Revamp for youth talent

first_imgBy Nick Creely Cricket Victoria has remodelled its state pathway program to align with the state’s Premier Cricket competition. The new competition –…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Spurs in high spirits for Arsenal’s cup visit

first_imgBy Mike CollettJust over a week ago Arsenal’s season was gaining momentum while their arch-rivals Tottenham Hotspur were still looking for their first win but they meet in the League Cup on Wednesday with that scenario completely turned on its head.Tottenham will host the first north London derby of the campaign in high spirits after three wins in eight days while Arsenal make the short trip to White Hart Lane beaten in their last two games while having three players sent off.Spurs, beaten by Chelsea in last season’s final, have beaten Sunderland and Crystal Palace in the Premier League and FK Qarabag of Azerbaijan in the Europa League and discovered a new scoring hero in Son Heung-min of South Korea who has scored three times in those games.Arsenal, who made a bright start to their campaign, lost at Dinamo Zagreb last week in the Champions League and were then beaten at Chelsea where they had two players sent off.While the League Cup, now called the Capital One Cup, is regarded as the season’s lesser prize, both Tottenham and Arsenal would find defeat an unpalatable prospect.As would Aston Villa and Birmingham City who meet in another derby – their first for five years – on Tuesday.Villa were booed off when they lost 1-0 to West Bromwich Albion on Saturday are 17th in the Premier League.Birmingham, in contrast, have made a solid start in the Championship with just one defeat in seven and are just outside the playoff positions.Villa manager Tim Sherwood told reporters at his pre-match briefing on Monday the game gives Villa the chance to kick-start their season.“It’s a great occasion and we’re looking forward to it.“It’s been a difficult start points-wise and it’s a good way to send our fans home happy because they’ve not had many of those this season.”Villa have won this competition five times but lost to Birmingham in the 1963 final, Birmingham’s last major honour until they beat Arsenal in the 2011 final.Blues manager Gary Rowett said on Monday he would be putting out his strongest possible team for the trip to Villa Park even though promotion is a priority.The third derby of the round will be at Selhurst Park where Crystal Palace play Charlton Athletic, who ground-shared with Palace for six years in the 1980s and early nineties while their own ground, The Valley, was out of commission.Palace, despite losing their last two Premier League games to Manchester City and Tottenham, start as strong favourites to see off their neighbours who are 15th in the Championship.Holders Chelsea begin the defence of their trophy at League One (third tier) Walsall.The Saddlers, forever linked with one of English soccer’s greatest upsets after beating Herbert Chapman’s Arsenal in the FA Cup in 1933, have made an excellent start to the season but a victory over Chelsea, no matter what team Jose Mourinho fields, would surpass even their famous Thirties exploits.Liverpool, who have won the League Cup a record eight times, play Carlisle United from League Two at Anfield while Manchester United host Championship promotion contenders Ipswich Town.last_img read more

‘Crunch time for biodiversity’: Farming, hunting push thousands of species toward extinction

first_imgAgriculture, Agrochemicals, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Birds, Bushmeat, Conservation, Deforestation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Food, Food Crisis, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Fragmentation, Habitat Destruction, Human Rights, Human-wildlife Conflict, Hunting, Iucn, Ivory, Mammals, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Rhinos, Sixth Mass Extinction, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by John Cannon Eighty percent of threatened animals are losing ground – literally, in the form of habitat loss – to agriculture.Up to 50 percent of threatened birds and mammals face extinction at the hands of hunters.In a study published in the journal Nature, a team of scientists explores solutions to avoid destroying the habitats of these animals, such as increasing yields in the developed world and minimizing fertilizer use. Unless we sort out how we feed the growing human population, thousands of birds and mammals will face the specter of extinction in coming decades, according to a new study published June 1 in the journal Nature.“With so many people on Earth now, and the numbers increasing by another 3 or 4 billion before we finally level off at our carrying capacity, the impact on extinctions is really great,” said lead author David Tilman.Hunting for meat, but also for body parts such as rhino horns, is pushing 40-50 percent of threatened species closer to extinction. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerTilman, an ecologist at the University of Minnesota, and his colleagues looked at the data for the world’s “threatened” birds and mammals, which they defined as the Vulnerable, Endangered or Critically Endangered animals on IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species. They also pinpointed where these animals occurred, homing in primarily on the biodiverse tropics in Southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa and South America. These regions are also experiencing – or are poised to experience – huge upticks in human populations and wealth.The team found that 80 percent of these animals owed their threatened status to the loss of their habitat for agriculture. And the killing of animals has brought the survival of 40 to 50 percent of these species into question. Often, that hunting is for meat, but the trade in body parts, such as rhinoceros horn or ivory from elephants, takes a substantial toll.But the thrust of their work wasn’t just to identify these trends, which Tilman said weren’t all that surprising.