Rockets are gearing up for postseason tourneys

first_img BY WARREN RAPPLEYEAStaff Writer The Raritan High School wrestling team is rolling along with a 9-3 mark thanks to eight competitors who have 10 or more wins apiece. The Rockets are sitting in first place in their conference and are also looking forward to defending their NJSIAA Central Jersey Group II tourney. T.J. Mitchell (10-2 at 103 pounds); Billy Voutsinas (12-3, 112); Phil O’Hara (11-3, 119); Dave Seidenberg (14-1, 125); Kevin Whalen (12-4, 135); Shawn Putnam (13-2, 140); Rich Bryant (12-4, 215); and Jeff King (13-2, heavyweight) are all having outstanding seasons for coach Rob Nucci. In addition, Chris Rafalco is 9-7 at 130 pounds and Jason Sagos is 9-3 competing in the 145-pound division. “We’ve had good consistency throughout the lineup,” Nucci said. “So many guys have stepped up and they’re finding ways to get the job done.” The coach also praised four juniors who have held their own in some of the upper weight classes: Jim Shields (152 pounds), Kevin Gilgannon (160), Anthony Kinzel (171) and Jim Curry (189). And if that isn’t enough, Raritan has received strong contributions from several other grapplers who are likely to play prominent roles in coming seasons, Nucci said. They include junior Stephen Ip, sophomores Greg Alexander, Kevin Moore and Bobby Kolb, as well as freshmen Bob Hornacek and John Boyle. Moore is 5-2 competing mainly at 119 pounds; Hornacek is 5-1 in action at 112 pounds, and Boyle is 3-3 at 189 pounds. Raritan is coming off a tough quad-meet on Saturday, when the Rockets downed both Toms River North and Pinelands but lost to CBA in the final match. “That was disappointing, but our guys wrestled well,” Nucci said. “We have a lot of wrestling ahead of us and we’re anxious to get going in the state tournament. We just can’t look too far ahead, as we’ve got a few more matches left.” Raritan will visit Howell to compete against the host team and Central Regional on Saturday, and will host St. John Vianney on Feb. 9. Mat notes… All eyes will be on Southern Regional this weekend as teams vie for the Shore Conference Tournament championship. The SCT seeding meeting was Monday night, which determines the top 16 teams that will compete for the team title. Division winners receive automatic entry, but the committee has the say in the seeding. First-round action is slated for later today as the top four seeds will play host to three teams each in the opening and quarterfinal rounds. The winners of the first two bouts will match up in the next round. The SCT semifinals and finals will be held on Saturday at Southern. Among the local teams hoping to make some noise in the SCT are Raritan, Middletown North and CBA. The Lions have been a steady team throughout the campaign, while the Colts have been coming on strong lately, with wins over Howell and Raritan last week. Ocean Township is the likely top seed, followed by Jackson, Southern and Wall. BY WARREN RAPPLEYEA Staff Writer Balanced squad hoping to collect more hardware last_img read more

Hometown fans

first_imgMiddletown High School South fans cheer on their team as they walk out onto the field prior to the NJSIAA Central Jersey Group 3 game against Steinert High School held at Middletown South on Nov. 12. The Eagles went on to beat Steinert by a score of 35-8. ERIC SUCAR, stafflast_img

Warriors sweep Cavaliers to repeat as NBA champions

first_imgThe Golden State Warriors repeated as NBA champions with a 108-85 victory over LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers on Friday to extend a stunning run that has included three titles in the last four seasons.The fourth consecutive NBA Finals matchup between the two rivals proved to be the most lopsided as the Warriors won the latest best-of-seven series in four games, which could mark the end of James’s second tenure with the Cavs.After a sub-par performance in Game Three, Warriors guard Stephen Curry responded with a spectacular shooting night by scoring a game-high 37 points while James had a team-high 23.The Cavaliers clawed back from an 11-point deficit before pulling in front on a slam dunk from James near the midway mark of the second quarter that brought the home crowd to their feet.But it was just a matter of time before the Warriors took over.“We knew that they were going to come out with a tough first punch and we answered it and ran right back at them and set the tone for the whole game,” said Curry.“They made so many runs but over the course of 48 minutes our will took over. Unbelievable feeling to come in here on a mission and get the job done.”The Warriors, who boast what may be the greatest offensive juggernaut that basketball has ever known, used a dominant third quarter to build a 21-point lead that left the Cavaliers’ hopes of a series comeback in their wake.The Cavs had successfully faced down elimination three times this season but were unable to mount any threat of a comeback in this one as the Warriors simply had too much firepower.For Cleveland, the loss sends the team into an offseason of great uncertainty as James, the best player of his generation, could sign elsewhere as a free agent after July 1, which is widely expected given the relative lack of talent on the roster.James, who was playing in his eighth consecutive NBA Finals and fourth straight with the Cavs, has carried the team since he returned in 2014 but would likely need to see some key additions to keep him with his hometown team.When three-times champion James left the game with about four minutes to play, he did so to a standing ovation from a home crowd that were chanting “M-V-P, M-V-P.”While Cleveland were the clear underdog in the NBA Finals, they certainly had their chances, blowing a 13-point lead in Game Three and giving away a win on the road in the opener after a disastrous final 36 seconds in regulation.last_img read more

