Perez: It’s a lie that Real Madrid paid De Gea 10 million euros

first_img CEST Upd. at 16:02 After the move collapsed — due to the paper work not being uploaded on time — reports surfaced that Madrid would have to pay De Gea to compensate him for not signing him. Sport EN Real Madrid president Florentino Perez has slammed the reports which have suggested Los Blancos have had to pay David de Gea 10 million euros for failing to sign him in the summer.  “[It’s being said] by the same people who have been saying since I arrived at the club that I would make Madrid a PLC.center_img De Gea’s move to Madrid fell through on the final day of the transfer window, with the Spanish goalkeeper instead remaining with Manchester United, where he signed a new contract last week.  “Every day [since the move fell though], I have heard that we had to pay 10 million euros for not signing De Gea, but that is a lie,” Perez said.  20/09/2015 “Fifteen years later, they are still accusing me of corrupting assemblies.”last_img read more

Monash lanes closed

first_imgBy Helena Adeloju Monash Freeway outbound lanes between the South Gippsland Freeway and Princes Highway will be closed from Saturday…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Galway Athletics Report

first_imgTuam AC had a number of squads competing, with their Under 11 Boys team placing fourth team home, just off a team medal, with great runs from the entire squad. Individually, Sean Cotter of Craughwell AC ran superbly to place fifth at U15 level, as did his clubmate Ben Ryan, placing eighth overall in the U17 event with a well-paced race.Isabella Burke of GCH put in a tremendous performance in the U13 Girls with a 10th place finish, with the GCH U13 Girls team, the current County and Connacht Champions just outside the medals in 4th place.At senior level, GCH fielded a Men’s team in the hugely competitive National Novice, with mountain runner Andrew O’Donnghaile in his element, running a storming race to place ninth overall less than forty seconds off the winner.GCH placed 16th team with Talon Thompson, Neill Keane, Michael Kerrin, Brian Bruton and Niall Murphy all competing for the city team. In the Ladies race Galway native Caoimhe Daniels formerly with GCH,  won the Novice ladies team title with Sportsworld AC of Dublin, while Catherine Thornton of Spiddal, running with Crusaders won a bronze team medal. Caron Ryan of Craughwell AC took pride of place among the Galway athletes competing, in winning National bronze in the U19 Girls with a strong run over the testing 4km circuit. Ryan has trained and raced very well all season and this result was a well-earned breakthrough at National level for her. GCH – 4th team at the National U13 Cross CountryL to R Rachel Fahy, Isabella Burke, Ava McKeon, Leana Ni Dhonncha, Aoibhe Joyce and Clodagh Quirke. Baseline Meet at Athlone ITSeveral of Galway’s top sprinters and middle-distance runners opened their Indoor season with good performances at the Baseline Meet in Athlone IT last Wednesday.Jack Dempsey of GCH won his heat in the 150m in 16.88 and was third in the 60m in 7.02, while clubmate Diego Brule also impressed winning a 150m heat. Nicole King also GCH ran a fast 150m to take second and a PB over 300m of 40.75 to place third, while Aisling Joyce of NUI Galway won the Ladies 1000m race in a fast 3.04.center_img GCH – 4th team at the National U13 Cross CountryL to R Rachel Fahy, Isabella Burke, Ava McKeon, Leana Ni Dhonncha, Aoibhe Joyce and Clodagh Quirke.The National Juvenile Uneven Ages, and Novice Cross Country Championships, were held on a demanding, hilly and muddy course at Waterford IT yesterday. Christmas Athletics EventsThe following upcoming road race fixtures will take place in Galway over the festive periodThe famous Athenry 10 km takes place St Stephens Day at 11 am, with race entry still available online on athenryac.comThe annual Resolution Run 5km takes place New Year’s Day at 11.30 am, routing through Galway City and along Grattan Road, with Race HQ at the Claddagh Hall. Entries are open on Active.com.print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img read more