“I’m not unique among ecologists in warning that we are in the midst of an extinction event,” he said in an interview. Study after study has shown that we’re in the midst of a sixth great extinction. “My goal in starting to do these analyses was to try to find pathways toward some kind of a solution.”Without a concerted effort to stop clearing forests and other wildlife habitats to meet our nutritional needs, the trend toward extinction will continue, he said, especially with an increase 3.2 billion people to Earth’s population by 2060.“People will win out over any other organism,” Tilman said. “It’s hard for large species to live around humans because humans take up so much of their habitat and break it into little pieces.”Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) were once eradicated in the wild, but conservation efforts reestablished wild populations, and the animal is now only listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN. Photo by Charlesjsharp (Own work, from Sharp Photography, sharpphotography) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia CommonsBut changes to the way we churn out food for those additional mouths could be hugely beneficial for biodiversity, particularly in developing economies where yields are far below what they could be, the researchers argue in the paper.“A dollar invested in increasing yields in a typical African country gives $3 to 4 of more food,” Tilman said.Similarly, habitat disruptions such as water pollution could be avoided in developed countries like the United States if we can better time the applications of “inputs” such as fertilizer. If farmers cut its use by 25 percent, they would still wind up producing about the same amount of food, the authors write.They advocate the inclusion of these concerns in conservation as a way of stopping the need for habitat destruction, before it cascades into the steep declines in wild animal populations seen recently. And Tilman said turning that trend around will require a shift in how we deal with threatened species.Currently, he said, “Our actions are viewed as having no impact until we finally push a species to the brink of extinction, which then puts it on our endangered species list, at which time we start paying attention to it,” he said.California condors (Gymnogyps californianus) has regained a foothold in the wild, thanks to the Herculean efforts of conservationists and scientists, but the authors of a new study in Nature argue we don’t have the resources to do the same thing for thousands of other threatened species. Photo by Stacy from San Diego [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia CommonsScientists have managed to save animals such as the Critically Endangered California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) from extinction, and they’ve successfully reintroduced the Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) back into the wild, which is now listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN. Tilman doesn’t see those sorts of approaches as sustainable for all of the world’s threatened species, however.“Every [species] that we’ve saved has been a wonderful achievement, but it has taken immense effort,” Tilman said. “We don’t have the money to babysit … tens of thousands of species around the world.”Limited resources combined with the rates at the number of people is increasing makes the need for solutions especially urgent, he added.“It’s this last big burst of growth and human influence on the Earth, and what we do now is going to determine forever the kind of world we have,” Tilman said. “It’s crunch time for biodiversity.”CITATIONTilman, D., Clark, M., Williams, D. R., Kimmel, K., Polasky, S., & Packer, C. (2017). Future threats to biodiversity and pathways to their prevention. Nature, 546(7656), 73-81.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Banner image of an African elephant in Tanzania by John C. Cannon.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Ongoing mass extinction causing ‘biological annihilation,’ new study says

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Time is of the essence, the researchers write. They say that we have at most two to three decades to course-correct.Ceballos pointed to the African savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana) and the results of the Great Elephant Census.“We’ve lost 30 percent of the elephant population in seven years,” he said. “If the rate continues, we will lose most of them in two decades.”It’s important to realize that elephants – or any of the species or populations affected by the sixth mass extinction – won’t be the only losers, Ceballos added, if we don’t address issues like climate change and habitat loss.“What is at stake is the continuation of civilization as we know it,” he said. “There is no way we will be able to maintain human well-being at the level we have it if we don’t take this seriously.”CITATIONSCeballos, G., Ehrlich, P. R., Barnosky, A. D., García, A., Pringle, R. M., & Palmer, T. M. (2015). Accelerated modern human–induced species losses: Entering the sixth mass extinction. Science advances, 1(5), e1400253.Ceballos, G., Ehrlich, P. R., & Dirzo, R. (2017). Biological annihilation via the ongoing sixth mass extinction signaled by vertebrate population losses and declines. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1704949114FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Video courtesy of Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. Article published by John Cannon Building on research in which they showed that two species have gone extinct per year over the past century, a team of biologists analyzed the population trends for 27,600 vertebrates around the world.They found that nearly a third of the animals they looked at were on the decline.In a closer look at 177 well-studied mammals, the team found that all had lost 30 percent or more of their home ranges, and 40 percent had lost at least 80 percent of their habitat. Habitat loss, over-hunting and climate change are just a few of the human-induced changes to the Earth that biologists say are driving the planet’s “sixth mass extinction.” Research has shown that we’re losing two vertebrate species a year – a pace that’s on par with Earth’s other five extinction surges, including the most recent that snuffed out the dinosaurs about 66 million years ago.But the wave of pressure on life is rippling far beyond the growing list of endangered animals closest to the edge of extinction, according to a new study. This “biological annihilation” is in fact decimating populations of thousands of other species and potentially threatening our own way of life, a team of biologists reported online Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Habitat loss and hunting have driven some animals, such as the Critically Endangered mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) pictured here in the Democratic Republic of Congo, to the brink of extinction. Photo by John C. Cannon.“We have to be very careful not to be alarmist on the one hand,” said Gerardo Ceballos, a biologist at the National Autonomous University of Mexico and lead author of the study. “But now, the problem is so big and so overwhelming, the magnitude so huge, [that] not to mention it in this proper way would be irresponsible.”The loss of approximately 200 species a century might not seem extreme through the lens of one person’s lifespan, but it’s as much as 100 times faster than historical estimates, according to a 2015 study also led by Ceballos. He explained that under “normal circumstances,” it might have taken as many as 10,000 years for that many animals to vanish.The team also suspected that this outright loss of species might be masking a wider-ranging problem in which distinct populations are disappearing, so they decided to look beyond the animals classified as endangered by the IUCN. To get an idea of how animals’ ranges – and therefore their populations – are changing, they looked at a sample of 27,600 vertebrates, which is roughly half the species that we know exist.The researchers discovered that the populations of nearly one-third of these animals in this sample are on the decline. In terms of sheer numbers, the study’s maps show that perhaps half the number of individual animals that once inhabited the Earth with humans are gone – a loss that numbers in the billions.The Critically Endangered Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), here in Malaysia, is also struggling to hold on as much of its habitat has been taken over for human agriculture. Photo by John C. Cannon.The team also drilled down into the research on populations of 177 well-studied mammals to see how they have fared since 1900. They found every single one has lost at least 30 percent of its habitat, and around 40 percent of these mammals have lost 80 percent or more of their former ranges.The range of African lions (Panthera leo), for example, has dwindled to less than a third of what it once was, according to the study, and their numbers have dropped by 43 percent since 1993.As they dug into the results of their analysis, they found that “the story gets even more complicated,” Ceballos said.Some geographic areas did turn out to be hotspots with high rates of population losses – the tropical forests of Southeast Asia were particularly hard hit, for example. Few corners of the globe have been left untouched.“It is everywhere,” Ceballos said, “all over the place.”The African lion (Panthera leo) is listed as vulnerable by the IUCN, but its numbers have declined by 43 percent since 1993. Photo by John C. Cannon.The tropics are seeing the greatest numbers of populations eliminated, he said, which is expected because they hold the most species. But the scientists also found that temperate regions are facing losses that are proportionally just as high, if not higher.And the devastation cuts across all classes of vertebrates, Ceballos added.“This is affecting everything, from large to small, from common to rare, from mammals to amphibians.”As we continue to lose these building blocks of the ecosystems on which we depend, the authors caution that continuing on this trajectory will undoubtedly affect our own species. They write that “Earth’s capacity to support life, including human life, has been shaped by life itself.”Agriculture, the very foundation of human sustenance, depends heavily on birds, mammals and insects for pollination and pest control, said co-author and Stanford University biologist Paul Ehrlich in a video interview by the Woods Institute for the Environment.“It’s important to recognize that losing species is bad and largely irreversible,” Ehrlich said. “Losing populations and losing individuals from populations is wrecking our life-support machinery.” Amphibian Crisis, Amphibians, Animals, Apes, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biology, Birds, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Extinction, Conservation, Dinosaurs, Ecology, Ecosystem Services, Ecosystems, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Extinction And Climate Change, Global Environmental Crisis, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Mapping, Mass Extinction, Megafauna, Over-hunting, Overexploitation, Poaching, Rainforests, Reptiles, Saving Species From Extinction, Sixth Mass Extinction, Species, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

