Seraphs seem to be heading in right direction

first_img BY DOUG McKENZIEStaff Writer CHRIS KELLY staff Mater Dei is looking to John Supon once again to lead the Seraphs this season, as they look to build on the momentum they gained at the end of last year. Momentum can mean everything in high school football. Once a team gets rolling, good things tend to happen, one after another. But just how long momentum lasts depends upon the team. This year’s Mater Dei football team is hoping that their momentum survived the offseason. The Seraphs lost their first eight games of the year last year, before winning their final two, 27-17 over Keansburg and 35-0 over Immaculate Conception in a consolation state playoff game. In those two games, head coach John Corneliusen’s team gave their finest efforts of the year, and began to show the type of improvement Corneliusen was looking for throughout the season. As they entered this season, Mater Dei was hoping to continue that trend, with a host of players returning for what they hope will be a program-boosting campaign. Leading the way is senior quarterback John Supon, who is starting for the third-straight year, while seniors Michael Heyer and Anthony Meli start in the backfield, with junior Alex Horan in the mix as well. Other threats for the Seraphs are senior Jay Cash at the split end, senior Pat Barthole as the flanker, and juniors Chris Theobald and Justin Vega at the tight end position. One of the strengths of this year’s team should be its offensive line, where seniors Ryan Lino and Brian Von Bargen are the guards, senior Sean Conway is the center, and senior Andrew Kelleher and junior Will Grenger are the tackles. Their overall experience should pay dividends as the Seraphs face some of the smaller defenses on their schedule. On defense, many of the same players will be featured, with Line and Von Barger joining senior Alan Schuluwitz, Theobald and Grenger on the defensive line, with Cash, Conway and Vega manning the linebacking spots. The secondary includes Meli and junior Anthony Albanese at the corners, with Supon and Heyer at the safety position. This is an experienced Mater Dei team that has certainly taken its lumps over the last few years. This year, they look continue the progress they showed at the end of the 2005 campaign. On Saturday, they opened up with a good Point Beach team, and played well early on. However, Point Beach opened up its air attack late in the second quarter to take a 14-0 lead at the half, than added a field goal to start the third. Mater Dei’s offense managed to get a touchdown on a Supon 4-yard pass to Cash late in the third quarter, but the Garnet Gulls were able to hold the Seraphs off from there. This Friday night, the Seraphs will make the trip down to Point Pleasant to take on a defending state champion Point Boro team that is fully expecting to make another championship run after last year’s 12-0 campaign. This is certainly a tough draw for a Mater Dei looking to progress, but it also represents an opportunity to show everyone just how far they’ve already come. Game time is 7 p.m. BY DOUG McKENZIE Staff Writer last_img read more