Lowry, Holmes share Open lead at the halfway mark

first_imgA year after sacking his caddie following his fourth straight missed cut in the Open, Ireland’s Shane Lowry will take a share of the lead into the third round of the year’s final major.Lowry carded a second consecutive 67 at Royal Portrush to join American JB Holmes on eight under par, with Tommy Fleetwood – who could follow Ryder Cup partner Francesco Molinari in lifting the Claret Jug – and Lee Westwood a shot behind.Olympic champion Justin Rose is a stroke further back alongside Cameron Smith and Justin Harding, with world number one Brooks Koepka ominously poised on five under in pursuit of a fifth major win in his last 10 starts.Former champion Jordan Spieth was alongside Koepka after a 67, but Tiger Woods missed the halfway cut despite battling back from his worst ever opening round in the Open with a battling 70.Lowry, who had stormed into a two-stroke lead with six birdies in his first 10 holes before dropping shots on the 14th and 18th, said: “I had a great time today, it was just unbelievable. One of those days where you find yourself pinching yourself.“I can’t explain how good the crowds were, a day that I’ll remember. Walking down 18 was something special. I’m a bit disappointed to bogey the last but I’m right where I wanted to be and delighted with my two days’ work.“I’m in a great position going into the weekend of an Open Championship but there’s two long days left. There are times when it’s not going to be easy and I’ve just got to take it on the chin.”Asked about the enormous support he will receive over the weekend, the 32-year-old from Offaly added: “Next week I’l be in Memphis and there’ll probably be 10 men and a dog following me. Tomorrow there’s going to be thousands cheering me on so I’m going to enjoy it.”Fleetwood was expected to contend for one of the game’s biggest prizes this year after his consistent displays in 2018, the Ryder Cup star finishing 17th in the Masters, second in the US Open – after a record-equalling 63 in the final round – 12th in the Open and 35th in the US PGA.However, so far this season his best result is a tie for 36th at Augusta National and the 28-year-old also failed to convert good chances to win the Arnold Palmer Invitational and Players Championship earlier in the year.A bogey on the first was quickly cancelled out by a birdie on the par-five second and Fleetwood also picked up shots on the fifth, 12th, 13th and 15th before bouncing back from a bogey on the 16th to birdie the last.“Yesterday I felt like it was a lot more stress-free, today I made two or three really good par saves but I am happy with the challenge,” said Fleetwood, who partnered Molinari to four wins out of four at Le Golf National last year.“It’s not going to be all-singing and all-dancing in majors and I was up to the test. I think all you can do is you can put yourself up there and gain experience that way and know how things pan out on a Saturday and Sunday at a major.“I think last year I teed off on the last day at five under and birdied the first and Frankie ended up with a birdie on the last to get to eight (under). I wasn’t miles away with not very long in the tournament to go so I’ve got that behind me.”Rose was also in contention at Carnoustie and finished in a tie for second, his best result in the Open since finishing fourth as 17-year-old amateur at Birkdale in 1998.“It was nice to get that monkey off my back because up until then I had not been able to beat my 17-year-old self,” the 2013 US Open champion said. “I’m not getting ahead of myself but it’s a good position to be in.”Westwood extended his own unwanted record of most top-three finishes in major championships without a victory to nine when he was joint second in the 2016 Masters and also let slip a two-shot lead after 54 holes in the 2013 Open at Muirfield.“I’m 46 years old and still competing with these young lads,” Westwood said. “I won last year so there’s no pressure on me. I just go out there and have fun.“I’ve always gone out and done my best. If it’s going to happen, it’s going to happen, and if it doesn’t, it doesn’t. Just go home and have dinner, go on holiday the next week. Do the same things, life won’t change.”last_img read more

Study finds more than 350k trees illegally felled in Madagascar’s protected areas in five-year span