Nadal breaks 34-year-old McEnroe record

first_imgWorld number one Rafa Nadal set a new record of winning 50 consecutive sets on a single surface by beating Argentine Diego Schwartzman 6-3 6-4 on Thursday to reach the Madrid Open quarter-finals.The Mallorcan surpassed John McEnroe’s previous record of 49 consecutive sets on carpet which had stood since 1984 by seeing off 13th seed Schwartzman and claiming a 21st consecutive win on clay.Nadal will face Austrian Dominic Thiem in the last eight on Friday in pursuit of a sixth Madrid Open title after beginning the claycourt season by winning an 11th Monte Carlo Masters and lifting the Barcelona Open trophy for the 11th time.Nadal said he was unaware of the record.“These moments I don’t go out there and think about these kind of things. I just think about my opponent, what I have to do to keep on going. That’s all,” Nadal told a news conference.“When my career is over, these are things that are going to be there for always. They are big records. It’s difficult to be able to win 50 sets in a row. But I’ve done it. Let’s not talk about that any more and let’s continue on what we have ahead.”World number six Juan Martin del Potro crashed out of the tournament after Serbia’s Dusan Lajovic came back from a set down to beat the Argentine 3-6 6-4 7-6(6) in the third round.Del Potro looked in complete control as he converted two break-point opportunities to take the opening set but Lajovic, ranked 95th in the world, dug deep to stay in the contest.A break midway through the second set was enough for Lajovic to force a decider before he wrapped up his first career victory over a top-10 opponent in the tiebreak.“It’s for sure my best win, and definitely one of the best matches I’ve played,” the Serbian said. “I still am not believing it 100 percent, but I know I deserved to win today.”In the quarter-finals, Lajovic will meet South Africa’s Kevin Anderson who overcame German Philipp Kohlschreiber 6-3 7-6(7).Britain’s Kyle Edmund followed up his surprise win over Novak Djokovic by defeating world number 10 David Goffin to reach the last eight of an ATP Masters 1000 event for the first time in his career.The 23-year-old broke his Belgian opponent’s serve twice in the opening set and once in the second, to seal a 6-3 6-3 victory in an hour and 12 minutes.“I managed my game very well,” the Briton said. “My game is better the better I manage it and pick the moments not to be aggressive.CONFIDENCE BOOSTEREdmund will next face Canadian teenager Denis Shapovalov, who achieved a 6-4 6-4 win over compatriot Milos Raonic.“It was definitely one of my best days on clay,” said 19-year-old Shapovalov, who is ranked 43rd in the world, 19 places below Raonic. “To be on the court against such a legend for me, and for my country, it was an honour.“What (Raonic) does for our country, for tennis, for these past couple years, it’s incredible. To beat him, it was a huge confidence booster for me.”American John Isner also advanced to the quarter-finals after overcoming Uruguayan Pablo Cuevas in a tight match 7-6(9) 7-6(3) 7-6(4). He will play German Alexander Zverev, who beat Argentine Leonardo Mayer 6-4 6-2.last_img read more

Amazonian city drags down fish stocks in 1,000-kilometer shadow

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon People, Amazon Rainforest, Animals, Biodiversity, Bushmeat, Conservation, Defaunation, Deforestation, Development, Economics, Environment, Fish, Fishing, Forest People, Forests, Freshwater Animals, Freshwater Ecosystems, Hunting, Overfishing, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Rivers, Tropical Forests, Tropical Rivers, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation A study of tambaqui, a popular table fish, in the Brazilian Amazon found that fish caught near the city of Manaus are half the size of those upriver.Boats that buy the fish have brought the demand into the forest surrounding the city, and with holds full of ice, they’re able to travel further to bring tambaqui back to Manaus’ markets.The fishers living in the relatively pristine forest along the Purus River reported that tambaquie are smaller and harder to catch than they were previously, a trend extended 1,000 kilometers from Manaus, the researchers found. The sweet-tasting tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) is a popular staple on grills and dinner tables in Manaus, Brazil. But as the human population of the Amazonian city has soared, the effects of growing demand for this fruit-eating fish have rippled through the ecosystem, affecting tambaqui living as many as 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) away.The hunt for tambaqui has gotten more difficult and the fish have become smaller, even at that distance, a team of scientists reported Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.According to the study, tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) caught near the metropolis of Manaus in Brazil are about half the size of those about 1,000 kilometers upriver. Photo by Karg se (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 ], via Wikimedia Commons“I think anyone would expect there to be a small effect around the city,” said Daniel Tregidgo, an ecologist at Lancaster University in the U.K. and lead author of the study, in an interview. “The real thing that sticks out about the study is the distance you can travel — a thousand kilometers along a river — and still have this effect.”Indeed, tambaqui caught around Manaus, a city of 2.1 million people, were about half the size of those snagged upriver. But, in interviews with nearly 400 fishers living in the forest along a 1,267-kilometer (787-mile), Tregidgo and his colleagues revealed a “defaunation shadow” that extends far beyond the city’s edges. Studies on bushmeat hunting in the vicinity of urban areas have shown a similar pattern in other tropical areas such as the Congo basin.The authors of the current study postulate that the effects of the decline of these fish, especially the large ones, could spill over into the rainforest itself.“Tambaqui can disperse seeds farther than almost any [fruit-eating] animal yet studied, and this dispersal distance increases with body size,” they write. That would limit the spread of plants that depend on tambaqui to ferry their seeds throughout the ecosystem.The Amazon’s tambaqui could be a harbinger of the impact that urbanization is having on wildlife in some of the most biodiverse regions of our planet. Currently, some 18 million people live in the towns and cities of the Brazilian Amazon — about 75 percent of the people living in the region. That’s a major shift since 1950, when three-quarters lived in rural areas, the authors report. In Manaus, they seem to have brought their appetites for wild-caught tambaqui with them.Wild-caught tambaqui are popular table fish in the city of Manaus. Photo by Omnitarian [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia CommonsFor this study, the Purus River served as an ideal laboratory to investigate how demand might be leading to overfishing.“There’s no river that brings more fish to the city,” Tregidgo said.And yet, traveling away from the city, the signs of the metropolis quickly give way to dense forest that dominates the banks of the Purus, he added. Also absent from the river are many of the signs of human impact that can “mask” the effects of fishing pressure, such as dams, mining, logging, and pollution.“The big issue is basically fishing,” Tregidgo said. “The fact that we can separate that out is quite unique.”The team’s conversations with rural fishers along the Purus centered on the methods they use to target tambaqui, the size of the fish they catch and how much effort it takes, as well as the changes to those aspects they’ve witnessed in their lifetimes.It’s gotten harder to catch tambaqui, they said, and the fish are smaller than they used to be. At the same time, when fishermen and women are successful, they’re able to sell their catch more readily.Fish buyers from Manaus, toting ice to keep the fish fresh for longer distances, make regular trips up the Purus River and become steady customers for the fishers. These boats effectively daisy-chain the city’s demand for tambaqui deeper into the rainforest than ever before.“It really does make people go after this fish specifically,” Tregidgo said, “even though today, there is a lesser chance of getting it.”CITATIONSTregidgo, D. J., Barlow, J., Pompeu, P. S., de Almeida Rocha, M., & Parry, L. (2017). Rainforest metropolis casts 1,000-km defaunation shadow. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201614499.Banner image of a tambaqui by Rufus46 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