The resistance of Peruvian coffee

first_imgArticle published by Romina Castagnino Yellow rust and other diseases attack the crops of what is considered some of the best coffee in the world.Farmers in the southern Peru’s Sandia Valley are now beginning to realize that coca leaf is more profitable than customary coffee and citrus.About 500 hectares (1235 acres) have been deforested and destined for coca production in Bahuaja-Sonene National Park.There are 4,468 hectares (11,000 acres) of coca plantations in Puno, with an annual growth of 10 percent, according to the 2015 Peru Coca Survey submitted in July 2016. PUNO, Peru – In November 2016, a bus traveling to the district of Putina Punco in southern Peru, deep in the forest and hours from the nearest city, was attacked by thugs with ski masks and long-range weapons. They stole cell phones and all the money that the passengers were going to spend in the traditional Sunday market. There were no deaths or injuries, but the attack left residents of the valley (who are unaccustomed to the sound of gunfire) alarmed.Typically, this part of the country is known for selling citrus and producing some of the best coffee in the world. But things are changing in the southern Peruvian Amazon.***Seventy-year-old coffee grower Teodoro Calle is just over 5 feet tall and his arms and legs look like they are made of solid rock. He goes up and down the mountains like a 20-year-old boy. He pulls a nearly 90-pound coffee trolley through mud and stones with the same ease as a lady pushing a cart at the supermarket. He has lived in the Sandia Valley since he was 13 years old. He finished school when he was 30 and received his law degree when he was 70. He is an example of perseverance.Calle remembers when they founded the Coffee Cooperative San Juan del Oro and then created the Central Agricultural Cooperative of the Valleys of Sandia (CECOVASA) back in the 1960s, to collect and commercialize their coffee without intermediaries. He never imagined that, in the last two decades, they would be able to sell almost 95 percent of their annual production to England, the United States, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Spain. Nor did he imagine that they would win awards from organizations such as the Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) or the Rainforest Alliance.Their work has helped their coffee beans earn the reputation of the best in Peru for the last seven years.Teodoro Calle, coffee grower of the district of Putina Punco in Puno. Photo by Daniel Silva/WCS PeruHowever, the years in which Calle produced up to 20,000 kg of coffee annually are long gone. Now he is being optimistic to hope for even 2,000 kg. But he is up against more than one formidable opponent, including Mother Nature.“I cling to the coffee, but the yellow rust has killed our crops and there are fewer people working on the land,” said Calle. “It is no longer profitable. They are instead switching to coca.” Yellow rust is a fungus that attacks and sometimes kills coffee leaves. When there is an outbreak, this deadly disease can seriously affect Peruvian production destroying coffee plantations and damaging the economy of families who depend on coffee for a living.According to CECOVASA figures, in the area of Tunkimayo — a couple of hours from Teodoro’s house — in the last five years alone the number of active coffee farmers has decreased drastically, from 60 to only six. “Nobody can live only from coffee these days.Panoramic view of Putina Punco district in Puno. Photo by Daniel Silva/WCS PeruAccording to the latest 2015 Peru Coca Survey submitted in July 2016 by the National Commission for Development and Life without Drugs (DEVIDA) and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), there are 4,468 hectares (11,000 acres) of coca plantations exclusively in Puno, with an annual growth of 10 percent. According to the National Service of Natural Areas Protected (Sernanp), 358 of those hectares are situated within Bahuaja-Sonene National Park, although other organizations, such as USAID, say it is closer to 500 hectares.Putina Punco is an Andean community perched in the Amazon, complete with picturesque adobe houses and rooftops made of Andean tile. The majority of inhabitants came from the Peruvian cities of Puno and Juliaca or from Bolivia, and they imported their traditions as well.“In the last years, it has grown a lot. Everything that did not grow in decades did it in the last five or ten years. Even nightclubs are there,” said Patricio Mamani, who seeks to create his brand of coffee: Bird-friendly Café, to encourage his neighbors to look for more alternatives closer to coffee, nature, and farther away from coca.Yellow rust and other diseases attack the crops from what is considered the best coffee in the world. Photo courtesy of WCS PeruNatural richnessThe Sandia Valley, in the Amazon of Puno, is made up of two important basins belonging to the Tambopata River and the Inambari River. The Bahuaja Sonene National Park in southern Peru connects the Peruvian protected natural areas with those of Bolivia, and borders the Madidi National Park (Bolivia) and the Tambopata National Reserve (Peru).This protected area has rich biodiversity: it is home to more than 173 species of mammals (34 percent of Peru) and 680 species of birds (37 percent of Peru) have been registered. It was created in 1996 and its nearly 1.1 million hectares is home to varied habitats, which are located between 200 and 2,450 meters above sea level.“I can say that almost 99 percent of the park’s territory (Bahuaja Sonene) is in a good state of conservation,” said David Aranibar, head of the Bahuaja Sonene National Park. “The indigenous community of Kotsimba encouraged mining activity inside the park, but after much discussion with them, they withdrew their machinery and did not move further into the park.”Aranibar said that he is more worried about the advancement of coca leaf plantations inside the park and its buffer zone. In the latter, more than 2,500 hectares of coca crops have already been identified.Coca leaf crops replace coffee crops in the Sandia Valley in Puno. Photo by Musuk Nolte/WCS PeruAccording to a DEVIDA and UNODC report, seizures of chemical inputs and cocaine paste in Inambari (Masiapo, Pampa Yanamayo, Isilluma) and Tambopata (Sandia, San Juan del Oro, Putina Punco) have increased since 2004. The report also confirms that the drugs are transported outside the country via Puno and Juliaca, which link directly to Bolivia.In only two interventions in the Sandia Valley, in April and August of 2016, the Peruvian national police seized 3,800 gallons of fuel and more than 20 tons of lime that were destined for cocaine production.Pedro Yaranga, drug trafficking specialist, confirmed the possibility that this activity will continue to expand in this part of the Amazon.