities who were initially suspicious of the program have decided to trust it. ASOLOKOBAL, Indonesia — Laurensius Lani’s footsteps can be heard at dawn alongside the traditional honay thatched-roof houses of the Baliem Valley, here in the archipelago country’s eastermost Papua province.This is a region of biodiversity and riches. Asolokobal sits on the southern end of Indonesia’s sole snow-covered mountain range. Tasmanian tigers (Thylacinus cynocephalus), long thought to be extinct in the wild, were said to be spotted here not long ago. Yet, 125 miles north along the Jayawijaya range is the world’s largest copper and gold mine, operated by U.S. company Freeport-McMoRan.Since 1996, Lani has worked with the Foundation for the Customary Development of Walesi (YBAW), a local NGO, to map indigenous peoples’ customary lands. He sees such mapping as the first step towards empowering these communities to use their land sustainably. The lack of clearly delineated boundaries is a big problem in Indonesia, one often taken advantage of by large companies trying to acquire community lands for development.Over the last 20 years, the foundation has mapped 19 of the 27 customary territories here in Jayawijaya district – not easy work given the many peaks in Indonesia’s highest altitude region. Jayawijaya customary lands include Mount Trikora (4,750 meters/15,600 feet above sea level), Mount Mandala (4,700 meters above sea level), Mount Yamin (4,500 meters above sea level) and Lake Habema (3,200 meters above sea level). These magnificent land features sit in Lorenz National Park — the largest national park in Southeast Asia.The territories the team has mapped range from the enormous (26,000-hectare Inyarek; 22,000-hectare Uelesi; and 18,000-hectare Aluama) to the minute (Tuma, which is wedged alongside the Uelesi region).“I started advocating for local rights after returning from Jayapura,” Lani explained, referring to the provincial capital. “With technological advances, many locals are choosing to sell their land; our forest and people are beginning to change.” Lani said this trend was not isolated. It is happening in Wamena and other areas of Jayawijaya too.Jayawijayans traditionally regard the earth and forest as their “mother,” entities that feed, contain and nurture. From this perspective, the sale of the very earth and land seem especially sad to Lani, who is keenly aware that natural resources are finite.“Mapping is one means to preserve local rights. If we manage our lands, there will be a legacy for our children and grandchildren to inherit. After all, the earth and forest itself does not get longer or wider, or have its own offspring. Man does.”A cluster of honai dwellings in Papua’s Jayawijaya district. Photo by Wahyu Mulyono for MongabayGovernment offices in Jayawijaya and Jakarta have supported Lani’s foundation and its mapping initiative, since so much conflict — both interethnic and that pitting communities against companies and the state — is related to disputes over land and forest ownership. “With territories mapped, people have a clearer idea of boundaries and better sense of areas they are not allowed to enter,” said Yunus Matuan, the head of Jayawijaya’s Forestry Office. “If all the indigenous lands were mapped, we might have zero conflict.”Once boundaries are delineated, the hope is to gather demographic data such as population size, the age and education levels of the populace, the number of ceremonial locations such as honai and the variety of infrastructure such as health centers. There are also plans to include regional planning details such as zoning for future paddy fields, livestock and agricultural lands, clean water sources, fishery and forestry sources.Natural and agricultural features are also important to note, according to Cornelis Oagay, from the Center for the Study of Community Empowerment (LSPK), a local mapping and planning institution. “After this process, we will register our maps with the national Ancestral Domain Registration Agency [BRWA],” he said. “We hope this data will enable the government to create and adjust regional regulations in a more informed, collaborative manner.”At first local communities were suspicious about the idea of mapping their territories. They worried the maps were being made in order to steal their lands. Gradually, though, the communities in different customary areas came to believe in the importance of mapping. They were especially drawn to the idea that mapping could lead to regional management plans on which they would have input.“Drawing up the customary land maps feels like the building of a strong, sturdy wall for our children and grandchildren, “said Enius Lokobal, an Asolokobal church and community leader. “If you have a fence, a set of rules and legislation, our people will feel protected and secure in our thoughts for future generations. This way, we can develop our ancestral lands in line with our own needs.”This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Nov. 17, 2016.Banner image: Local community members discuss review of a map of their area at a church in Asolokobal. Photo by Wahyu Mulyono for Mongabay Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Conservation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Forestry, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Mapping, Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Financing sustainable agriculture possible, if terms fit farmers’ needs