‘Record’ number of migratory species protected at October wildlife summit

first_imgAnimals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Cats, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Fish, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Leopards, Lions, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Mammals, Migration, Oceans, Primates, Sharks, Whale Sharks, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannoncenter_img The Convention on Migratory Species adopted 34 proposals to protect species threatened with extinction.Attendees adopted proposals to bolster protections for chimpanzees, giraffes, leopards, lions and whale sharks.India will host the next such meeting in 2020. Attendees at the world’s largest wildlife conference have called for stepping up protection for 34 migratory species, including giraffes, whale sharks and two of Africa’s big cats.“Migratory animals play a critical role in our planet’s ecosystem,” said Theresa Mundita Lim, director of the Biodiversity Management Bureau in the Philippines, in a statement at the end of the recent summit in Manila of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species (CMS) of Wild Animals.“They act as pollinators, control pests and are a source of food and income,” Lim added.A proposal to help protect a genetically isolated population of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the Arabian Sea was adopted at the CMS summit. Photo by Whit Welles Wwelles14, CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons.The CMS is sometimes referred to as the “Bonn Convention” after the German city where the agreement was signed in 1983. The latest meeting, held from Oct. 23 through 28, involved negotiations concerning species threatened with extinction, in some cases leading to the adoption of measures that require countries to halt the killing of those animals. Members of the convention also proposed and adopted measures aimed at boosting collaboration between nations within some species’ ranges.Bradnee Chambers, the executive secretary of the CMS, said in the statement that the summit “has broken all records” for attendance and the number of newly adopted proposals.The convention creates lists of animals, called appendices, based on negotiations that factor in trends affecting the conservation statuses of various species.African lions (Panthera leo) are now listed in CMS Appendix II. Photo by John C. Cannon.Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) and a subspecies of the brown bear called the Gobi bear (Ursus arctos gobiensis) are now listed in CMS Appendix I. That means that any country that has signed onto the convention is legally required to halt the killing of these animals within its borders.The number of chimpanzees, an endangered species, in Africa has been slashed by half in the last three generations, according to the CMS, due in large part to the loss of its habitat. And Gobi bears are approaching extinction, with only about 45 left in Mongolia and China.Appendix II, which encourages international cooperation to tackle conservation challenges facing migratory species, now lists giraffes (Giraffa spp.), African lions (Panthera leo), and leopards (Panthera pardus), along with chimpanzees and several shark and bat species.Giraffe numbers are down by 40 percent in the past three decades, according to the IUCN.Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) are now listed in CMS Appendix I and Appendix II. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.Members also supported cooperative agreements to protect humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the Arabian Sea, where they’re genetically isolated from other members of the same species. In all, proposals at the meeting covered 16 bird, 12 mammal and six fish species.“The decisions at this meeting represent a significant achievement by governments from more than 100 countries to collaborate and take strong action to advance the conservation of migratory species,” said Susan Lieberman, the vice president for international policy with the Wildlife Conservation Society, in a statement. Lieberman added that “WCS particularly welcomes the science-based decisions” at the conference.Many countries in South America, Asia, Europe and Africa, as well as Australia, are signatories to the convention. However, the United States, Canada, China and Russia are not.“We strongly encourage the countries that are not currently Parties to CMS, including several world powers with large areas of terrestrial and marine habitat for wild migratory animals, to join the Convention,” Lieberman said.“We can only achieve our conservation and sustainable development objectives through closer collaboration on transboundary issues, and we look forward to supporting the international community on these efforts moving forward,” she added.India will host the next CMS summit in 2020.Banner image of giraffes in Tanzania by John C. Cannon.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Editor’s note: A previous version of this article misstated humpbacks’ isolation in the Arabian Sea. They are genetically isolated, not cut off.last_img read more