“The government must warn about drug trafficking in Sandia,” Yaranga said. “This is a serious threat to Puno because it borders Bolivia where the Sinaloa cartel operates.” The Sinaloa drug-trafficking cartel is the most powerful in the world and Yaranga confirms that it controls activity in the so-called “White Triangle” of Latin America, comprised of Colombia, Peru and Bolivia.In 2015, the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP) registered a clandestine runway inside the Bahuaja Sonene Park.“When they install the runways you can draw several conclusions. I think the most important conclusion is that not only are they flying cocaine paste, but also cocaine hydrochloride,” Aranibar said. “There are no flights just for cocaine paste. That indicates that there are laboratories that are processing it. We are entering another level of drug trafficking, and it worries me that the activity will continue growing. It is time to act and stop it before it is uncontainable.”He also confirmed that there are new cocaleros — coca leaf growers— in the area “everyone who escapes from the VRAEM (valley of the rivers Apurímac, Ene and Mantaro) are settling here instead, where there is vague state control due to its location and poor communication.”Changes in the Sandia Valley are noted every year.In 2014, farmers barely produced 570,000 kg among all the coffee farmers of Sandia. Before 2011, the average production was not lower than 10,000,000 kg. Photo by Musuk Nolte/WCS PeruOn a recent trip to Putina Punco district, 4×4 pickup trucks, which were scarce a few years ago, have now taken over the streets. Bars and night clubs are proliferating, as well as prostitution and alcoholism.Patricio Mamani, a coffee farmer in the Sandia Valley and former president of CECOVASA described the changes as night and day.“There were no cars before. The town was small,” Mamani said. “Everything was very quiet and everyone helped you. You could see everyone carrying their coffee beans, happy. Everything has changed. Not only the weather but also the people. Nobody wants to work with coffee crops anymore; there is no labor, everyone works at the coca fields where they gain up to five times more than they did with coffee crops.”Mamani promoted the fair trade certification that coffee producers in this part of Peru have had for the past couple of decades. For him there is still joy in coffee farming.“I come out of my farm, and I listen to the birds sing,” he said. “Coffee makes me happy.”In 2014 park rangers detected the construction of a landing field inside the park by the rural community of Colorado that illegally invaded the protected territory.“We received death threats,” said Aranibar, head of the Bahuaja Sonene National Park. “We were sent letters saying that they would not be held responsible for the mishaps the rangers who entered their territory could have. That is why we decided to remove the rangers by the end of 2015 and only carry out monitoring activities in the area.” In May 2016, the Regional Government of Puno declared the invalidity of the Colorado rural community and the park rangers returned to their checkpoints.AlternativesWhile the assault was taking place in Putina Punco, Javier Cahuapaza Mamani, CECOVASA’s general manager, was on a flight back to Peru from Seoul, South Korea. He had spent the weekend with a CECOVASA committee showcasing the benefits of his world-renowned coffee at the prestigious Café Show in Korea, which brings together the world’s main coffee producers and companies. He could not imagine what was happening back home where his colleagues are struggling to continue producing coffee.“Everything we produce, we sell. Nothing stays with us. The problem in recent years has been diseases such as rust, and other insects that are affecting crops. And well, coca leaf is also a factor that affects the production of coffee,” Javier said.One of the worst years in decades was 2014, when barely 570,000 kg was produced among all the coffee farmers of Sandia. Before 2011, the average production was never lower than 10,000,000 kg. The sharp downturn pushed coffee growers to shift toward other activities.“The idea is that they can complement their coffee with other crops that are not coca leaves, or with ecotourism,” Aranibar said. “We are working together with other organizations, such as the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), the municipality of Putina Punco, CECOVASA, Putina Punco Agroforestry Project, to improve coffee crops and also give people more alternatives.The coffee Tunki of Puno is highly valued on the international market. Photo courtesy of WCS PeruOn the other hand, the WCS in Lima, an international organization that works to support the conservation of the Greater Madidi-Tambopata landscape, which Peru and Bolivia share, works on a project that seeks to promote the potential of the area.“The efforts we carry out are mainly aimed at encouraging sustainable activities that ensure the maintenance of forest cover in the buffer zone and the area of influence of the Bahuaja Sonene National Park,” said Loyola Escamilo, director of the Peruvian Madidi-Tambopata Landscape WCS project in Peru. “This is the case with coffee. WCS works to strengthen coffee cooperatives in the area and to position the coffee farmer as a key player in the dynamization of the local economy.”Escamilo notes that the coffee is unparalleled in quality.“This special high-quality coffee is grown by about 8,000 Quechua and Aymara families, and to date, they have made it one of the best in the world,” he said. “As a country we must also promote the development and improvement of conditions in health, education, environmental and forest management in this area with rich biodiversity and high-quality coffee while supporting coffee farming against rust and other diseases.”DEVIDA is working with Sandia Valley residents to solve this problem. In 2015, they planted 200 new hectares of cocoa, as well as 100 of yellow maize and another 100 of beans, offering more alternatives to illegal coca leaf cultivation. They also distributed more than 2 million forest seedlings to help reforest these areas. They are also giving farmers land titles; they have organized workshops, fairs, contests, outdoor film screenings and various ways to promote drug-free forests and achieve a better quality of life for the people living in this corner of Peru.Other organizations such as the Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation (MINAGRI), the United Nations Development Program, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the National Coffee Board, and the Peruvian Chamber of Coffee and Cocoa, are also working in the surroundings of the National Park Bahuaja Sonene strengthening the capacities of the coffee producers and also trying to get rid of the yellow rust and other diseases that have greatly reduced the crops.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and was first published in Spanish on our Latam site on November 29, 2016.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Rainforest, Biodiversity, coca plantations, Coffee, Deforestation, Environment, Farming center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Kenyan farmers reap economic, environmental gains from ABCDs of agroforestry