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Soy, Avoided Deforestation, Conservation, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Economics, Farming, Food, Food Vs Forests Debate, Forests, Gfrn, Global Forest Watch, Innovation In Conservation, Innovation In Tropical Forest Conservation, Palm Oil, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Tropical Forests Article published by John Cannon Worldwide, more deforestation results from the push for farmland than any other cause.The Global Canopy Programme reports that funding aimed at encouraging a move away from deforestation-based agriculture and toward more sustainable methods must be designed to address the needs of farmers.Loans with longer terms and lower interest rates can help farmers who are switching to sustainable agriculture survive the ‘valley of death’ – that is, the first few years of new methods before their production becomes profitable. Much of the deforestation in the world’s tropical rainforests comes so that we humans have enough to eat. But sustainable agricultural practices exist that help farmers coax more corn and soybeans, coffee and cacao, and a host of other products from the soil, without having to draw on land that’s currently covered with standing forest.The tricky part is getting those tools and techniques to farmers and finding backers to fund the transition from traditional practices to sustainable farming.“Farmers don’t have the money they need, and investors don’t know where to put their money,” said Simone Bauch, who directs the Global Canopy Programme in Latin America. The Global Canopy Programme is an Oxford, England-based think tank working at the intersection of tropical forest conservation and economics.Cocoa pods hang from a tree. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerBauch and her colleagues have just published a report that outlines how different finance approaches can streamline that shift to more environmentally friendly agriculture for smallholder producers.Research indicates around 80 percent of recent deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon was small-scale, most of which was likely done to make way for small farms. Conservationists are eager to shrink that statistic, but as Bauch and her coauthors point out, they don’t often have a nuanced understanding of finance. With the report, the team draws on four years of experience with the Unlocking Forest Finance project and illustrates how different financial tools – or “instruments” – farmers get access an assist in shifting their methods.One of the big hurdles for farmers is getting loans to cover the move to more sustainable farming practices. It’s especially a challenge that crops up with perennial plants like coffee that need about four years before revenues start to flow in – what Bauch calls the “valley of death.” But credit aimed at encouraging green farming can be tailored to this set of challenges, she said, “for example, decreasing interest rates to make them cheaper, or tweaking the terms of loans for producers.”Banks and other lenders could also extend the loan’s timeline, to perhaps 15 to 30 years, she added.“Yes, it’s longer than usual. But it’s definitely doable.”In a case study looking at small producers of cacao in the Amazonian region of San Martin in Peru, the Global Canopy Programme found that by providing lower interest rates, a one-year grace period during which farmer only had to pay interest and a longer payback term gave farmers more cash in the first few years of production. This liquidity, they argue, makes the transition to sustainable farming methods more realistic and hedges against shocks like droughts, floods and fires that could wipe out their harvests.The San Martín region of central Peru lost more than 9 percent of its tree cover between 2001 and 2015, according to satellite data from the University of Maryland. While the region still boasts tracts of intact forest landscape (IFLs) – areas of native land cover large and undisturbed enough to retain their original biodiversity levels – portions of those IFLs have been degraded since 2000. Small-scale agriculture is considered a major driver of deforestation in central Peru.Just as these schemes need to address issues for the producers, they also need to assuage the concerns of investors. Those who might otherwise be interested in footing the bill for a switch to more sustainable methods typically shy away from such ventures because they see them as “high risk, low return.”That concern is “justified,” Bauch said. “Doing something different means it’s risky.”The change in mindset