Study examines sex-specific responses of Neotropical bats to habitat fragmentation

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Bats, Conservation, Environment, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fragmentation, Forests, Fragmentation, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Mammals, Rainforests, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img While scientists have long known that males and females of some species use their habitat in different ways, the various responses to habitat destruction that are sex-specific are less well understood.Research published in the journal Biotropica this month looked at the different responses to the effects of fragmentation exhibited by male and female individuals of Seba’s Short-tailed Bat (Carollia perspicillata) and the Dwarf Little Fruit Bat (Rhinophylla pumilio), both fruit-eating bats native to the Neotropics.Researchers captured more than 2,000 bats of the target species in eight forest fragments of various sizes and nine control sites at the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project, a research forest about 80 kilometers north of Manaus in the Brazilian Amazon.The authors of the study write that their results align with those of previous research in temperate areas, where male and female bats have been found to differ in their responses to habitat degradation at the local and landscape level. In order to preserve a species from the impacts of human activities that degrade or fragment its habitat, it’s necessary to understand how the species responds to changes to the landscape it calls home. But while scientists have long known that males and females of some species use their habitat in different ways, the various responses to habitat destruction that are sex-specific are less well understood.Research published in the journal Biotropica this month looked at the different responses to the effects of fragmentation exhibited by male and female individuals of Seba’s Short-tailed Bat (Carollia perspicillata) and the Dwarf Little Fruit Bat (Rhinophylla pumilio), both fruit-eating bats native to the Neotropics.Bats provide a number of vital ecosystem services in the tropics, from seed dispersal and pollination to keeping populations of invertebrates in check. If the gender composition of a particular bat population becomes too heavily biased towards one sex, that can have obvious implications for the species’ chances of survival. But, according to Ricardo Rocha, “up-to-now no study had investigated sex-specific responses, despite their overwhelming importance for the dynamics and long-term persistence of natural communities.” Rocha led the Biotropica study together with his colleague at the University of Lisbon’s Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes, Diogo Ferreira. Rocha and Ferreira expected to find divergent response patterns to habitat fragmentation in male and female bats because of their differing energetic needs. “Females of the two species that we studied have their period of highest reproductive activity in the dry season,” Ferreira said in a statement. “When females are pregnant or lactating, their responses to landscape features will be different because females will be more dependent on fruit availability or will not be able to travel as far as males to forage.”For the study, the researchers captured more than 2,000 bats of the target species in eight forest fragments of various sizes and nine control sites at the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project, a research forest about 80 kilometers north of Manaus in the Brazilian Amazon. They sampled both male and female bats in the dry and wet seasons in a variety of habitats, including continuous primary forest, fragment interiors, forest edges, and secondary forest.The authors of the study write that their results align with those of previous research in temperate areas, where male and female bats have been found to differ in their responses to habitat degradation at the local and landscape level.Rhinophylla pumilio. Photo © Adrià López-Baucells.Capture rates of C. perspicillata, for instance, were higher for females than males during the dry season at edges and secondary forest matrix sites, as well as in continuous forest and fragment interiors, albeit to a lesser extent. The researchers believe this is because the dry season is the peak reproductive period for the species, and the females are therefore seeking out the most resource-rich areas to make foraging for a meal easier — their favorite food, it turns out, happens to be fruit from tree species that flourish in newly created forest gaps, which is why females were so much more abundant than males on the edges of forest fragments. The capture rate of R. pumilio females was also higher during the dry season.During the wet season, both males and females demonstrated strong responses to local habitat features, which the authors suggest is due to the fact that neither sex has to travel long distances to find food during the wet season, making localized habitat disturbance a more critical issue.