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Agroforestry, Archive, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Community Development, Conservation Solutions, Drought, Economics, Global Warming Mitigation, Indigenous Peoples, Soil Carbon, Sustainable Development In Kenya’s Rift Valley, rural communities are implementing agroforestry to respond to new challenges brought by climate change.The Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) program trains farmers in agroforestry techniques that increase their resilience and food security in the face of hotter, drier growing conditions.ABCD improves the economic prospects of those who implement it through diverse, year-long harvests and new markets for edible produce and wood products.Agroforestry is also a main facet of Kenya’s goal to reduce carbon emissions under the Paris Climate Treaty, since it sequesters a large amount of carbon in woody plants both above and below ground. KERICHO, Kenya – Less than a decade ago, the hills of Tuiyobei village in Kenya’s Rift Valley were nearly bare, with few trees or shrubs beyond the coffee plantations that yielded very little. The rain was sporadic, temperatures were rising, and crop yields and livelihoods were deteriorating. High deforestation triggered by increasing demand for firewood, lumber and charcoal had degraded the ecosystem.These factors, plus high erosion rates after rains and chaotic winds, prompted Maureen Salim and five others to form the Toben Gaa self-help group to improve their standard of living through environmental conservation.Some in this community are descended from the Ogiek people, a group indigenous to the Mau Forest. But they no longer practice the traditional ways of their forefathers, like gathering honey, and instead farm the land, like their neighbors. To improve their food security and nutrition, Salim says the group has embraced trees.“We came up with a community action plan to plant 50 trees a year per household as access to energy, wind [protection] for the coffee, and improving the village vegetation cover by 10 percent,” the 32-year-old mother of five and Toben Gaa self-help group secretary told Mongabay.Terminalia brownii trees planted in an ABCD agroforestry system. Photo by Sophie Mbugua for MongabayThe action plan came as a result of training in the Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) approach by the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). The group has now grown to 46 members, 22 of them women. ABCD aims to empower communities to develop themselves through the assets they already have access to, along with some minimal support such as the sharing of skills and knowledge.Today, trees species such as acacias, Casuarina, silky oak (Grevillea robusta), Nile tulip (Markhamia lutea), moringa (Moringa oleifera), agati (Sesbania grandiflora), neem (Azadirachta Indica), Tasmanian blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) and mwalambe (Terminalia brownii) are intercropped with coffee, fruit trees such as guavas and tree tomatoes, and crops such as maize, beans, watermelons, papayas and pumpkins. Depending on an individual farmer’s interests, animal fodder such as Calliandra plus Boma Rhodes and Napier grasses are also intercropped. Others invest in woodlots for lumber and charcoal. Silky oak is widely planted along farm boundaries, with mwalambe grown in higher areas susceptible to soil erosion.The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) states that by 2050, food production will have to increase by over 60 percent to meet the increasing global demand for food, as the world’s population swells to 9.3 billion people. The FAO recognizes agroforestry — farming using trees — as one of the means to help meet the rising demands for food and fuel.Trees also store carbon dioxide and improve microclimates through the capture of moisture, and improve soil fertility as leaves fall and decompose, while providing habitats for creatures such as birds, insects and fungi, as well as providing shade and shelter from wind for animals, plants and humans.Learning their ABCDs“The first thing they are taught to do is to assess the assets they have at home and in the village,” Victoria Apondi, a field agent with ICRAF, said of the ABCD participants. “They physically draw them on a piece of paper, then walk around the village to identify and verify their location.”Maureen Salim shows off a pumpkin grown amongst her trees. Photo by Sophie Mbugua for MongabaySalim says the group identified and mapped the land, rivers, institutions, extension service providers, retired agricultural officers, lead farmers and markets. “It helped me and my husband recognize our farming interests and the value we had in our two-and-a-half-acre [1 hectare] land that we never utilized fully throughout the year,” Salim said.Salim, who previously farmed coffee and maize, often let her land idle after harvesting the maize. “Traditionally, we slashed and burned after harvest. For those rearing a large number of cattle, they were left to graze freely on the farm awaiting long rains during April to plant again,” she said.Today, Salim and her husband, Moses, practice mixed farming, where they grow silky oak and acacia trees for shade, firewood and lumber. Under these, they grow coffee, with Napier and Boma Rhodes grasses for livestock fodder, plus bananas, traditional vegetables, sweet potatoes and fruit trees such as tree tomatoes and guavas.ICRAF also introduced them to ABCD’s “leaky bucket” concept that community members now use to record their cash inflows and outflows, at both the household and community levels. “The inflows are the earnings such as proceeds from the farm, cow milk sales and shop proceeds, with the costs like the daily household needs, school fees, farm expenses such as pesticides, weeding fees and farm workers marked as the outflows,” Apondi says.At the end of a season, Apondi says, participants like Salim are required to balance production costs versus final earnings to help understand losses or profits during the season. “ABCD taught us through leaky buckets how to increase our cash inflows through growing short-, medium- and long-term crops. We can sell vegetables within three months, some fruits within six, or continuously, and coffee annually,” Salim says.In addition, ABCD uses community-led value-chain analysis that describes activities and people involved in agricultural production from farm to market. This ledger is vital in tracking expenses throughout the farming cycle and for accounting for income from sales. “It allows the farmers to plan for farm inputs as well as the selling time,” Apondi says. “Understanding the value chain also helps them identify existing markets, reducing exploitation by middlemen.”Implementation and incomeLast year, savings from the farm products enabled Salim’s family to open a basic food shop. “We used about 40,000 Kenyan shillings [$400] to open it. Monthly, we realize a profit of 9,000 shillings … I no longer buy fruits, milk or firewood,” Salim says.Casuarina trees’ flowers provide forage for honey-making bees in ABCD agroforestry systems. Photo by Sophie Mbugua for MongabayWith the cows, Salim practices “zero grazing” — keeping them in an enclosure and feeding them Calliandra plus Napier and Boma Rhodes grass that she grows on the farm. She sells 4 liters (about 1 gallon) of milk a day at 60 shillings (60 cents) per liter, and still has about 2 liters left over for her family.Salim is not the only one maximizing cultivation throughout the year. Benson Orungo, a 46-year-old father of eight from neighboring Ochoria village, also turned to agroforestry, inspired by the Toben Gaa self-help group.He, too, planted silky oak and Nile tulip, as well as medicinal plants such as moringa, agati and neem, along with maize, beans and watermelons on his 4-hectare (10-acre) farm. Orungo also practiced beekeeping, for which he grew Calliandra, whose flower provides the nectar for the bees.“It’s seven years since I started practicing ABCD; for the last three years I sell firewood, fencing and building poles to local people, churches and schools,” he told Mongabay.From sales of the poles alone, Orungo was able to put away 14,000 shillings ($135) a year with the village savings and loan association. The savings and the trees he planted for the future will be very important to his family; on Nov. 28, a month after Mongabay’s visit, Benson Orungo was killed by cattle rustlers who attacked the village.Benson Orungo mulches Grevilla intercropped with maize and beans. Photo by Sophie Mbugua for MongabayChanging traditionsThe self-help group started off with 4,000 silky oak, Tasmanian blue gum, Casuarina, Calliandra and Nile tulip tree seedlings. Each member received 50 seedlings, and the rest were distributed to churches and schools. Their tree nursery produces about 8,000 seedlings annually, which they sell during the rainy season in April and May.Changing long-held farming practices was not an easy task. “Initially, having people plant 50 trees was a task, as they complained about the size. But once we learned that we could intercrop them with other crops, it becomes easier to embrace,” Orungo said.That wasn’t the only challenge; the villagers found they were putting in more hours on the farm under the ABCD approach, Orungo said. “It was difficult at the beginning; we were used to one season of planting that did not require too much work. But now, ABCD introduced a model of farming where one is busy at the farm throughout the year. It seemed too much at the beginning, [but] realizing the profits has motivated many to do more.”While some needed a push, other members, like John Omuso, saw an opportunity from the high interest among schools, churches and neighbors joining groups to plant trees. Trained in nursery management, he decided to harvest tree seeds and grow them in a nursery. From his first trial this year, Omuso sold about 10,000 seedlings to the local church, farmers and the school during the April-May rains.“I managed to raise school fees for my daughter who was scheduled to join the university, without assistance from the village. Now a school wants 100 seedlings I will sell at 80 shillings each for non-grafted and 150 shillings each for the grafted. It is my new project,” Omuso said.Francis Obiero, a 40-year-old father of six, has a 4-hectare farm located in a hilly area, which would normally produce nine bags of maize at harvest. “Each time it rained, the topsoil would be carried away [to] the swamp that forms part of my land,” he says.He subdivided his land into small blocks with terraces, and planted bananas, silky oak and papaya trees along them. After harvest, he leaves the maize stover to rot along the terraces. Last year, he harvested 19 sacks weighing 90 kilograms (198 pounds) each.Beehive in an ABCD  agroforestry system. Photo by Sophie Mbugua for Mongabay“The leaves fall and decay faster, adding nutrients to the soil. It maintains moisture for a long time, and it’s never exposed to the direct sun. I also rotate maize with legumes instead of planting them together, as was the norm before,” Obiero says. He also plants mwalambe trees for charcoal production, firewood and lumber.To maximize and balance cash inflows, in 2013 Obiero dug a fishpond at the swampy edge of his farm. “Since nothing grew there, I figured a fishpond could help improve food security and diversity for nutrition at home. To minimize costs, I started using poultry drops to add nutrients to the pond and feed the fish. I buy [some] commercial feeds, and then use cow dung as fertilizer [as] the pond requires nutrients to allow plankton to grow,” Obiero says. He sells the fish for up to 150 shillings each to local hotels and households.Improved local food security, global benefitIn line with the Paris Agreement, Kenya committed to reducing its carbon dioxide emissions by 30 percent by 2030 relative to the business-as-usual scenario in its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) submission to the United Nations Convention on Climate Change. It outlines improving forest cover and promoting climate-smart agriculture, such as agroforestry, as keys to achieving this target. More than 80 percent of Kenya’s landmass is arid and semi-arid land, and economically the country depends highly on climate-sensitive sectors such as rain-fed agriculture.Lisa Fuchs, ICRAF’s project manager in charge of boosting agroforestry adoption in western Kenya, says she believes such community-based agroforestry approaches can help improve microclimates, economic opportunity and food security in rural Kenya; but a lot more needs to be done if agroforestry is to help the country meet its international commitments.For Salim, practicing ABCD has not only improved her household’s finances, but also helped her village bounce back faster as droughts intensify in many parts of the country.“Since planting trees, the winds have reduced. The areas under shade seem to recover faster after drought compared to other areas, and coffee under shade yields better results,” Salim says.Benson Orungo among his Casuarina trees. He was a community leader and played a large role ensuring adoption of the ABCD approach in his village. The son of another self-help group member also lost his life in the cattle raid. Photo by Sophie Mbugua for MongabaySophie Mbugua is an independent science journalist based in Nairobi. Follow her on Twitter at smbuguah.This feature is part of an ongoing series about agroforestry, see all the articles here.  Article published by Erik Hoffnercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Red Lions out to dominate anew