requires a “shift in perception,” she said. Tools such as insurance and credit guarantees, in which an NGO or bank shoulders some of the risk of these loans, could make this type of investment more attractive.Larger companies might also agree to fund farmers ahead of time in exchange for the chance to lock in purchases of agricultural commodities in what’s known as “an off-take agreement.” This pact helps to address a concern that Bauch has heard from large buyers.A pilot project in the region of San Martin in Peru is underway to help smallholder farmers transition to more sustainable methods over the next 10 years. Image courtesy of the Global Canopy Programme“A lot of the big companies in supply chains such as cocoa [and] coffee, but also soy and beef, for example … complain that they don’t find sustainable producers that everyone is asking them to buy from,” she said.Bauch added that one of the key lessons from the Global Canopy Programme’s experience in Latin America and elsewhere is that a single drop-in solution is unlikely to help farmers push through to more sustainable methods.“Finance can flow through different instruments. It’s not like there’s one silver bullet that will solve all the problems,” she said. “It’s mostly what instrument fits what scenario and how can you actually get the actors together to back that instrument.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.CITATIONSGreenpeace, University of Maryland, World Resources Institute and Transparent World. “Intact Forest Landscapes. 2000/2013” Accessed through Global Forest Watch on June 2, 2017. www.globalforestwatch.orgFiner, M. & Novoa, S. (2017). Patterns and Drivers of Deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon. MAAP: Synthesis #2.Hansen, M. C., P. V. Potapov, R. Moore, M. Hancher, S. A. Turubanova, A. Tyukavina, D. Thau, S. V. Stehman, S. J. Goetz, T. R. Loveland, A. Kommareddy, A. Egorov, L. Chini, C. O. Justice, and J. R. G. Townshend. 2013. “High-Resolution Global Maps of 21st-Century Forest Cover Change.” Science 342 (15 November): 850–53. Data available on-line from:http://earthenginepartners.appspot.com/science-2013-global-forest. Accessed through Global Forest Watch on June 2, 2017. www.globalforestwatch.orgBanner photo of cocoa plants in Peru by John C. Cannon.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Audio: A rare earth mine in Madagascar triggers concerns for locals and lemurs

first_imgAcoustic, Activism, Animal Behavior, Animals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Biodiversity, Birds, Climate Change, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Coral Reefs, Conservation, Coral Bleaching, Coral Reefs, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Film, Forests, Illegal Trade, Impact Of Climate Change, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Law Enforcement, Mining, Podcast, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Our first guest on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast is Eddie Carver, a Mongabay contributor based in Madagascar who recently wrote a report about a troubled company that is hoping to mine rare earth elements in a forest on the Ampasindava peninsula, a highly biodiverse region that is home to numerous endangered lemur species.Carver speaks about the risks of mining for rare earth elements, how the mine might impact wildlife like endangered lemur species found nowhere else on Earth, the complicated history of the company and its ownership of the mine, and how villagers in nearby communities have already been impacted by exploratory mining efforts.Our second guest is Jo Wood, an Environmental Water Project Officer in Victoria, Australia, who plays for us the calls of a number of indicator species whose presence helps her assess the success of her wetland rewetting work. On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast we discuss a proposed rare earth mining project in Madagascar that worries both lemurs and locals, and we also speak with a researcher who uses acoustic ecology techniques to assess the success of wetland rewetting programs in Australia and shares with us recordings of some of the rare visitors she’s documented, listen here: Article published by Mike Gaworecki Our first guest is Eddie Carver, a Mongabay contributor based in Madagascar who recently wrote a report about a foreign-owned company called Tantalum Rare Earth Malagasy (TREM) that is hoping to mine rare earth elements in Madagascar’s Ampasindava peninsula, a highly biodiverse region that is home to numerous iconic lemur species. Rare earth elements are used in a range of electronic devices and computers, and the deposit in Madagascar’s Ampasindava peninsula is expected to be worth hundreds of millions of dollars.Part of the Ampasindava peninsula was granted protected status in 2015 — but only after TREM successfully lobbied to reduce the size of the protected area in order to safeguard the boundaries of its mining concession. We speak with Carver about the risks of mining for rare earth