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Environment, Forestry, Forests, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Illegal Trade, Law Enforcement, Logging, Research, Rosewood, Timber, Timber Laws, Trees More than 350,000 trees were felled between March 2010 and March 2015, the study states, despite being in areas that have been granted official protected status.At least one million logs were illegally exported from Madagascar during those years — that’s more than 150,000 metric tons-worth of logs, per the study.The primary target of illegal loggers is rosewood and palisander, both species belonging to the genus Dalbergia, though other precious hardwood species like ebony (in the genus Diospyros) are targeted as well. A study released this month by TRAFFIC, an NGO that monitors the wildlife trade, finds that governance has been so lacking in the forests of Madagascar in recent years that hundreds of thousands of trees have been illegally cut down in protected areas.More than 350,000 trees were felled between March 2010 and March 2015, the study states, despite being in areas that have been granted official protected status. At least one million logs were illegally exported from Madagascar during those years — that’s more than 150,000 metric tons-worth of logs, per the study.The primary target of illegal loggers is rosewood and palisander, both species belonging to the genus Dalbergia, though other precious hardwood species like ebony (in the genus Diospyros) are targeted as well.“Poor governance and corruption led to an anarchic situation with no control over timber harvesting resulting in an all-out ‘timber-rush’ with widespread felling of rosewood and ebony trees in protected areas across Madagascar, from which it will take years for the environment to recover,” Roland Melisch, TRAFFIC’s Senior Programme Director for Africa, said in a statement.Madagascar’s precious hardwood timber species are in high demand in Europe and the United States, where they’re used in the manufacture of musical instruments, and in Asia, where they’re used in high-end furniture, especially in China.The TRAFFIC study cites numerous factors that contribute to the poor management of precious timber in Madagascar, including a lack of consistent regulations governing the logging of the selectively targeted species, allegations of governmental authorities colluding with traffickers of illegal timber, a general lack of laws governing forestry (and precious hardwood species in particular), and a failure to hold well-known traffickers accountable.Madagascar adopted a prohibition on the cutting, transport, and export of precious hardwood by governmental decree in 2010. In order to bolster this measure, the country’s government also requested in 2013 that its precious timber species be listed in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), which requires that any authorized international trade be proven to not threaten the survival of the species before permits can be issued.“The application for an export permit must therefore be preceded by the issuing of a non-detriment finding (NDF),” the authors of the study note, adding that “such a finding should not be issued without having appropriate and adequate information on the status of populations in the wild, quantitative logging data, trade history and associated management systems.”Among the TRAFFIC study’s findings, however, were that information on how many rosewood and ebony trees exist in Madagascar’s forests today (what’s known as “standing timber inventories”) is “at best partial or is non-existent.” And there is no data collected by the country on timber harvests at the species level, even while data on illegal harvesting activities is “general,” meaning that the number and location of trees being cut down is not readily discernible.The study also found that “The precious timber management policy is characterized by a disconnect between management decisions (i.e. political declarations and international commitments) and their implementation on the ground.”In other words, the TRAFFIC study found that Madagascar’s precious timber management system cannot possibly guarantee that current logging activities are not a threat to the future survival of rosewood and ebony species.Mongabay’s requests for comment were not returned by Madagascar’s Ministry of Environment, Ecology and Forests.The study authors make a number of recommendations for how the government of Madagascar can address the situation, but there are already signs that change may be at hand. The country faced intense international pressure at the 2016 CITES meeting in South Africa, for instance. The CITES Secretariat ultimately called on Madagascar to audit stockpiles of precious timber species that have been seized by the government and to step up enforcement actions against illegal timber harvesting. If the country fails to adequately implement this “Timber Action Plan,” it could face trade sanctions.And during the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation held in December 2015, China signaled its willingness to help by increasing its cooperation with African countries on sustainable forest management, among other measures. As the main importer of Madagascar’s timber, China’s assistance could prove crucial.But Madagascar itself appears to be well aware of the situation, as well, having joined the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) and signed on to the Zanzibar Declaration on timber trade as well as the Southern African Development Community’s Law Enforcement and Anti-Poaching Strategy. According to TRAFFIC, these forums will not only allow Madagascar to get financial and technical support to combat the illegal trade of its precious timber, but also represent an acknowledgement that a regional strategy to combat the illegal trade in fauna and flora is required.Still, the country has a long way to go before it can ensure logging activities aren’t threatening its rosewood and ebony stocks. “Madagascar is signalling it sees the need for reform in management of its timber resources, but such agreements need to be accompanied by hard action at the highest level of government,” Nanie Ratsifandrihamanana, Country Director for WWF Madagascar, said in a statement.TRAFFIC’s Melisch said that he’s hopeful the new research will help rein in the “timber rush” underway in Madagascar’s forests: “This latest study should help the government of Madagascar to understand the issues that led to this catastrophic situation and to begin the long process of mitigating the ensuing mismanagement crisis.”Illegal rosewood stockpiles in Antalaha, Madagascar. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Climate change driving widespread local extinctions; tropics most at risk