first_imgLSU title parade draws massive crowds View comments Ai-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’ Tobias Harris’ late 3 seals Sixers’ win over Knicks Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Thousands join Kalibo Ati-atihan despite typhoon devastation Missile-capable frigate BRP Jose Rizal inches closer to entering PH Navy’s fleet “We like the pressure that comes from being defending champions,” said do-it-all guard Robert Bolick, who emerged as the Lions go-to-guy when they ruled the Filoil Flying V Premier Cup recently.“We like it this way because it keeps us on our toes. I told my teammates to continue playing with an underdog mentality. If we think of ourselves as favorites [this season], we might lose our focus.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’San Beda, winner of 10 of the last 12 NCAA crowns, opens the season against host San Sebastian College.San Beda coach Boyet Fernandez is returning to the Lions’ bench after leading them to a couple of titles, the last coming in 2014. He took over Jamike Jarin, now National U coach.Jarin also replaced Fernandez three years ago when the latter accepted the NLEX coaching post in the PBA.One of Fernandez’s tough decisions during the offseason was to pick Cameroonians Arnauld Noah and Donald Tankoua, leaving out the taller yet inexperienced Eugene Toba. Trump invites Duterte again to visit US – this time for March summit Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img LaVine scores 42, Chicago rallies late to beat Cavs MOST READ Clippers, Lakers among most-watched NBA teams by Filipinos End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend LATEST STORIES All signs seem to point to another dominant campaign for San Beda College in the NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball.A preseason crown at the expense of UAAP champion La Salle close to two weeks ago and an almost intact roster have put the spotlight on the Red Lions ahead of tipoff this Saturday at Mall of Asia Arena.ADVERTISEMENT Lyceum, which hardly merited a second look since it joined the league in 2009, has been tipped as a strong contender this season along with San Sebastian, Jose Rizal U and Letran.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Huey pulls out of Malaysia SEA Gameslast_img read more