elements, how the mine might impact wildlife like the endemic lemur species that are found in Madagascar and nowhere else on Earth, the complicated history of TREM and its ownership of the mine, and how villagers in communities that have already been impacted by TREM’s exploratory efforts view the mining project.Our second guest is Jo Wood, an Environmental Water Project Officer with the Goulburn Broken Catchment Authority in Victoria, Australia. This Field Notes segment is particularly interesting because we’ve interviewed a number of researchers on this podcast who use bioacoustics to study changes to the environment in order to inform conservation measures, but Wood is the first one we’ve spoken with who uses bioacoustics specifically to monitor the effectiveness of a particular conservation intervention that’s already been deployed.Wood plays for us the calls of a number of indicator species whose presence, or lack thereof, helps signal the overall health of the wetlands ecosystems where she works.Here’s this episode’s top news:High volumes of ivory continue to be sold online in JapanU.K. is the world’s biggest exporter of legal ivory, data analysis showsNew study: Climate change shifts timing of floods in EuropeHarsh sentence for blogger may haunt Vietnam’s environmental movementMonkey rediscovered in Brazil after 80 years‘Tango in the Wind:’ New film captures courtship dance of critically endangered Hooded Grebe for first time everCritically endangered staghorn corals are benefiting from coral gardening in the CaribbeanIf you’d like to request email alerts when we publish new stories here on Mongabay.com on specific topics that you care about most, from forests and oceans to indigenous people’s rights and more, visit alerts.mongabay.com and sign up!Mongabay is a nonprofit and relies on the support of its readers, so if you value what you learn at the site and on this podcast, please visit mongabay.org/donate to help make it all possible.You can subscribe to our podcast on Android, Google Play, iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, or RSS.An endangered Sambirano mouse lemur (Microcebus sambiranensis), which is found only in two or three small populations in northwest Madagascar, including one on the Ampasindava peninsula. Photo by Leslie Wilmet.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

WATCH: Rare sighting of mother Sunda clouded leopard and cubs caught on film

first_imgAnimals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Cats, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecotourism, Environment, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Logging, Mammals, Poaching, Rainforest Animals, Roads, Tropical Deforestation, Video, Videos, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking On the afternoon of November 6, while traveling through Deramakot Forest Reserve in the Malaysian state of Sabah on the island of Borneo, photographer Michael Gordon came across a sight he was not expecting: a Sunda clouded leopard mother with her cubs.“When I first saw the clouded leopards from a distance I thought it was just some macaques on the road,” he told Mongabay. “Once I realized that it was actually three clouded leopards I stopped the car right away. I had my camera close by, but with only a 15mm macro lens attached. I wasn’t sure whether to just enjoy the moment or go into the boot of the car and change lenses. I figured I would regret it badly if I didn’t record it.”The Sunda clouded leopard, found only on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra, is such a rare and elusive big cat that it’s traditionally been rather difficult to study, never mind casually sight while driving through the forest. On the afternoon of November 6, while traveling through Deramakot Forest Reserve in the Malaysian state of Sabah on the island of Borneo, photographer Michael Gordon came across a sight he was not expecting: a Sunda clouded leopard mother with her cubs.Clouded leopards are known to use logging roads to travel, as the roads are easier to traverse than dense tropical forest underbrush. Still, the sighting was so unexpected that Gordon wasn’t at first sure what he was seeing.“When I first saw the clouded leopards from a distance I thought it was just some macaques on the road,” he told Mongabay. “Once I realized that it was actually three clouded leopards I stopped the car right away. I had my camera close by, but with only a 15mm macro lens attached. I wasn’t sure whether to just enjoy the moment or go into the boot of the car and change lenses. I figured I would regret it badly if I didn’t record it.”Once he’d changed the lens, Gordon set the camera down on the front of his car and placed the lens between his feet to try and give the camera some stability. “The mother looked straight at me for a while, and once she must have deemed me safe, the cubs followed her across the road,” he said.You can watch the resulting footage here:The Sunda clouded leopard, found only on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra, is