Biofuel project near India’s rhino heartland sparks protests

first_imgActivism, Animals, Biodiversity, Biofuels, Conservation, Elephants, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Politics, Mammals, One-horned Rhinos, Protected Areas, Rhinos, Wildlife Article published by Isabel Esterman India’s state-owned Numaligarh Refinery Limited and Finnish firm Chempolis Oy plan to build a bioethanol refinery near Kaziranga National Park in India’s Assam State.The project is touted as green and sustainable, but faces opposition from local activists who fear it will cause pollution, increase human-wildlife conflict, and negatively impact the habitat of elephants, rhinos and other wildlife.Activists also cite concerns about the project’s environmental impact assessment process, and its proposed location in an officially designated “no-development zone.” On July 15 this year, activist Soneswar Narah stepped up to express his views in a public hearing on an upcoming bioethanol refinery. The project, a joint venture between India’s state-owned Numaligarh Refinery Limited (NRL) and Finland’s Chempolis Oy, is slated to be built near Kaziranga National Park in India’s northeastern Assam state.Many locals like Narah oppose the project, saying it will have harmful impacts on Kaziranga’s fragile ecosystem and is likely to intensify human-wildlife conflicts in the Numaligarh area, given its proximity to an elephant corridor.During the public hearing, Narah said, the microphone was cut off before he could say “anything provocative,” and police barged in, dragging him away.Narah was arrested by the Assam state police and charged with multiple crimes, including “attempt to murder,” “assault or criminal force to deter public servant from discharge of his duty,” and “criminal act done by several persons in furtherance of common intention.”There are two starkly different versions of what exactly sparked Narah’s arrest.According to the official minutes of the public hearing, approved by the local government and pollution control board, Narah, an adviser to the Kaziranga-based farmers’ and tribal rights advocacy group Jeepal Krishak Shramik Sangha, “comes to stage and started speaking against the project. After that he took out the container containing combustible material which he tried to lit [sic] up in the stage which was protested by the public present and during the commotion police whisked him out of the venue as the situation became tense because of his act.”Narah refutes the allegation, calling it “an attempt to muzzle dissent.”“If I recall correctly, as Narah started expressing his concerns regarding the potential negative effects of the plant, police forcefully carried him offstage,” said Suchil Saikia, president of the local farmers’ organization Ponka Gramya Pothar Porichalona Samiti, who was also at the public hearing and corroborated Narah’s account.A wild elephant crosses a busy national highway that passes through the Deopahar Proposed Reserve Forest. Locals fear further encroachment in the forest will escalate human-wildlife conflicts. Photo by Rubul Ahmed.Wherever the truth lies, the incident at the July public hearing highlights the tensions this project has created in one of India’s most politically and ecologically sensitive regions.Jeepal has criticized the proposed biofuel plant on several grounds: potential negative impacts on the nearby Deopahar Proposed Reserve Forest and the greater Kaziranga ecosystem, as well as pollution-related hazards in nearby residential areas; irregularities in obtaining environmental clearance for the project; and the blocking of a critical elephant corridor.The public hearing on the project was initially scheduled for May, but was delayed following a public outcry after NRL and the Assam State Pollution Control Board failed to adhere to statutory guidelines on conducting public hearings. The meeting was originally scheduled for a working day without sufficient prior notice, and was not advertised in at least two major local newspapers, as required by India’s environmental law. Narah described the timing and lack of notice as “a bid to keep critics at bay.”NRL’s public relations officials declined to comment to Mongabay about the scheduling of the meeting or other issues regarding the bioethanol plant.The spot where it is said the bioethanol project plant will be located. Photo by Rohit Choudhury.Deopahar: “an integral part of Kaziranga ecosystem”Conservationists fear the NRL-Chempolis bioethanol project will be ecologically disastrous. The proposed refinery site is in the village of Owguri Chapori, just outside the Deopahar forest and only about 20 kilometers (12 miles) east of Kaziranga National Park, a World Heritage Site that is the global stronghold of the greater one-horned rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis), and home to Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris), wild water buffalo (Bubalus arnee) and numerous other threatened and endangered species.The Deopahar forest is a 133-hectare (329-acre) patch of woodland hosting elephants and several rare species of felines, reptiles and butterflies. Though officially recognized in 1999 as a “proposed reserve forest” by the Assam State Forest Department , it has still not been granted fully protected status.“Deopahar is an integral part of the Kaziranga-Karbi Anglong ecosystem,” said Manoj Gogoi, a local conservationist and founder of Naturalists for Rehabilitation of Snakes and Birds (NRSB). He said the Kaziranga and Deopahar forests were all “one ecosystem” before human intervention led to fragmentation.Gogoi said further habitat fragmentation and loss of forest cover in the Kaziranga-Karbi Anglong landscape must be stopped. During monsoon floods, when Kaziranga’s swampy lowlands are inundated, the park’s marooned wildlife seeks refuge in the neighboring Karbi hills, and sometimes migrates as far as the Deopahar wilderness.