APNU/AFC’S sinister messages, “dog whistle”, overt threats to avoid elections

first_imgDear Editor,The newest element of a strategy to avoid elections totally or, at least, delay elections for as long as possible, even if laws are violated, is to issue threats in the form of a dog whistle. The obvious and sinister threats contained in the messages are clear and these threats are directed to certain people, including the new Chair of GECOM. Make no mistake, David Granger’s meeting with GECOM was a dog whistle in itself. APNU/AFC deliberately telegraphed to the media that Granger was meeting GECOM with a December date in mind for elections. That never happened, but the speculation fueled by APNU/AFC was sinisterly intended to telegraph to Claudette Singh that she should not consider any date before December.Speaking on behalf of APNU/AFC/PNC, George Norton contemptuously declared they will consider GECOM’s new Chair’s position on House-to-House (HTH) Registration in determining the way forward, thereby withdrawing the onus they placed on GECOM to determine the date for elections. Previously, with their hand-picked, illegally appointed Chair, a man placed at the head of GECOM to do the bidding of Granger and APNU/AFC, their position was whatever GECOM decides APNU/AFC and the country are bound by. Granger abdicated his presidential duty to name a date for elections to GECOM, insisting the date for elections is the mandate for GECOM. Now that a new legally appointed Chair is in place who APNU/AFC is uncertain will unreservedly follow APNU/AFC’s dictum, their posture has changed. This is the genesis of Norton’s statement, giving notice, APNU/AFC has no obligation to accept GECOM’s decision, even if that decision is based on the law and on judicial mandates. It is a dog whistle, directed to the new Chair, she has no responsibility to determine elections timeline.From their previous position, it was GECOM’s responsibility to determine when elections must be held, APNU/AFC has shifted to a position that the responsibility is entirely that of the President. Of course, both positions are wrong. It is only the responsibility of the President to name a date within a constitutionally-mandated timeframe. At as this time, that date must be on or before September 18.GECOM’s present HTH Registration, embarked on through the direction of the previously illegal Chairman, is in contravention of that constitutionally-mandated election timeline. The new Chair has responsibly indicated she is obligated to adhere to the Constitution and the law. In that case, she has no alternative but to support the legally available mechanism to have a list available for elections within the constitutional timeline, presently by September 18. That legally available option is a Claims and Objections period, even the Chief Elections Officer conceded that. With Claims and Objections, elections is possible within the constitutionally-mandated three months. HTH Registration will not permit elections by September 18, it will extend the time unreasonably way beyond this date.Every day, there is more evidence added to the already overwhelming evidence trove, APNU/AFC/PNC, from the beginning, have done everything possible to prevent the holding of elections, which, in accordance with the Constitution, should have been held since March 21, 2019. George Norton’s vulgar pronouncement on HTH Registration and Granger’s seemingly useless visit to the Commission are signals to the Chair, a dog whistle, telegraphing their intention to accept nothing other than a continuation of HTH Registration and elections sometime in the far distant future. These are clear signals to the new GECOM Chair that GECOM’s decision must be in accord with what APNU/AFC/PNC wants, not what is legal, not what the Judiciary says, not what the Constitution demands, or else.APNU/AFC/PNC is determined to violate the Constitution, avoiding an election like the black plague. Each time, their delaying tactic faces a stern rebuke and a possible wall, they resort to bullying. When the Attorney General told an audience last Monday there will be “dire consequences”, invoking the fear of mayhem on the streets of Guyana, it was a frontal threat not to dare stand in their way. It was not just a threat to the public, it was a warning to the GECOM Chair that she will be responsible for the mayhem in the streets if she adheres to anything other than what the PNC wants.The nation is being held hostage by the PNC’s DNA, the genetics of fear, dictatorship and authoritarianism. They do not believe in democracy, in peacefully giving up control of Government through free and fair elections. So far, they have bought an extra six months and it looks like they are on their way to expire another three months. How long will they defy the people, how long will they defy the courts, how long will they defy the Constitution, how long will they defy democracy? Too many people are still aiding and abetting them with their silence.Sincerely,Dr Leslie Ramsammylast_img read more

Theaters’ fingers crossed

first_imgThis year’s crop of Academy Award best picture contenders may have caught the eye of Oscar voters, but none can be considered a major box office hit – at least not yet. The Oscar attention is expected to greatly boost business for “Brokeback Mountain,” “Munich,” “Good Night, and Good Luck” and “Capote” at the multiplex, and for “Crash” on DVD shelves in the weeks leading up to the Academy Awards on March 5. “Each of these films is holding a potential winning lottery ticket,” said box office analyst Paul Dergarabedian, president of Exhibitor Relations Co. “The excitement is building between now and the Oscar telecast when they can make the most of the nomination period which is the best for box office.” Combined, the five best picture contenders have grossed $187.5 million domestically, the same amount grossed by 2002 best picture winner “Gladiator” alone. “It definitely helps,” Lee said. “These things feed off each other. The success reminds the voters to pay attention to it. And from the voting, people know it’s in the news and in ads and that will bring them to the movie theater. The award thing is free publicity, too.” “Munich” was down to less than 1,000 theaters by Oscar nomination day but Universal Pictures hopes to leverage its best picture and best director nominations (Steven Spielberg) by adding about 150 theaters Friday and more in the weeks to come. Domestic grosses were at $40.6 million as of Sunday. “Hopefully, it grows and grows,” said Nikki Rocco, Universal’s president of distribution. “With the nominations, we are getting tremendous support from exhibition. There’s still a lot of people who need to see this movie.” “Good Night, and Good Luck,” released by Warner Independent Classics, has grossed just $25.1 million domestically and is playing in only 105 theaters. The studio plans to give it its widest release ever this weekend as it expands to 925 locations, said Steven Friedlander, WIP’s head of distribution. “It opened up on 11 screens as a black-and-white history lesson,” Friedlander said Tuesday. “Now, it’s a George Clooney-directed picture with six Oscar nominations. We are hoping as many people as possible see it in the theaters. Tthat’s the best way to see it.” The film earned a best director nod for Clooney and best actor nomination for David Strathairn. “Capote,” which was nominated for five awards, has performed modestly at the box office, earning just $15.3 million to date. Sony Picture Classics was still determining Friday how many theaters “Capote” would expand to Friday. It is currently in just 325 locations. “The good news is the movie is going to be released wider,” the film’s producer Michael Ohoven said Tuesday. “We don’t have the big (prints and advertising) machine behind it. Now with this recognition, this is a way to get this movie out there and people will see it now. It really helps.” “Crash,” released earlier than any of the other best picture contenders, grossed $55.4 million during its theatrical run and had already been a strong seller and rental title on DVD. The best picture nod should give it a home video boost. While “Walk the Line” didn’t receive an expected best picture nod, it is already a big hit at the box office with a domestic gross of $106.2 million earned over three months in theaters. Its lead acting nominations for stars Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon and five nods overall could extend its life-span in theaters. Greg Hernandez, (818) 713-3758 greg.hernandez@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card “There’s still a lot of box office left in a lot of these films because none of them are even at $100 million yet,” Dergarabedian said. “Brokeback,” which received the most nominations Tuesday with eight nods, has had a slow rollout over the past eight weeks and had grossed just more than $51 million as of Sunday. Focus Features, which has carefully handled the release of its controversial film about two cowboys who fall in love, will be giving “Brokeback” its biggest run yet when it expands to more than 2,000 theaters on Friday. “We were planning for this great moment and our expectations the weekend are high even with the Super Bowl being there, which is why we are pushing up our number of theaters,” said Focus distribution head Jack Foley. “Now if we can just dig deeper into the marketplace with more commercial moviegoers than we’ve got so far, there’s still more money to be had. I’m hoping the younger group, under 25, comes out in greater volume in the coming weeks.” “Brokeback” director Ang Lee said at last weekend’s Directors Guild Awards that the prizes from critics’ groups, guilds and the Golden Globes have already resulted in more people seeing the movie and any Oscar attention should help propel it along. last_img read more