first_imgCitations:BirdLife International and National Audubon Society (2015) The messengers: what birds tell us about threats from climate change and solutions for nature and people. Cambridge, UK and New York, USA: BirdLife International and National Audubon SocietyChen, I-C, Hill, JK, Shiu, H-J, Holloway, JD, Benedick, S, Chey, VK, Barlow, HS and Thomas, CD (2011) Asymmetric boundary shifts of tropical montane Lepidoptera over four decades of climate warming. Global Ecology and Biogeography 20: 34-45Forero-Medina G, Terborgh J, Socolar SJ, Pimm SL (2011) Elevational ranges of birds on a tropical montane gradient lag behind warming temperatures. PLoS ONE 6(12): e28535. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0028535Freeman, BG and Freeman, AMC (2014) Rapid upslope shifts in New Guinean birds illustrate strong distributional responses of tropical montane species to global warming. PNAS 111: 4490-4494Raxworthy, CJ, Pearson, RG, Rabibisoa, N, Rakotondrazafy, AM, Ramanamanjato, J-B, Raselimanana, AP, Wu, S, Nussbaum, RA, and Stone, DA (2008) Extinction vulnerability of tropical montane endemism from warming and upslope displacement: a preliminary appraisal for the highest massif in Madagascar. Global Change Biology 14: 1703-1720Schloss, CA, Nuñez, TA and Lawler, JJ (2012) Dispersal will limit ability of mammals to track climate change in the Western Hemisphere. PNAS 109: 8606-8611Şekercioğlu, C, Schneider, SH, Fay, JP and Loarie, SR (2008) Climate change, elevational range shifts, and bird extinctions. Conservation Biology 22: 140-150Wiens JJ (2016) Climate-related local extinctions are already widespread among plant and animal species. PLoS Biol 14(12): e2001104. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.2001104 Amphibian Crisis, Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Birds, Carnivores, Cats, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Extinction, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Science, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Extinction And Climate Change, Featured, Frogs, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Habitat, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Herps, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Monkeys, Overpopulation, Primates, Rainforest Conservation, Reptiles, Tropical Deforestation, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Climate change forces three fates on species: adapt, flee or die. A new meta-analysis compiled data from 27 studies to see how species distributions have changed over timescales of 10-159 years, and included 976 species. Almost half (47 percent) had seen some local populations disappear along the warming edge of their ranges.The tropics were especially vulnerable to climate change-driven local extinctions. The data showed that 55 percent of tropical and subtropical species experienced local extinctions, whereas the figure was only 39 percent for temperate species. Though the tropical data set was not large, this higher tropical risk concurs with past studies.Tropical species are at greater risk due to climate change because they live in some of the world’s hottest environments, so are already at the upper limit of known temperature adaptation, are restricted to small areas, particular rare habitats, and narrow temperature ranges, or have poor dispersal ability and slow reproductive rates.Scientists see multiple solutions to the problem: beyond the curbing of greenhouse gas emissions, they recommend conserving large core areas of habitat, and preserving strong connectivity between those core areas, so plants and animals can move more freely between them as required as the world warms. A red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus), a species found in the western Amazon, a region where many mammal species are unlikely to be able to keep pace with climate change. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerA species has just three options in the face of environmental change: move, adapt or die. As global temperatures rise many species are shifting their ranges, particularly towards the cooler poles and upslope to higher elevations. But if they can’t adapt or move, populations can be lost along the warmer edge of their range. These local population extinctions could have major implications for individual species, ecosystems and global biodiversity.New research, published in PLOS Biology, warns that local extinctions caused by climate change are already widespread. The meta-analysis, by John Wiens of Arizona University, compiled data from 27 studies that resurveyed sites to see how species distributions had changed over time. These studies spanned a range of timescales between 10 and 159 years, and encompassed 976 species. Almost half of these (47 percent) had seen some local populations disappear along the warm edge of their range. Local extinctions were prevalent in all geographic regions and taxonomic groups.“As Yogi Berra said, it is tough to make predictions, especially about the future,” said Wiens, whose research has contributed to a growing body of work that tries to forecast how biodiversity will respond to climate change. “And it is hard to tell whether your predictions are actually accurate or not. So, for this study, I changed my focus and instead asked: what has happened [due to climate change] already?”The extent of local extinctions came as a surprise, Wiens said, “given that climate has changed little relative to the much greater changes predicted in the future.”Stuart Butchart, director of science at BirdLife International expressed alarm over the results: “The fact that evidence of such population extinctions was found for about half of species, and that the pattern held across plants and animals, tropical and temperate regions, and in marine, terrestrial and freshwater systems is striking.”Keel-billed toucans (Ramphastos sulfuratus) along with other lowland species have been recorded shifting their range to higher elevations in response to rising temperatures, just one of many impacts climate change is having on biodiversity. Recent research has found that 47 percent of species studied have undergone local extinctions along the warmer edge of their range, with local extinction rates higher in the tropics than in temperate regions. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerA resplendent quetzal (Pharomachrus mocinno) in the cloud forest of Costa Rica. Tropical lowland and montane species are especially at risk from increasing temperatures due to climate change. Photo by Keith Carver on Flickr licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic licenseLocal vs. global extinctionIt’s important to note that local extinction doesn’t necessarily mean that a species is in danger of global extinction: if its range is expanding elsewhere, and it is able to move in a timely fashion, the species could be successfully responding to the changing climate.On the other hand, population extinction could indicate trouble for species that are unable to expand their range into areas with more suitable conditions — either because they can’t move quickly enough, or because there is nowhere else for them to go.So how should we interpret the widespread local extinctions that have been recorded so far?Wiens agrees that “is the big question: will these local extinctions of populations turn into global extinctions of entire species?”“The short answer is: I don’t know.” But given their prevalence, “and that global warming is predicted to increase by an additional two- to five-fold, it seems hard to think that there will not be many global extinctions also.”Trouble in the tropicsWhen Wiens compared taxonomic groups, he found that the percentage of local extinctions was higher in animals than in plants, and in freshwater over marine and terrestrial species. A geographic trend was also apparent, with 55 percent of tropical and subtropical species experiencing local extinctions, whereas the figure was lower, at 39 percent, for temperate species. This might seem counterintuitive when temperatures are rising fastest at higher latitudes — as seen in the more rapidly warming Arctic — but it is something that scientists have previously predicted based on the biology and ecology of tropical species.Tropical species live in some of the world’s hottest environments, so are already at the upper limit of known temperature adaptation. More heat means more stress, potentially beyond their ability to adapt.What’s more, tropical environments tend to be more stable throughout the year, so tropical species are adapted to a much narrower range of temperatures than their temperate counterparts.The fact that tropical species are already showing higher levels of local extinctions is especially worrying. “I think that the most important implication of this pattern is that climate-related extinctions are most likely in the part of the world that has the most species, the tropics,” said Wiens. “So, the prognosis is worse for global biodiversity than if extinctions were just spread randomly across the planet.”But others caution that more data is needed to gain a clear picture of geographic variation in local extinction rates. “A major limitation of the Wiens study is the utter lack of data from the tropics,” said Kenneth Feeley, of the University of Miami, who pointed out that once subtropical climatic regions such as Arizona were excluded, only 5 of the 27 studies that Wiens examined were from the true tropics, and only one focused on plants. “Given this lack of data it is premature to draw conclusions about local extinctions of tropical species and especially tropical plant species,” he said.Despite this caveat, Wiens’ overall conclusions tally with what Feeley and colleagues have already been observing in their own research in the forests of Central and South America. “[M]any tropical tree species in Costa Rica, Colombia and Peru are shifting their ranges to higher elevations and [..] in many cases these shifts are due primarily to species dying back, and going locally extinct, from the lower, hotter portions of their ranges.”Reptiles and amphibians such as the Tsaratanana chameleon (Calumma tsaratananensis) on Madagascar’s highest mountain may soon run out of cold-edge habitat to expand into. Photo by Christopher RaxworthyThe devil is in the detailsA great number of variables make a thorough assessment of tropical extinction potential challenging, but many factors added together tip toward higher future local extinction rates. For species in the middle of a vast lowland tropical region, such as the Amazon or Congo basins, for example, cooler temperatures, and suitable habitats, can be many hundreds of kilometers away, making a timely escape along a temperature gradient almost impossible.Common traits of tropical species don’t bode well either: “In general, species with certain characteristics, such as being restricted to small areas, restricted to particular rare habitats, having poor dispersal ability and slow reproductive rates are most extinction-prone. These are characteristics of many tropical species,” explained Jane Hill, a professor at York University, UK.“Given the long generation times and narrow niches of many tropical tree species, there is good reason to predict that many […] simply won’t be capable of tolerating hotter temperatures and will go locally extinct,” said Feeley.Though we might not see the impacts immediately, cautions Naia Morueta-Holme, an ecologist at University of California, Berkeley: species that might look as though their range is stable could be building up an “extinction debt” — a time delay in which the extinction of a species in the future is due to events in the past.