“Deopahar forest provides shelter for the wildlife fleeing flood-affected Kaziranga National Park. There are instances when rhinos strayed out of Kaziranga [and] took shelter in Deopahar,” Gogoi said. “Deopahar is a crucial temporary habitat for Kaziranga’s wandering wildlife.”Rohini Ballav Saikia, a Kaziranga divisional forest officer, denies that the project will have a direct impact on Kaziranga’s rhino population, saying Deopahar is not known to host rhinos; but he concedes such projects are not desirable in the proximity of a critical wildlife habitat.A patch of Deopahar forest land cleared by to build a golf course. Photo by Rohit Choudhury.Claims NRL “flouts environmental laws”Although efforts to secure fully protected “reserve forest” status for Deopahar have not yet succeeded, there are regulations restricting encroachment in the forest.In 1996, when NRL was allocated land for a petroleum refinery in the area, the Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoEF) expressed grave concern over its establishment near Kaziranga. “[A] Petroleum Refinery at Numaligarh (East of Kaziranga) and the developmental activities for said refinery is likely to cause tremendous pressure on the natural resources and the wild-life habitat in the Kaziranga National Park and its surroundings,” the ministry said in an official notice. The same notification declared a prohibition on any development activities within 15 kilometers (9 miles) of the Numaligarh oil refinery.The NRL-Chempolis bioethanol plant falls within that zone. “Hence locating the biofuel plant here in Owguri is in direct violation of the 1996 MoEF directive,” Narah said.If the project is built, it won’t be the first time NRL has breached the “no-development zone.” The Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change has cited the company for a 2004 expansion of its township that violated the NDZ, as well as the construction of a pipeline through the forest without prior approval. In 2014, NRL illegally cleared a patch of Deopahar forest for a golf course, drawing the ire of the National Green Tribunal, India’s specialized forum for expediting environmental justice.Conservationists argue that the implementation of environmental laws in India has always been weak. Enforcement has taken a further downturn under the present Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government, which aggressively promotes industry and has facilitated the steamrolling of environmental clearance processes for ambitious national developmental projects like the controversial Ken-Betwa river-linking project.The NRL-Chempolis bioethanol plant, enthusiastically promoted by Prime Minister Naredra Modi, has similarly “razed through the environmental clearance process,” according to a pamphlet issued by Jeepal this July.Among the issues cited is the project’s environmental impact assessment, viewed by Mongabay, which fails to mention the presence of the Deopahar Proposed Reserve Forest near the plant. “Concealing such critical information is a serious offense, and this means obviously the EIA didn’t consider the project’s potential impacts on Deopahar forest,” Jeepal asserts.A view of Deopahar forest from afar. Photo by Suryya Chetia.The Finnish connection: “eco-friendly Finnish technology”On its website, Chempolis says the technology to be used in the plant, called Formicobio, is an environmentally sustainable and low-emission technology for processing bamboo into cellulosic ethanol.But local residents are skeptical that the process will be entirely pollution-free.“The NRL authorities here have been preaching that the technology involved in the bioethanol refinery is an eco-friendly Finnish technology,” Gautom Tanti, a resident, told Mongabay. “But we aren’t convinced. The existing NRL oil refinery has already created enough pollution-related problems in the nearby villages. The waterways in our village got contaminated after the NRL refinery came up. Particularly the wastewater and rainwater spilled from the refinery during monsoon pollutes water sources.”Tanti and other villagers believe the establishment of the proposed bioethanol plant will aggravate this problem.But while NRL has been trying hard to win over the locals by touting the “Finnish connection” in the bioethanol joint venture, Chempolis has itself gotten mired in a controversy over potential conflicts of interest. Last month, Finland’s Iltalehti newspaper reported that Chempolis has business ties to Finnish Prime Minister Juha Sipilä’s family, and that the PM lobbied for the company during a February 2016 visit to India, when the NRL-Chempolis joint venture was mooted.A one-horned rhino grazes in Kaziranga National Park, which home to the world’s largest population of the species and  is located only around 12 kilometers from the proposed project site. Photo by Satish Krishnamurthy/Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.Local resistanceOn May 22, residents of Owguri Chapori organized a massive protest against the bioethanol refinery. Tanti, who took part in the protest, says they are against the project because it will have harmful impacts on both the people and the wildlife. Locals fear it will also aggravate the already severe human-elephant conflict in the area, he added, as it verges on the Deopahar elephant corridor.As he told Mongabay how the area had turned into ground zero for human-elephant conflicts after the NRL cleared part of an elephant habitat, Tanti pulled out a worn-out placard he said was displayed at the rally in May. It reads: “Stop building biofuel plant near Deopahar, Stop making Numaligarh a battleground of man and the wild.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Criminal Lawyer Jason Doe Solves: The Case of the Money Lover