such a rare and elusive big cat that it’s traditionally been rather difficult to study, never mind casually sight while driving through the forest.It was only in 2006 that DNA analysis was at last able to establish the Sunda clouded leopard as its own species, Neofelis diardi, distinct from its mainland cousin, Neofelis nebulosa. (Though the two species look and behave remarkably similar, they actually diverged from their common ancestor over a million years ago and are not any more genetically similar to each other than they are to any of the other big cat species.)The advent of modern conservation technologies like camera traps have helped scientists to gain a better understanding of Sunda clouded leopard populations and behaviors, but even still, some researchers who focus on the species have never seen one of the cats in the wild, or only rarely encountered them.Which makes it all the more remarkable that Gordon was able to capture the footage of a mother clouded leopard with her cubs. “I have never seen a mother with cubs before and only once had a glimpse of a clouded leopard in the daylight,” Gordon told Mongabay. “This was definitely a rare sighting.”The Sunda clouded leopard is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species based on a 2015 assessment that found that ongoing threats such as forest loss, habitat degradation, and poaching have likely led to a population decline of 30 percent or more over the past two decades. It is believed that the total Sunda clouded leopard population is currently less than 10,000 individuals.While scientists have determined that the species exists at relatively low population densities in the forests of Borneo and Sumatra, the Sunda clouded leopard is a fairly adaptable creature, “found in a range of forest types, elevations and levels of disturbance,” the IUCN reports. However, despite its ability to adjust to different habitats, the Sunda clouded leopard is dependent on forests, and does not seem capable of thriving on oil palm plantations. That presents quite a threat to the species’ survival — it’s been estimated that there are only about 700 Sunda clouded leopards left in the wild in Sabah, for instance, mostly due to the conversion of their habitat to oil palm monocultures.“The forests of Borneo and Sumatra are undergoing some of the world’s highest deforestation rates, largely as the result of the expansion of oil palm plantations, and thus such development and consequent loss of habitat, coupled with the species’ apparent low population size, probably constitute the greatest threat to this species,” according to the IUCN’s assessment.In addition to habitat destruction, hunting is a serious threat to the big cats. Surveys released by WWF and TRAFFIC earlier this month found that clouded leopards are among the top 10 species targeted for the illegal wildlife trade in Southeast Asia’s Golden Triangle region.But a sighting of clouded leopards in a selectively logged forest like Deramakot may not be as unusual as it would seem. Recent research found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, mammal populations in Malaysian Borneo’s logged tropical forests are actually higher than in old-growth forests where hunting is a concern. “What was more surprising was that this pattern was so widespread across the mammal species we looked at, including some of those that partly make their living in the treetops, like orangutans and clouded leopards,” Oliver Wearn of the Zoological Society of London, who led the research, told Mongabay in August.Michael Gordon has lived in Sabah for five years now, and has been working to promote ecotourism in the Dermakot Forest Reserve, an FSC-certified forest landscape. “In a sustainably logged forest like Deramakot there does seem to be higher mammal density than primary forests, and, from a tourism perspective, with the well-maintained roads, it’s actually easier to go out and find them,” he said. “With the Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak both pledging to make all logging FSC certified and sustainable, it should ensure some of Borneo’s iconic species do have a future without just being confined to national parks.”Of course, not everyone is as thrilled by a clouded leopard sighting as Gordon was. Take, for instance, the gibbons and monkeys who were caught on camera earlier this year teaming up to “predator mob” a Sunda clouded leopard they discovered in their midst.A mother Sunda clouded leopard and one of her cubs can be seen in this still from footage shot by Michael Gordon.CITATION: Wearn, O. R., Rowcliffe, J. M., Carbone, C., Pfeifer, M., Bernard, H., & Ewers, R. M. (2017). Mammalian species abundance across a gradient of tropical land-use intensity: A hierarchical multi-species modelling approach. Biological Conservation, 212, 162-171. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Extreme seasonal changes in Amazon river levels threaten forest conservation by indigenous people