“[L]ong-lived plants like trees can often survive in more extreme environments, long after they have stopped being able to reproduce,” she noted. “In such cases, it will take longer time for us to see climate-driven local extinctions.”A valley in the upper Amazon, where lowland forest begins to rise towards the Andes in southern Peru. Lowland tropical species can be challenged by distances of hundreds of kilometers between their current range and cooler regions that might offer suitable habitat in the future. Characteristics typical of many tropical species — such as poor dispersal and slow reproductive rates — exacerbate the threat. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerWho’s at risk?Aside from the trees themselves, lowland forest species at greatest risk of being left behind in the race to reach suitable habitat include understory birds, primates and small mammals.A study of nearly 500 Western Hemisphere mammal species conducted by University of Washington scientists identified the western Amazon as the region in greatest trouble, with 14.5 percent of species predicted to be unable to keep up with habitat shifts. Primates in Central and South America face average range reductions of 75 percent over the coming century, the study concluded; many of these species are already threatened with extinction, such as the Endangered white-bellied spider monkey (Ateles belzebuth), and white-nosed saki monkey (Chiropotes albinasus) — which raises another point; climate change is just one of many human-caused stressors in the tropics, ranging from soy and oil palm agribusiness expansion, to logging and wildlife trafficking.On tropical mountains, species may face another problem, even though cooler temperatures are more easily and immediately available to wildlife and plants further upslope: they might simply run out of room at the top. As the world warms, species pushed higher find themselves struggling to survive on smaller and smaller mountaintop islands of habitat.A study of moths on Borneo’s Mount Kinabalu by Hill and colleagues revealed that most species’ ranges had shifted significantly upwards over 42 years, but cool edge expansion had proceeded faster upslope than warm edge contraction. Although this has kept range sizes stable for the time being, at high elevations movement upwards is likely to be limited by the geology of the mountain, which makes it unsuitable habitat for the moths. As a result, several endemic species could be at risk of extinction with continued warming.Mount Karimui, New Guinea. Montane species may be able to shift their range upslope — as has been seen in a range of species including trees, insects and birds — but higher elevations may not always offer suitable habitat and species can also end up being “pushed off” the top of the mountain. Photo by Benjamin FreemanWhite-winged Robin (Peneothello sigillata), caught as part of a study of New Guinea birds’ responses to climate change, and identified as one of four species likely to become extinct on Mount Karimui by 2100. Photo by Benjamin FreemanBirds on New Guinea’s Mount Karimui face a similar problem. A study by Benjamin Freeman, of the University of British Columbia, found that 40 out of 64 bird species had seen range contractions at lower elevations, with four upper elevation species likely to be lost from the mountain by 2100.So far, “[t]here haven’t been many documented cases of such mountaintop extinctions,” he said. “For example, the two bird species that [renowned researcher] Jared Diamond found living only on the top of Mount Karimui in the 1960s were still living only at the top of Mount Karimui in 2012.”Freeman, whose work was included in Wiens’ study, also emphasized that “[w]hat Wiens terms a local extinction could be a population shifting upslope 50 meters, and on a steep mountain slope this might not be what we typically think of as an ‘extinction.’”Çağan Şekercioğlu, of the University of Utah, has studied how the elevational range of bird species affects their chances of extinction under climate change projections. In a study of the world’s land birds “[the] already endangered scissor-tailed hummingbird (Hylonympha macrocerca) ended up as one of the most vulnerable species,” he said, “as it is a tropical forest understory resident limited just to the Paria Mountains of Venezuela and to elevations between 530-1,200 meters [1,700-3,900 feet].” The population stands at just 3000-4000 individuals, and habitat conversion to agriculture, coupled with the relatively low height of the mountain at just 1,371 meters (4,500 feet), means the species is rapidly running out of space. Overall, the study predicted that hundreds of bird species would go extinct, and thousands would be at risk of extinction, by 2100 due to the interaction between narrow elevational range, loss of habitat and climate change.In the Peruvian Andes, the picture for some bird species is more hopeful, thanks to the availability of high quality, protected habitat, said German Forero-Medina, of the Wildlife Conservation Society Colombia.Forero-Medina’s study of birds in the Cerros del Sira of central Peru, also featured in Wiens’ analysis. He found that although upwards shifts were evident, they were smaller than predicted due to warming. “The area is protected by the Reserva Comunal El Sira and the vegetation is in good condition, so [most birds] should have space to move.” However, he highlighted the endemic Sira Tanager (Tangara phillipsi), with a narrow elevational range, as a species in need of close monitoring for population declines.The only African data in Wiens’ study was for frogs and reptiles on the highest mountain in Madagascar. For these species, living on the Tsaratanana massif in the north of the country, things are not looking good. “They have very little available cold edge habitat left for them to expand into,” explained Christopher Raxworthy, curator of herpetology at the American Museum of Natural History, who led the research. “Essentially warming could push them up and off the top of the mountain,” with the same issue facing endemic species on at least 9 other mountain systems in Madagascar, he said.Madagascar giant treefrog (Cophyla alticola). Endemic species on at least 9 other mountain systems in Madagascar are also at risk. Photo by Christopher RaxworthyEcosystem impactsIt’s not just the potential loss of individual tropical species that’s a cause for great concern. Species interactions will also be disrupted as animals and plants move, adapt or die, which will irrevocably alter complex interrelationships within habitats, ecosystems, and even biomes. “It is likely that we will see considerable disruption to ecological communities, with changes in the dynamics between predators and prey, competitors, diseases and parasites and their hosts,” said Butchart.“The other worry is: what happens to tropical forests at sea level?” said Freeman. Without species coming into the lowlands from somewhere even hotter, these biodiverse regions may undergo a depopulating transformation. “Do lowland plants and animals shift up and leave sea level tropical forests impoverished (termed “biotic attrition”) or not? We really don’t know the answer yet.”Local extinctions, with or without biotic attrition, “will lead to changes in forest composition, structure and function,” said Feeley. “Given the extreme interconnectedness of tropical forest species and systems, these changes can in turn lead to more and more extinctions.”Adding to all these hazards, tropical animals will likely find their movements in response to climate change blocked by all things human: long built and newly built fences, roads, railways, soy and oil palm plantations, cities and towns all offer impediments to movement and could add to extinctions.Forest only survives along a river in an agricultural landscape in Costa Rica. Keeping habitat connected by protecting corridors, especially those spanning elevational gradients, is an urgent priority in mitigating climate impacts on biodiversity. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerConservation prioritiesWhether in the mountains or the lowlands, ever-growing barriers to movement — the result of habitat loss and deforestation, infrastructure development and industrial agriculture — will make keeping up with climate change even harder.When it comes to taking action to mitigate these impacts, there is a lot of agreement among scientists: make sure that habitat stays connected. “Overall, I would say that the highest priority is to protect corridors of intact habitat that span from the lowlands to the highest elevations,” said Wiens.Hill agrees: “[i]n more connected landscapes species can reach new areas and hence maintain their overall range size (even though the range location has shifted),” she said. “Intact rainforest plays an important role in buffering forest species from the detrimental impacts of climate change. So conserving large tracts of well-connected rainforest is key in this context.”Protecting habitat will benefit people as well as biodiversity: “Local extinctions of plant species could have devastating impacts for human populations in the developing world,” said Wiens. “Many people rely on just a few grass species to prevent starvation.”“In some cases, conserving montane forest may make a ton of sense for people-focused conservation as well,” agreed Freeman, who added that “watershed protection and forest conservation go hand-in-hand.”Morueta-Holme thinks these arguments are especially relevant in the tropics where “millions of people are highly dependent on local natural resources.”Scientists ask: what happens to tropical forests at sea level? Without species coming into the lowlands from somewhere even hotter, these biodiverse regions, like this coastal area in Brazil, may be depopulated as climate change advances. The question remains largely unstudied. But such issues urgently need to be addressed as temperatures rise. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerOther scientists emphasize the importance of getting a better handle on the specific ways in which species are responding to climate change, especially because not all species respond in the same way, or to the same environmental triggers: for some, rainfall determines habitat suitability more than temperature, for example. Sensitivity to different environmental factors may explain why, counter intuitively, some species have been recorded moving downslope rather than up, or are maintaining stable ranges, despite climate change.“The first thing is establishing monitoring programs, so that elevational shifts can be detected if they are occurring,” said Raxworthy.Feeley concurs: “In my opinion, the number one conservation priority for the tropics is collecting and collating more data. We cannot hope to protect forests from future climate change if we don’t know how species are already responding to current climate change.”“[T]here is an urgent need to better understand the mechanisms involved” in how the most threatened species respond to climate change, said Forero-Medina. “It is time to move from patterns to mechanisms, this will help guide conservation decisions for those species.”“I think that the highest priority is to reduce global warming in addition to mitigating its effects. The potential consequences for global biodiversity and humans are just too severe,” concluded ​Wiens. “Two of the biggest threats to global biodiversity are habitat destruction and climate change, and they seem to have synergistic effects,” he said.But this synergism could also be beneficial if appropriate action is taken in time. “Preserving habitats can help reduce the negative impacts of climate change,” Wiens explained. “And intact forests and other habitats can help suck up the carbon that causes global warming in the first place.” FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Activists seek protection for Indonesia’s karst amid building boom pressure