first_imgCharacters in this StoryJason Doe – defense counsel who knew there was the truth somewhereJanet Dagoseh – she was facing a preliminary hearing to establish her role in her husband’s deathDaniel Sackor – the judge who was affable in his demeanorJoshua Sackor – the prosecutor who told the defense: ‘Your witness…’Sam Weah – who was accused but claimed he was innocentSamson Dagoseh – the decedent (deceased) whose death linked his wife, who linked the accusedDorcas Soko – the woman whose name ended proceedingsA triumphant atmosphere filled the courtroom as Judge Daniel Sackor entered at 9 a.m. for the June 5 sitting with an air of affability, bordered on many years of judging criminal cases. The defendant, Janet Dagoseh was facing a preliminary hearing in a case in which she was denying culpability in the death of her husband by fire, an incident that occurred in central Monrovia, on May 25.State prosecutor Joshua Sackor walked his client through the night of the incident, to establish her innocence.“How long had you been married?”“We had been married for ten years.”“And he was a wonderful man?”“Yes, he was a man of my heart.”“Did you have any reason to kill your husband?”The defendant hesitated, wiping her eyes with a handkerchief, and gave a deep breath before adjusting her position on the witness stand: “This question has been thrown at me by many. The truth is I had no reason to kill my husband of ten years. And if anybody thinks there is any reason, let them prove it.”“Like all human relations, marriage has its ups and downs; and that, I think, is normal. That would not give me cause to hurt another human being…let alone my wonderful husband.”“Thank you,” the defense counsel said, as he walked towards his bench. He searched through documents on the table and after a couple of seconds, made three steps towards the defendant. With an unmistakable air of triumph, he solicited: “Tell us about the night your husband died, Mrs. Dagoseh.”The courtroom remained silent.“It was the night that I wish I had not lived to hear about,” she was barely audible, and the spectators in the courtroom leaned forward.“I had left the house about 6pm for choir practice. The church is located in Sinkor, and I rode a motorbike for the almost twenty-five minute ride. Practice ended about 7:30pm. There was a meeting that caused me to stay a little longer so I did not leave the church until about 8:30 p.m.”“By 9:00 p.m., I was nearing the Benson and Gurley Streets intersection when I saw the huge fire, the defendant Sam Weah coming from the house, along with lots of people, hurrying in the direction of the well-lit sky. Others milled about. I overheard their conversation about the fire which had killed a man they claimed was drunk in his bed.”“I did not think about any danger to me or whether Mr. Weah had anything to do with the fire till I got closer to the house when a neighbor met me and wondered how I managed to survive the fire.” She halted and wiped the tears from her eyes.She continued, “I came to myself about 30 minutes later in a hospital bed, because I had fainted. It was after I had been told of my husband’s death that rumors began to sweep across the community that I was apparently involved in my husband’s death since I was not killed in the incident.”“I am a broken woman and tired of life after losing my husband and the only house my parents left for me. My parents died in a blazing fire in 2009; I was the only survivor…” her voice broke again, and there were murmurs of sympathy from the audience.“When Weah saw me,” she continued, “he began to run through the large crowd of people.”“Your witness,” the prosecutor said, turning to defense counsel Jason Doe. It was clear that the woman’s testimony, along with previous ones, suggests circumstantial overtones that Sam Weah could have something to do with the blaze. However, Jason Doe knew there was too much for Mrs. Dagoseh to gain from her husband’s death, but to blame it on another, an innocent man, was hardly the way to do it.The accused did not factor too much in the prosecution’s deliberations with Mrs. Dagoseh but it was apparent that Judge Sackor had drawn up some conclusions. Nonetheless, the lawyer knew he now had the trump card to burst the case wide open. From closer observation of proceedings, he knew there was something fishy and he would chase whatever it was to ensure justice not only for his client, but for the man whose charred body was discovered after the blaze.The lawyer decided to ignore certain portions of the case and concentrate on the most pertinent points that could give any woman, the greedy type, the unholy belief that she could do away with her husband and turn around to enjoy the loot.As the lawyer approached the witness, he turned momentarily to the accused, whose eyes were filled with tears. The lawyer knew Weah had been a frequent visitor to the decedent’s house, as it was brought out in previous hearings, and it was clear that Mrs. Dagoseh was a cunning, coldhearted woman of steel. The lawyer swept his head away from the accused with a reassuring smile and strolled towards the witness.The courtroom tensed as ceiling and standing fans hummed, overshadowing the spectators with the afternoon breeze.Janet Dagoseh lifted herself as if to say, “I’m ready Jason, go ahead,” regained her composure, rolled her eyes, and threw her head back as defense counsel Jason Doe stood before her.A temporary silence followed which unnerved her, and unable to withstand the silence, she called for the tears that had been her companion since her husband died in the blazing fire that consumed two other houses, and had rendered her homeless.“Your parents died in a fire disaster in 2009?”“Yes.”“You were the only survivor?”“Yes.”“Your husband, or rather your late husband Samson Dagoseh worked for the United Consulting Company?”“Yes,” she said, “he was an accountant.”“He worked there for ten years?”“And you are aware that he had an insurance policy that says at his death you, his wife, would benefit from a life insurance amount of US$100,000?”The prosecutor was on his feet, “Leading the witness; what is the relevance of this line of questioning, Your Honor?”Judge Sackor lowered his eyeglasses and said, “Will the state prosecutor please tell us the point of this question?”“Your Honor,” Jason Doe said, “I am trying to establish a motive for murder. I am aware of the issue of relevance and the court will agree that the defendant has had a history of a fire incident that claimed her parents, leaving to her benefit a sizable amount when she had just married the decedent…”“Very well,” Judge Sackor said, “you may continue.”“Thank you, Your Honor,” Jason Doe said, and turning to the defendant, said: “You are supposed to earn 100,000 United States dollars as an insurance benefit from your husband’s death?”“Yes,” she said, lowering her head.“The last time you had a similar experience, which was in 2009, besides the house that you inherited, you received an insurance benefit of 175,000 United States dollars?”“Yes.”“At the time you had just married the decedent?”“Yes.”“You told the court that on the day of the tragic fire incident, on May 25, you went to choir practice in Sinkor and you arrived home around 9 p.m.?”“Yes.”Jason Doe, in an exciting tone, said, “We are in the raining season, Mrs. Dagoseh?”“Yes,” she said, “but the rains are not falling every day.”“But on May 25, how was the rain on that day?”“It did not rain that much.”“On the night the fire killed your husband, how much fell?”“I cannot remember.”“But you remember that you went to choir practice?”“I don’t miss choir practice.”“Yes, you don’t. But the day fire killed your husband you went to choir practice; you can only remember that you went to choir practice and not how much rain fell that day?”“Yes.”“What did you tell your friend Dorcas Soko, who visited you at the hospital the day after the fire killed your husband?”The defendant appeared surprised at the question and stared at the prosecutor.“I spoke to her as a friend.”“What did you say to Mrs. Soko when she told you that she believed you were bewitched, making reference to your past experience when your parents died? Remember you are under oath.”“I did not mean what I said.”“Tell the court what you said to Mrs. Soko.”Suddenly, the defendant slumped down in her chair, out of the spectators’ view. The bailiff, sheriff deputies and several police officers rushed forward to help. Judge Sackor readjusted himself on the bench and with a grin, beckoned the defense and the prosecutor to have a conference in his chambers.But before that the judge picked up his gavel and struck twice, announcing the adjournment of the case.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Barca ties Neymar down with 22b shillings buyout clause