first_imgAnimals, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Conservation, Dolphins, Fish, Fishing, Flooding, Impact Of Climate Change, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Mammals, Rivers, UCSC, Wildlife The Amazon has experienced intense floods and droughts for the past 10 years, a likely effect of climate change.Surveys taken of animals between 2009 and 2015 showed terrestrial mammal populations dropped by 95 percent during intense floods, whereas aquatic animals suffered dramatic declines during an extreme drought.Scientists fear these seasonal extremes will drive the Cocama people of Peru out of the forest, depriving it of its primary conservationists. Rivers in the Amazon are cycling between increasingly severe states of flood and drought, as predicted by climate change models, and the results are directly impacting local wildlife and the indigenous people who protect the forest, a new study shows.The study, published online recently in the journal Conservation Biology, looked at seven years of population data on mammals, birds, fish and reptiles from the river bottom to the forest canopy in the Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve of Peru, and examined which groups thrived and which suffered from ever more extreme wet and dry seasons. For many, it didn’t look good.“We watched the animal populations in the yearly analysis, and we were seeing them crash in front of our eyes!” said lead author Richard Bodmer, a conservation biologist from the University of Kent in the U.K. But the crashes seemed to follow a cyclic pattern.1. Populations of red-bellied piranhas (Pygocentrus nattereri) dramatically decreased in the Peruvian Amazon during the 2010 drought. Photo from Pixabay.1. Map showing the location of the Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve in Peru (background) and a view of the Samiria River (foreground). Map from Google Maps; photo by Mark Goble, Flickr.Populations of aquatic animals like red-bellied piranhas (Pygocentrus nattereri) and pink river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis), for example, dried up during the Amazon’s record-breaking drought in 2010 to just half of the population densities that scientists saw the year before. But in the five subsequent years between 2011 and 2015, when extreme floods raised water levels to twice their usual heights, those river populations bounced back.On the other hand, land-based mammal populations, whose numbers had stayed steady during the drought, sank by 95 percent during the five years of intense flooding. Mammals such as black agoutis (Dasyprocta fuliginosa) and white-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari) drowned in the historically high floods of 2012 and 2015, Bodmer said.These opposing population ebbs and flows could disrupt the entire rainforest ecosystem, “leading to the extinction of key plant and animal species,” Whaldener Endo, a conservation biologist with the National Research Centre for Carnivore Conservation in Brazil, said in an email. Endo was not part of the study.1. A home and crop field of indigenous river dwellers submerged by extreme floods in 2009 in the Juruá region of Brazil. Many people left their forest homes for urban areas. Photo courtesy of Whaldener Endo.For Bodmer, who trains and works with the indigenous Cocama people to establish community-based conservation programs, though, the consequences could be more immediate.If years of intense, uninterrupted flooding are followed by years of extreme drought, the study warned, no animal populations will recover — the numbers will just remain low. And that’s bad news for the indigenous people who depend on them.“The people look at the forests as a grocery shop,” Bodmer said. “They are conserving those intact forests because that’s their livelihood.”1. A group of Cocama children in the Pacaya-Samiria region of Peru. People like the Cocama make up an essential part of conservation efforts in the Amazon. Photo courtesy of Richard Bodmer and FundAmazonia.The indigenous communities are used to the seasonal cycles, so they alter their food sources according to when they’re easiest to catch: land-based bushmeat in the wet season, fish in the dry season. But if all their animal resources collapsed following persistent periods of intensifying flood and drought, it would leave them with little to sustain themselves.That’s a real problem, Endo concurred. In the Juruá region of Brazil where he works, people along the river farm for a living. When the floods rose to record levels, he said, fields were submerged, homes were flooded, and some residents left the forests for the cities. “They don’t have other options to move their communities to more suitable areas in the forest,” Endo said, since they already live at the highest elevations along the river.“That’s where the danger lies in this type of seasonal intensification,” Bodmer said. If the indigenous people can’t find the motives for conservation because there are fewer animals available for them to use, then “they might just give it up. And if they give it up, the Amazon won’t be conserved because they’re the ones who are doing it right now.”As he talked, Bodmer watched from his covered launch on the Samiria River as rare pink river dolphins leaped from the water.