“Our results suggest that, at least for some species, male and female bats respond to fragmentation in different ways and that responses to local- and landscape-scale attributes are sex- and season-specific,” they write in the study.Christoph Meyer, a lecturer in Global Ecology and Conservation at the UK’s University of Salford and senior author of the Biotropica study, adds: “Our study suggests yet another level of complexity in terms of how tropical bats respond to landscape-scale changes in their environment.”Research has consistently shown habitat fragmentation to be one of the chief threats to wildlife. A 2016 study, for instance, found that road building, selective logging, wildfires, and other man-made disturbances in the Brazilian state of Pará have caused as much biodiversity loss as clearing 92,000 to 139,000 square kilometers (about 35,500 to 53,700 square miles) of pristine forest — which is more than the total area of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon between 2006 and 2015. (If you find it easier to digest this kind of data visually, don’t miss the “data visualization project” focused on this study’s findings.)With the world’s human population increasing and per capita consumption in the developing world rising, the rate of tropical forest fragmentation is expected to accelerate in the coming decades, as well. Rocha noted that this makes a deeper understanding of species’ responses to fragmentation all the more critical.“In this context, it is important to know if males and females respond differently, especially when you consider that modifications in population structure, i.e. sex ratio, can act to diminish or magnify the pervasive impacts of forest loss and habitat fragmentation,” he said.Carollia perspicillata. Photo © Oriol Massana & Adrià López.CITATIONBarlow, J., Lennox, G. D., Ferreira, J., Berenguer, E., Lees, A. C., Mac Nally, R., … & Parry, L. (2016). Anthropogenic disturbance in tropical forests can double biodiversity loss from deforestation. Nature, 535(7610), 144-147. doi:10.1038/nature18326Rocha, R., Ferreira, D. F., López‐Baucells, A., Farneda, F. Z., Carreiras, J., Palmeirim, J. M., & Meyer, C. F. (2017). Does sex matter? Gender‐specific responses to forest fragmentation in Neotropical bats. Biotropica. doi:10.1111/btp.12474Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Does social forestry always decrease deforestation and poverty? (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler Many governmental and non-governmental organizations see community forestry in Indonesia as a new approach to reducing environmental degradation and increasing social welfare. Despite a decade of experimentation with the concept, very little is known, however, about actual impacts.Studies by the Monitoring and Evaluation of Social Forestry program (MEPS) reveal that Village Forest (Hutan Desa) areas reduce deforestation in forests allocated for watershed protection and limited timber extractionIn forest allocated to normal timber production and conversion, Hutan Desa areas, however, have higher deforestation than comparable forests not managed by communities. Community forestry can achieve positive outcomes, but not everywhere. The government needs to take this insight on board to help in allocating licenses and investments for this scheme.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author. Despite decades of hard environmental battle against deforestation, tropical forest losses continue unabated. Forests are cut down to make way for cattle-grazing land, oil palm plantations or other non-forests uses. Often, governments justify this deforestation by pointing to the prospective economic and social benefits that are generated when a natural forest is turned into a plantation or other agricultural use.While deforestation continues in many parts of the world, there is, at the same time, a growing realization that forests are actually quite important for many rural communities. For example, 66 percent of Indonesia’s poor live in or around forest, and these forests provide vital goods and services to those communities, including flood prevention, clean water, fish, medicinal plants, bushmeat and many others.The tricky question for governments is where the balance lies. How much forest needs to be kept to maintain traditional forest livelihoods and other services derived from natural systems, and how much forest could be cut down to provide land for agriculture-based development? Which of these two options provides the best overall outcome in terms of economic development, increasing social welfare and protecting the environment? Unfortunately, with the true costs and benefits of deforestation unknown, such crucial questions remain largely ignored, and governments generally remain supportive of the well-worn path of deforestation.Figure 1. Degraded peat swamp area in West Kalimantan where currently very little agricultural production is possible because of high fire risk, low soil fertility, frequent flooding, and remoteness of the area. When do the benefits of deforestation exceed the costs? Was this area worth more when still forested, and, if so, to whom?Community forest management