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Activists in Indonesia demand the government to issue a new regulation aimed at better protecting the country’s karsts, the unique rocky landscapes that are home to species found nowhere else on Earth.The current regulation governing the management of this limestone topography fails to frame karst preservation in terms of its role as an ecosystem supporting a diverse range of animal and plant life.Activists argue that efforts to regulate the protection of the landscape have received opposition from influential powers that depend on the mineral deposits that make up the karst. YOGYAKARTA, Indonesia — Activists in Indonesia have called for the government to issue a new regulation aimed at better protecting the country’s karsts, the unique rocky landscapes that are home to species found nowhere else on Earth.The current regulation governing the management of this limestone topography dates from 2012, issued by the ministry for mines and energy, which frames karst preservation in terms of its geological importance rather than its role as an ecosystem supporting a diverse range of animal and plant life.“We need a regulation with a special agency that oversees the function, exploitation and protection of karst ecosystems,” said Wahyu Perdana, campaign manager for food, water and essential ecosystems at the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), at a public discussion last month.Mining activities in a karst area in Rembang, Central Java. Photo by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.Petrasa Wacana, coordinator for conservation, advocacy and campaign at the Indonesian Speleology Community (MSI), called for a government regulation — which would supersede the ministerial one — that would more holistically govern the management of karst ecosystems, including allowing better conservation efforts and imposing stricter punishment for damage to or destruction of these landscapes.A draft government regulation, known as an RPP, has been in the works since 2010, but opposition from the ministry of mines and the cement industry — which has long eyed the mineral deposits that make up the karst — has prevented it from being issued, according to Petrasa.“If the government continues to be weak in protecting karst ecosystems, the damage will expand and increase the threat of an ecological disaster, particularly drought,” he said. “The importance of a government regulation for karsts is for us to be able to calculate the damage and to design efforts to protect the ecological system.”There’s increased urgency to strengthen the protection of these unique landscapes, as the administration of President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo pushes an ambitious infrastructure-building program that has seen cement companies ramp up their production. Mining activities, plantations and large developments such as roads and resorts also continue to pose a threat to Indonesia’s karsts, which span an estimated 154,000 square kilometers (59,500 square miles), or more than 8 percent of the country’s territory.The extractive industries, including mining of limestone for cement, accounted for 48 percent of Indonesia’s total carbon dioxide emissions, according to a 2014 report from the environment ministry.More than 40 percent of the 72,500 square kilometers (28,000 square miles) of karst in East Kalimantan and Central Kalimantan, two provinces on the Indonesian part of Borneo, are currently under threat from miners, according to Walhi. Similar activities also threaten the biodiversity in karst ecosystems in other provinces, including 190 square kilometers (73 square miles) in South Sulawesi, 254 square kilometers in Aceh and 6.5 square kilometers in West Sumatra.Limestone mining site in Gunung Kidul, Yogyakarta. Photo by Tommy Apriando/Mongabay-Indonesia.Formed millions of years ago by sea life, the eroded limestone ridges, towers, sinkholes, caves and other geological features that comprise karsts are home to a diverse range of plant species as well as insects, bats and other fauna found nowhere else on Earth.The animals that inhabit these ecosystems are important to the people who live near them, serving as pest control, pollinators and a sustainable source of income — in the case of swifts whose nests are a prized delicacy in Chinese cuisine. Karst landscapes also play an important role in groundwater management.“We must not be partial in understanding the karst ecosystem,” said Walhi’s Wahyu. “We need to take into account the environmental, economic and socio-cultural impacts of damaging these landscapes.”This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Dec. 3, 2017.Banner image: Limestone mountains in Papua. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Conservation, Ecosystems, Environment, Environmental Activism, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Karst, Mining center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