“We don’t know what this next year’s going to bring,” he said. “But the river is already quite high for this time of year in November.”2. A pink river dolphin (Inia geoffrensis) leaps from the Samiria River in northeastern Peru. These dolphins, along with scores of fish and crocodilians, suffered from an intense drought in 2010, but most recovered during extreme floods between 2011 and 2015. Photo courtesy of Richard Bodmer and FundAmazonia.Citation Jeremy Rehm (@jrehm_sci) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories by UCSC students can be found here. Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Bodmer, Richard et al. (2017). Major Shifts in Amazon Wildlife Populations from Recent Climatic Intensification. Conservation Biology. https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12993.last_img read more

‘I’m ready’: Folayang going all out in bid for ONE title

first_imgBREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Eduard Folayang of Team Lakay shows his fighting stance as he gears up for a title match against defending champion Shinya Aoki on November 11 for the One Championship lightweight title at the Singapore Indoor Stadium. INQUIRER PHOTO BY EV ESPIRITU/@eespirituINQLA TRINIDAD – Eduard Folayang’s time has come and he is taking full advantage of it.Two weeks away from his biggest bout in ONE Championship, the 32-year-old’s confidence is at an all-time high as he prepares for war against Shinya Aoki.ADVERTISEMENT Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Sablan calls out players after UST’s 43-point loss: What do you expect? Known as a striker, Folayang has been putting on the work to improve on his ground defense to counter Aoki’s strength.“Yung mga tumalo sa kanya, iniwasan ang ground nya. Kung alam natin na yun ang specialty nila, kailangan nating dalhin sila sa area na mas lamang tayo.”The opportunity also gives Team Lakay a chance to welcome home another champion, something the group has not seen since Honorio Banario’s reign as the ONE Featherweight Champion back in 2013.“Bilang manlalaro, gusto natin maging champion,” said Folayang. “Minsan kailangang dumaan tayo sa butas ng karayom para makuha yung mga ganoong bagay, pero sa akin, naniniwala ako na may time at season para sa lahat. Hindi ko na palalagpasin yung chance para makuha yung belt.”ADVERTISEMENT EDITORS’ PICK Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND We are young Team ‘Trabaho’ scores championship title at the last leg of Smart Siklab Saya Manila Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PHcenter_img “Handa na ako,” he said after training with the rest of Team Lakay in the squad’s gym here on Tuesday. “Excited na talaga ako kasi for how many years na hinintay ko ito, ngayon magkakaroon na ako ng chance para sa title.”Folayang (16-5) will be challenging the experienced Aoki (39-6-0, 1 NC) for the ONE Lightweight title at ONE Championship: Defending Honor on November 11 at Singapore Indoor Stadium.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentEven Team Lakay founder and coach Mark Sangiao thinks that his ward is ready and primed for the spotlight.“Time na rin para ibigay nila kay Eduard yung title shot. Magandang timing ito para sa kanya,” he said. 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas View comments Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway MOST READ BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908last_img read more

Streaking La Salle blanks winless UE in UAAP women’s volleyball

first_imgView comments LATEST STORIES Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties Anthony’s jumper lifts Knicks over 76ers 2 ‘bookies’ bet collectors held in Quezon Mary Anne Fernandez had nine points to lead UE.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next China counts sharp rise in coronavirus cases, 2 in Beijing Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Beggar dead in Quezon hit-and-run incidentcenter_img Lady Spikers head coach Ramil De Jesus said his team has a newfound mean streak during their unbeaten run as they have not dropped a set for the past three games.“They want to win more than ever, because it would be really difficult to come back if you give your opponent any ounce of confidence,” said De Jesus, whose team’s last loss was against league-leader University of the Philippines.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC return“It’s difficult to matchup against a confident opponent.”Kim Dy, who has been La Salle’s leading scorer this tournament, led her squad once again with 12 points while Tin Tiamzon had 11. Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member Palace: Crisis over ABS-CBN franchise unlikely FILE – DLSU Lady Spikers against UP Lady Maroons. Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netDefending champion De La Salle stretched its winning streak to three games after disposing of woeful University of the East, 25-18, 25-14, 25-16, in the UAAP Season79 women’s volleyball tournament, Sunday at Filoil Flying V Centre.The Lady Spikers upped their mark to 5-1 while also extending the Lady Warriors’ losing streak to six for a 0-6 slate.ADVERTISEMENT Taal Volcano continues to emit steam, ash from weak explosions MOST READ Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcoslast_img read more