is currently often championed as a way to benefit both local livelihoods and forest conservation. This is especially relevant in Indonesia, which still has some of the highest deforestation rates in the world, but is also increasingly recognizing community forest rights.A 2012 decision of Indonesia’s Constitutional Court and subsequent ministerial regulations in late 2014, oblige local governments to reallocate 12.7 million hectares of state forest to forest-dependent communities. To put this in perspective, this equals about 7 percent of the total land area of Indonesia, which makes it one of the largest social and environmental experiments in recent history.Two major assumptions underlie this Indonesian experiment. The first assumption is that integrating communities into forest management will increase their social welfare. The second assumption is that communities are better land managers than the industrial operators that would otherwise log or clear forests. Both assumptions combined result in the untested premise that community-managed forests in Indonesia will have lower deforestation rates than forests under government or company management.Figure 3. The estimated mean avoided deforestation rates (ha/km2) contributed by Hutan Desa in Sumatra and Kalimantan every year between 2012 and 2016 across different land use histories (protection HL, limited production HPT, and permanent and convertible production HPTK).To assist the Indonesian government in its decision-making, these assumptions are currently being tested through the Monitoring and Evaluation of Social Forestry program — Monitoring dan Evaluasi Perhutanan Sosial (MEPS). This program is funded by the UK-based Darwin Initiative and the Woodspring Trust, and implemented by a consortium of organizations, including the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology at the University of Kent, Flora and Fauna International (FFI), The University of Queensland, the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), and Borneo Futures.The initial MEPS findings give food for thought. A recent paper published in the journal Global Environmental Change looked into the extent to which deforestation has been avoided as a result of Indonesia’s community forestry scheme, Hutan Desa (Village Forest).The study found that Hutan Desa management has successfully achieved avoided deforestation overall, but performance varied substantially between study sites and between years (see figure below). Hutan Desa allocated on watershed protection forest or limited production forest typically avoided between 0.6 and 1.5 ha/km2 of deforestation compared to non-Hutan Desa sites with similar characteristics, with performance in different years being relatively constant. Conversely, Hutan Desa granted on permanent or convertible production forest did not always reduce deforestation, especially during very dry years when extensive areas of degraded forest and peatland burned. Overall, Hutan Desa on peat land performed poorly, because of the associated fire risk.The study further indicated that limited management capacity at the village level underlies some of this underperformance in Hutan Desa, and that capacity building is a crucial component of successful community forest management. It seems that blanket deployment of community forestry programs is unlikely to lead to improved outcomes across the board, and therefore careful evaluation of this new policy is called for.Results of these studies were recently presented to and discussed with local governments in the Ketapang and Hulu Kapuas Districts in West Kalimantan. Government representatives were surprised to see that the performance of village forest could be monitored remotely through study of satellite imagery. So far, the MEPS program is piloting its approaches in two districts and government representatives have requested a rapid scaling-up of the program to cover larger parts of Indonesia.Figure 2. A village forest (Hutan Desa) in West Kalimantan. The sign says: “Reminder. Based on the Ministerial Decision SK 493/Menhut-11/2011, the Manjau village forest in de Laman Satong village is declared to have an area of 1,070 ha. It is prohibited to fell trees, burn the forest, damage the village forest, or hunt protected species”.To complement the landscape-scale analysis, the MEPS team is currently also looking at social dynamics at the site-scale to investigate the role of different actors in the process of decision-making and management of Hutan Desa and how these internal and external networks influence the environmental and social performance of Hutan Desa.Finally, the same MEPS program is also assessing the impacts of Hutan Desa development on various aspects of social welfare and a range of poverty indicators. Preliminary analysis indicates that Hutan Desa approaches do not always achieve positive outcomes for social welfare. Such studies provide valuable insights as to where and when community forest management programs are most likely to achieve their environmental and social objectives.The tricky questions about the relative costs and benefits of alternative land uses can only be answered through robust evaluation of land use policy and on-ground outcomes. This takes time, but it ultimately facilitates better decision-making and prevents adverse outcomes for the most marginalized people in Indonesia.center_img Commentary, Community Forests, Conservation, Deforestation, Editorials, Forests, Indigenous Communities, Land Rights, Peatlands, Rainforests last_img read more