ROUND 2: Pacquiao continues offense

first_imgBenefits of township living MRT-3 files raps vs engineer who brought ammunition to station View comments ‘Marawi hero’ is new commander of Army’s 1st Infantry Division MOST READ LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Manny Pacquiao prepares to fight Keith Thurman in a welterweight title fight Saturday, July 20, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)MANILA, Philippines—Keith Thurman, who was knocked down in the first, looked to gain momentum early in the second round leading with his jab against Manny Pacquiao.Pacquiao, however, asserted his superior offense that backed Thurman off.ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: LJ Reyes, Paolo Contis celebrate 1st birthday of baby Summer Pacquiao then sneaked in a clean jab that stopped Thurman on his tracks in the final 1:30 of the round.Thurman, looking to establish his offense, continued to lead with his jab but his power punches only hit Pacquiao’s forearms.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsPacquiao came forward in the final 10 seconds and even taunted the undefeated American. Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite PLAY LIST 02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award03:05Malakanyang bilib sa Phivolcs | Chona Yu01:26Homes destroyed after Taal Volcano eruption02:48ABS-CBN franchise has ‘natural deadline,’ no need for quo warranto — Gatchalian Sons Of Apollo releases new studio album ‘MMXX’ Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? LOOK: Phil Younghusband marries longtime girlfriend Margaret Hall Steaming fissures on Taal Volcano Island spotted Duterte lambasts Catholic Church anew in curse-laden speech before Filipino Baptists Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more