Investing in early childhood development

first_imgAccording to findings from a published “The Lancet’s Series, Advancing Early Childhood Development: from Science to Scale”, an estimated 43 per cent – 249 million – of children under five in low- and middle-income countries are at an elevated risk of poor development due to extreme poverty and stunting.The Caribbean regional launch of the series took place immediately following the 32nd Meeting of the Council for Human and Social Development (COHSOD) on Education, and was hosted by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in collaboration with the Caribbean Community (Caricom) Secretariat.The Series has once again made a strong case for Governments and other stakeholders to work towards designing and implementing effective policies and programmes and allocating the necessary resources to ensure early childhood development.According to the authors of the Series, early childhood development interventions that promote nurturing care – health, nutrition, responsive caregiving, security and safety, and early learning – may cost very little, when combined with existing services such as health.Sylvie Fouet, Representative of UNICEF-Guyana and Suriname, was quoted by Caricom as saying: “The science and economics are clearly on the side of investing in the first 1000 days of a child’s life. The cost of not doing so is higher. Children fall behind long before they set foot in school.”There is, therefore, need for increased global commitment to early childhood development. The consequences of inaction impact not only present but future generations. In the Region, there is less public provisioning for early childhood education, especially for the 0-2 year age group, as opposed to the preschool years. For example, it was explained that the uneven funding distribution across sectors is striking; expenditure on pre-primary as a share of government expenditure on education is only 2.9 per cent compared to primary at 34.9 per cent and 40.3 per cent for secondary education.One of the authors of the Lancet Series, Rafael Pérez-Escamilla, Professor of Epidemiology & Public Health, Director of the Office of Public Health Practice, and Director of the Global Health Concentration at the Yale School of Public Health, presented the research findings and recommendations to Ministers of Education from several Caricom Member States, as well as regional education officials at the COHSOD Meeting.The Series authors propose several ways the global community can scale up support for early childhood development services; these include by: encouraging the adoption and implementation of policies to create supportive environments for families to provide nurturing care for young children; building capacity and strengthening coordination to promote early childhood development through existing health, nutrition, education, social, and child protection services; strengthening measurement and ensuring accountability for early childhood development services; increasing research; fostering global and regional leadership and action and expanding political will and funding through advocacy for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).Guyana must be commended for placing the issue of early childhood development high on its national development agenda. The Government, through a US$1.7 million grant from the World Bank, launched its Early Childhood Development Project. The Project, which came as a result of intense discussions among early childhood educators and other relevant officials, is aimed at improving the emergent literacy and numeracy outcomes for children at the nursery level and primary Grade One in hinterland regions.The first component of the Project caters for capacity building for nursery and Grade One teachers and is aimed at improving the quality of instruction and learning at the nursery and Grade One levels by strengthening teachers’ knowledge, particularly with regard to the implementation of new strategies for the development of emergent literacy and numeracy skills, through an in-service teacher training programme. The second component of the Project targets improved supply of teaching and learning materials.The issue of early childhood development must be taken seriously by all stakeholders as research has shown that a child’s brain develops faster in the first two to three years than at any other time in life. It was proven that these early years are also a critical period of adaptability and responsiveness to interventions.last_img read more