Boys honored for deeds

first_img160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PICO RIVERA – It’s not often that city officials here have two heroes to honor at the same time. That’s what happened Tuesday night, when Pico Rivera City Council members lauded youngsters Randy Morales and Osmar Cortez for their “unselfish and instinctive” actions at the scenes of two separate fires recently. Too often, residents hear only about the bad things teens do, making Randy’s and Osmar’s actions a strong example for other young people, council members said before presenting citations to the two during the council’s regular meeting. Both boys were joined by their families and a slew of school and city officials. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: John Jackson greets a Christmas that he wasn’t sure he’d seeOsmar, 12, was singled out for his actions on Dec. 4, when he ran back into his family’s burning home and rescued his 1-year-old brother, Matthew Alvarado, who was sleeping inside. Osmar suffered minor smoke inhalation and was treated at the scene. No one else was injured in the blaze, officials said. On Nov. 21, 13-year-old Randy raced on his bike to the Los Angeles County Fire Department station on Slauson Avenue to notify firefighters about a fire at the nearby Pico Rivera Plating factory. His quick response helped limit the size and damage of the fire, Robert Frackleton, the company’s vice president said. – Araceli Esparza last_img read more

Liverpool outclass Arsenal, Palace stun United, Chelsea secure first win

first_imgSaturday is GameDay on talkSPORT and we review another thrilling day of Premier League action… BIG PRESENTS UP TOP 5 Mohamed Salah celebrates scoring his second of the afternoon Tony Cascarino backs Everton to sign two strikers for Carlo Ancelotti LATEST FOOTBALL NEWS Strugglers Wigan hold Blackburn to goalless draw in Championship Redknapp calls Son ‘petulant’, but Holloway says red card for Rudiger kick was ‘soft’ West Ham’s 3-1 defeat of Watford made it three successive defeats for Javi Gracia’s side.Sebastien Haller netted twice in the second half to fire the Hammers to victory after Andre Gray cancelled out Mark Noble’s early penalty.Moussa Djenepo scored a stunning first goal for Southampton in their 2-0 win at Brighton. Getty Images – Getty 5 FAREWELL Crystal Palace stunned Manchester United at Old Trafford to record their first victory over the Red Devils in the Premier League era.Jordan Ayew opened the scoring for the visitors, and it seemed the Eagles would be making history when Marcus Rashford wasted the chance to equalise by smashing a penalty off the post.But when Daniel James popped up in the dying stages to make it 1-1 with his second goal since his summer transfer to the Red Devils, it appeared United had rescued a point.Patrick van Aanholt did not get the memo, however, as he broke into the United half and fired past David de Gea to secure Palace an excellent three points. Ian Holloway thinks Arsenal have made a mistake in hiring Mikel Arteta AFP or licensors Premier League results on SaturdayNorwich City 2-3 ChelseaBrighton 0-2 SouthamptonManchester United 1-2 Crystal PalaceSheffield United 1-2 LeicesterWatford 1-3 West HamLiverpool 3-1 ArsenalPremier League fixtures on SundayBournemouth vs Manchester CityTottenham vs NewcastleWolves vs BurnleySaturday is GameDay on talkSPORT and talkSPORT 2 as we become your go to destination for all the Premier League action. We’ll bring you LIVE commentary of Premier League games across all three time slots on Saturday – 12.30pm, 3pm and 5.30pm – delivering award-winning coverage to more GameDay listeners than ever. What every Premier League club’s fans dream of this Christmas Getty OFF Getty Images – Getty latest Abraham scored his first ever goal for Chelsea and later added a second 5 Man United transfer news live: Haaland ‘wants a change’, two players off in January rookie error Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Matic one of two players for sale with ‘two Premier League clubs’ interested 5 Job done for Salah and Van Dijk A ruthless Liverpool gave Arsenal a lesson in prolificacy as they secured a 3-1 win at Anfield on Saturday.Mohamed Salah, with a penalty and a superbly-taken individual effort, made it three for the campaign after Joel Matip’s first league goal in 11 months broke the deadlock just before half-time, with substitute Lucas Torreira scoring a consolation five minutes from the end.Having won all three of their games this season, Liverpool top the Premier League table, while a first defeat for Arsenal leaves them second. on target Top scorer in 2019: Messi, Mbappe and Sterling trailing Europe’s top marksman The hosts were reduced to 10 men inside the first half-hour as Florin Andone was dismissed for a disgusting challenge, with Djenepo and Nathan Redmond netting for Saints after the break.Leicester beat Sheffield United 2-1 to claim their first win of the season.Boyhood Sheffield Wednesday fan Jamie Vardy and Foxes starlet Harvey Barnes scored either side of Oli McBurnie’s equaliser to maintain Leicester’s unbeaten start to the campaign. Vardy and Barnes fired Leicester to victory deals Getty Images – Getty Van Aanholt’s goal will go down in Crystal Palace folklore Liverpool news live: Klopp reveals when Minamino will play and issues injury update stalemate LATEST targets Chelsea won their first match of the season as Frank Lampard’s decision to trust in youth paid off against Norwich.Tammy Abraham scored a brace with Mason Mount adding a goal of his own to down the Canaries 3-2 at Carrow Road. 5last_img read more