Mentally ill man wandered off in Parfaite Harmonie

first_img…distressed sister seeks assistance in locating her brotherA distressed Gladys Prince is asking the public to very kindly help her locate her brother, 63-year-old Leo Prince, who last Wednesday wandered away from her Lot 977 La Parfaite Harmonie residence, on the West Bank of Demerara, and has since not been seen or heard from.She has reportedly made several attempts to locate the man, but all have provenMissing: Leo Princefutile.According to the woman, on the morning of her brother’s wandering away, she had departed for work, leaving him in the care of her daughter, a student of the University of Guyana. And when this young lady was about to offer her uncle his breakfast, she realised that he had departed the yard. Upon launching a search for her uncle, neighbours informed the girl that he had been seen leaving the yard at around 10:30hrs.Several searches since undertaken have all proven futile in locating the man. A report was accordingly filed at the La Grange Police Station, but feedback in regard to an update is yet to be offered.This publication understands that Prince – who is neither married nor has ever fathered children — was six years ago diagnosed at the Georgetown Public Hospital as “mentally ill.”Moreover, Prince’s sister has relayed to the Guyana Times that this is not the first time her brother has gone missing. She explained that her brother had, sometime in July, similarly wandered away, but had returned home early the following morning.She recalled he had told her he had forgotten his way home, and had to ask persons along the roadway to assist him.Given that 5 days have passed since her brother had last been seen, Ms Gladys Prince is quite naturally fearful for the safety of her loved one, and is apprehensive that something might have gone wrong with him… She is nevertheless hopeful for his safe return, and is urging members of the public, especially those residing within the area, to venture out in search efforts, reports of which may possibly lead to locating the missing man.Prince was last seen wearing a white jersey, black pants and a pair of slippers.Anyone with information regarding the man’s whereabouts is asked to very kindly contact his sister, Gladys Prince on 638-9748 or 638-9219, or the nearest police station.last_img read more

Arsene has ‘no regrets’ for Alexis gamble

first_imgWenger was already without almost an entire team of stars as Mikel Arteta, Francis Coquelin, Jack Wilshere, Theo Walcott, Danny Welbeck and Tomas Rosicky are currently sidelined.Koscielny was forced off early on with a hip problem, Sanchez was next to depart with a thigh injury and although Cazorla was able to complete the game despite a knee injury, Wenger described the Spain midfielder as “playing on one leg”.Wenger knows Arsenal fans are bitterly disappointed about the loss of Sanchez above all as the Chile forward has been outstanding all season.Another factor is the admission Wenger made three days before the Norwich game that he had known Sanchez was carrying a hamstring problem yet still decided not to rest him.Wenger robustly defended that decision.“Do I regret playing Sanchez? No — the players are there to play football not to be rested when the press decide they need to be rested,” said the Frenchman.“Nobody is scientifically developed enough — not even the press — to predict exactly when someone will be injured. I must say with all humility we are not in a position where we can predict.“Despite all our tests he looked all right. We checked it, when you have normal force and normal stretch usually that means there is no problem.“There are plenty of players across Europe who play in every single game.”If Cazorla has to drop out of contention then Wenger will switch Aaron Ramsey to central midfield, the Wales star’s preferred position while Koscielny’s injury opens the door for Gabriel, the Brazilian, to stake a claim for a permanent place.“Cazorla got a kick on the knee, we don’t know if it is ligaments or just a kick on the nerve but the worrying thing is that it got worse during the game,” Wenger added.“Koscielny is a kick on his hip, he can’t move at all, even now. We have to assess that.”Mesut Ozil fired Arsenal ahead in the 30th minute at Carrow Road after Sanchez seized on a poor clearance by Norwich goalkeeper John Ruddy that Gary O’Neil, the captain, could not control.Norwich equalised before half-time, however, through Lewis Grabban, who was making his first Premier League start since the opening day of the season.That was the result of disciplinary action by manager Alex Neil, who fined the forward and pushed him down the pecking order after Grabban walked out of the team hotel on the eve of a League Cup tie in September as a result of the collapse of a transfer to Bournemouh.“If it didn’t go to plan and we lost I would get criticised and he would too,” Neil said.“Credit to Lewis he showed everybody what a good player he is.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger on the sidelines during his side’s Premier League match against Norwich City at Carrow Road on November 29, 2015. PHOTO/AFPNORWICH, November 30- Arsene Wenger insisted he had no regrets over risking Alexis Sanchez in the 1-1 draw at Norwich despite the influential Chilean forward being forced off the pitch with a thigh injury.Sanchez, Santi Cazorla and Laurent Koscielny were all added to a lengthy list of long-term casualties on Sunday after a match that left Arsenal in fourth place in the Premier League table.last_img read more