first_img0Shares0000Barcelona’s Brazilian forward Neymar is widely regarded as one of the finest talents in world football. PHOTO/AFP.BARCELONA, Spain July 1 – Brazilian striker Neymar has signed a five-year contract extension which includes a buy out clause of up to 25 Billion Kenya Shillings (250 million), the Spanish club said Friday.The deal will keep the 24-year-old international, widely regarded as one of the finest talents in world football, at Barcelona until June 30, 2021, the club said in a statement. “The player’s buy out clause has been fixed at 200 million euros for the first year of his contract, 222 million for the second and 250 million for the remaining three years,” the statement added.The previous buy out clause was 190 million euros.The club said it will formally present the new deal in Barcelona on July 15, before Neymar joins up with the Brazilian national side for the Olympic Games.Neymar was already under contract until 2018 with Barcelona, having transferred in 2013 from Brazil’s Santos.That transfer deal has haunted the club because of alleged hidden payments that have sparked legal action.The prolific Brazil striker has played brilliantly for the Catalan club as part of a much feared attacking trident alongside Lionel Messi and Luis Suarez.Speculation had mounted around whether or not Neymar would extend his stay at the Camp Nou or make another lucrative move.Paris Saint-Germain, Real Madrid, Manchester United and Manchester City had been named as possible suitors.“I am very happy to continue living this dream. Long live Barca and long live Catalonia!” Neymar wrote on Twitter on Thursday after his agents announced the player would sign a new five-year contract.Neymar has been a huge success for Barca on the pitch but a judicial nightmare off it.He helped them win the Spanish league last season for the second year in a row, narrowly beating their fierce rivals Real Madrid.But he has been investigated in Brazil and Spain over his transfer from Santos.Barcelona agreed on June 13 to pay a 5.5-million-euro ($6.2 million) fine over the transfer in a deal with prosecutors that sees the club avoid trial on tax evasion charges.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