Murty faces Cummings dilemma ahead of Celtic clash

first_imgGraeme Murty faces an Old Firm dilemma after watching Jason Cummings fire himself into derby contention with his first ever senior hat-trick.The on-loan Nottingham Forest striker made the most of his chance deputising for injured winger Jamie Murphy as Rangers hammered Falkirk to reach the Scottish Cup semi-finals.He bagged twice before the break and claimed the match ball with his third 14 minutes from time as the Light Blues overcame Paul Hartley’s men 4-1.Rangers’ reward for that victory is a Hampden date with Celtic next month but before that they host Brendan Rodgers’ treble-chasing Hoops in Premiership action next Sunday. But with Murphy battling to be fit for that Ibrox showdown, Murty says he faces a major decision as he weighs up whether or not to stick with hero Cummings.“It’s a good headache for me to have as Jamie will probably be back fit, so do I then drop someone who has scored a hat-trick?” pondered the Rangers manager.“At the moment it’s questionable if Jamie will be fit but if I know him, he will be doing everything in his power to convince me he is all right.“We will have to wait and see. I brought Jason in because he needs minutes and he needs to get some sharpness. “I thought his finishes were really good and indicative of a player who is hungry to do well.”Cummings fired Rangers ahead after 16 minutes as he beat Bairns goalkeeper Robbie Thomson from a tight angle.Falkirk skipper Aaron Muirhead levelled for the visitors four minutes later as he deflected a Craig Sibbald strike into the net.But his goal was quickly cancelled out as Cummings prodded home within a minute of the equaliser before Muirhead then went from hero to zero by putting through his own net just before half-time.Cummings completed his hat-trick late on as he buried Thomson’s spill from an Alfredo Morelos strike.Falkirk boss Hartley said: “It was a free hit for us today. But if you switch off at the top end, at the top level, you definitely get punished.”last_img read more

Law and Order comes to Cape Town

first_img23 August 2011 The only people you expect to solve a grisly murder scene in an hour are the detectives from the Law and Order television series, which will soon be set and filmed in Cape Town. The popular US legal drama will hit South African shores in 2012, with an all-South African cast. The South African series follows similar localised versions produced in Russia, France and the UK. Denis Lillie, the CEO of The Cape Film Commission (CFC), said: “Africa HD has secured the format rights to a South African franchise of Law and Order. They intend to start filming the 12-part series in May 2012. “The CFC has promised to give them hands-on assistance with securing locations, permits and any other aspects to do with filming that they will require.” The crew working on the set will also be largely South African, which will create jobs in the local film industry and, according to CFC, “each of the 12 episodes will generate around R3-million (US$419 000) for the local economy”. Although Capetonians may experience some disturbances during filming, the overall impact of the project will be positive. Lillie said: “The road closures and minor inconveniences associated with the shoot will be offset multiple times by the gains the region will incur.” A global satellite and cable channel in high definition, and dedicated to African content, is also on the cards for Africa HD in the future.Cape Town in the spotlight Viewers of the locally filmed series will be taken on a virtual tour of Cape Town, enhancing the tourism appeal of the Western Cape province. Alderman Grant Pascoe, the tourism, events and marketing councillor for the City of Cape Town, said: “The City of Cape Town is fully behind this project and we will ensure that the producers experience Cape Town as the film-friendly city that it is. “The decision to film this series here in Cape Town will strengthen the city’s brand both as a tourist and film destination.” Alan Winde, Western Cape minister of economic development and tourism, described the project as a “coup for the region”. News of the series coming to Cape Town follows a string of other accolades notched up by the city this year. These include Cape Town International Airport winning the top airport in Africa award, the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business’s MBA being rated the 60th best in the world, and Capetonian Luke Taylor making it into the finals of the 2011 Google Science Fair competition.Law and Order, the franchise The original police-procedure and legal drama series, created by Dick Wolf and set in New York, was first aired by NBC on 13 September 1990. The show lasted 20 seasons and was finally cancelled by NBC on 24 May 2010. The series won several Emmys and in 2002 was ranked 24th on the TV Guide’s 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time. The format of the show has two parts: the first starts with the discovery of a crime and then shows how detectives solve it. The second phase is set in the courtroom and shows the suspect’s trial. The New York version of the series incorporated leading newsmakers into its storyline, including former city mayor Rudy Giuliani and attorney William Kunstler. This trend of localising the drama will be followed in the Cape Town production next year. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more