50-foot-tall tree ripped from yard

first_imgTHOUSAND OAKS – It’s not enough to leave home and worry someone will rip off your hi-def TV, Luis Vuitton handbags and prized golf clubs. Kelley Fornatoro returned from vacation this month to find someone had ripped out her 50-foot pepper tree – roots, stump and all. “I am so mad,” said Fornatoro, 41, standing in her bare backyard, her newly exposed ground cover withering in the sun. “I haven’t slept I’ve been so upset.” Fornatoro, a single mom who teaches at Woodland Hills Elementary School, said she had just returned from a weeklong vacation Aug. 10 when one of her two young sons said: “Hey, Mom, the tree’s gone.” Sure enough. The towering backyard shade tree – a major selling point for the $625,000 home in the 2200 block of Rusticpark Court, which is now on the market – had disappeared. Its only trace was some sawdust left in the street. Where it had stood was a freshly landscaped patch to match its nook in the corner of her yard. Tree specialists estimated the cost to replace the five-story tree at $50,000 to $60,000, including the cost for a crane. Neighbors said that, before Fornatoro and her family returned to their pale-yellow home, a tree trimmer and nine workers had taken two full days to saw, shred and haul off the remains of her billowing California pepper. Neighbors thought she had commissioned the removal – and were aghast to find out she hadn’t. “It’s a shame that someone took her tree down,” said Rudy Monarrez, who shares the tidy cul-de-sac built 30 years ago against Oakwood Regional Park. “They were out there chopping all day long. They were shredding a lot of stuff.” “It just boggles my mind at how unhelpful everyone has been, especially the police,” added Bruce Stanton, another neighbor. “It was a beautiful tree, one of the best in the neighborhood.” When Fornatoro called police, she said the officer was initially reluctant to take a report. Instead, she said, he remarked: “That tree being gone really opens up your yard.” Probe ongoing A Ventura County sheriff’s detective declined to comment on the investigation or whether he had a suspect. “The investigation is still ongoing,” said Detective Mike Ferguson, who is handling the case. “We received a report that a tree was taken from somebody’s backyard without permission.” He said charges, if applicable, might include felony vandalism of a tree. A police report states that an unknown person with intent not to pay the $3,500 bill called a tree service to have the tree removed. Fornatoro said Julian Rodriguez, owner of Julian’s Tree Care in Oxnard, admitted to her and to police he’d cut down her tree. She said Rodriguez told her he’d taken the job after a man named Robert called him and said that he was selling the house, that the tree must be taken down immediately, and that the bill should be sent to the house address. There was no invoice. No working phone number. There was never a final payment, he’d said. `Truly bizarre’ A man who answered Rodriguez’s business phone told the Daily News he knew nothing about the job and Rodriguez was away in Mexico. The man, who declined to give his name, said he was the business owner’s nephew. A tree trimmer said it’s unheard of in his business to enter someone’s backyard, where there might be dogs, in the homeowner’s absence. “This is truly bizarre,” said Rick Solties of R&S Tree Services in Simi Valley, who has pruned Fornatoro’s pepper tree in the past. “I’ve never come across this in any job that I’ve done. “I’ve heard of people cutting down the wrong tree, but never cutting a tree down that wasn’t theirs.” Mike Glickman, the real estate agent who is listing the house, said it’s a stain on Thousand Oaks, one of the safest cities in America. “It’s very sad for a community in general,” said Glickman, a self-employed agent who has sold real estate in the region for 30 years. “It’s like finding someone has stolen your dog from your yard. “Who steals someone’s tree?” Meanwhile, Fornatoro continues to grieve. When she discovered the tree was gone, she cried for three days. “You know, I loved that tree,” she said, verging on tears as she recalled its bountiful bowers for birds. “They tweeted, chirped. As I would wake up each morning, I would lie there and listen to them. “My tree – I just want my tree back.” dana.bartholomew@dailynews.com (818) 713-3730160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img