The wily ways of a Myanmar-China border town

first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker One of many towns of the Myanmar-China border, Bhamo, Myanmar has long been a hub for illegal trade with China, including illegally logged charcoal currently sold.Most of the charcoal is bound overland for brisk business with China, yet Bhamo still finds itself without enough money coming in.Bhamo has a long history of diversifying its products and services to survive and get ahead.This glimpse at Bhamo is part of a series on illegal logging in Myanmar published this week by Mongabay. More reporting, photography, and a short docu-video in this series can be found at Mongabay.com. BHAMO, Myanmar – Bhamo is a small, busy town set on the bank of the Irrawaddy River in Myanmar’s Kachin state. Its location – at the juncture between the river and China – has made it an essential stop for Myanmar’s bustling illegal charcoal trade, one more commodity to transit through the town.In one of Bhamo’s busy streets, a furniture store sells wardrobes, displays for Buddha statues and tables. It’s one of the few businesses that cater to local customers, but it has also been affected by Bhamo’s trade.The shop’s manager, a woman in her 30s – who, her father interjects, has a degree in economics – explains that these days it’s a bit hard to find wood to make furniture. Indeed, Bhamo used to be a hub for the teak trade until a few years ago, and because of the intensive timber export, the source of timber has dried up.The​ ​owner​ ​of​ ​a​ ​local​ ​furniture​ ​store​ ​in​ ​Bhamo​ ​poses​ ​for​ ​a​ ​portrait.​ ​She​ ​says​ ​it’s​ ​hard​ ​to find​ ​wood​ ​to​ ​make​ ​furniture​ ​now​ ​that​ ​the​ ​timber​ ​trade​ ​to​ ​China​ ​has​ ​dried​ ​up. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.The manager adds that her clients are local people and the shop doesn’t export to China because they don’t have business connections there.Not far from there, several stories up at the Friendship Hotel in Bhamo, is a typical Chinese-style hotel with a flashing neon sign that welcomes guest in a multitude of languages. In the lobby, the owner explains that his best business was about six years ago – the heydays of logging.At that time, he says, a ton of rosewood cost up to $515 in Bhamo, and you could sell it on the Chinese side for $22,000, a nice profit even after bribes and transport were deducted. But since 2014, the government cracked down on the illegal export of logs and so business has quieted down.Bhamo, Myanmar near the Chinese border. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.Turning off the tap of timber wealth has affected most businesses in town.Despite this, the hotel owner says, he still has paying customers. Most of them are the staff of NGOs who come to work in the camps where people escape the nearby conflicts between the national army and the Kachin Independence Army (KIA). The hotel is several stories high, with a dining hall at the top.“I want Bhamo to be developed but not like Mandalay and Yangon,” he said, explaining that that the town used to be quiet and now he has to wade through traffic to get to his home, which he does not like.Bhamo has changed a lot over the years.It was founded as the capital of an independent Shan State that formed alliances with other kingdoms nearby. From the late 1600s, it was occupied by Burma, and then freed, and conquered again, until officers of the British Empire were posted in the town in 1869.Forest covered much of the district, and the colonial state used the town as a trading post for timber, with about 110,000 logs exported from the district between 1890-1902 according to colonial records.Construction​ ​workers​ ​on​ ​the​ ​site​ ​of​ ​a​ ​new​ ​Chinese-funded​ ​hotel​ ​in​ ​Bhamo,​ ​in​ ​northern Myanmar. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.By then, it was already a nexus of trade with China, including for smuggled opium. During the Second World War, Bhamo became one of the stops on the Lado/Stilwell Road, built by the Americans to bring supplies from India to assist China in its fight against Japan. Nevertheless, the road never brought the strategic advantage that it had been built for, and it fell into disrepair soon after the end of the war.Yet Bhamo has maintained its historical position as a trading post to China. The hotel owner explains that when he started the building’s construction in 1993, this was the only tall structure in town and it did not have electricity without a generator.At that time, the road to China was officially closed because of the war with the KIA, and only the people with the connections to the armed group could use it.Workers​ ​offload​ ​rice​ ​from​ ​a​ ​boat​ ​in​ ​the​ ​town​ ​of​ ​Bhamo.​ ​Situated​ ​on​ ​the​ ​Irrawaddy​ ​River, Bhamo​ ​is​ ​a​ ​trade​ ​hub​ ​between​ ​China​ ​and​ ​the​ ​rest​ ​of​ ​Myanmar. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.Today, the road is very much open for trade with a busy traffic of corn and charcoal going to China while Myanmar imports electronics and other consumption goods. Those are brought as far as Mandalay, a day’s boat ride downstream.In the port, just next to the water, a wide shop sells all kinds of electronics and cell phones in elegant white displays. The shop owner started his business ten years ago, but initially they showed movies to a crowd. Now, everyone has DVD players and so they had to adapt.His daughter explains that their main customers come from the neighboring villages to buy cheap phones. Right now, business is slow. She’s not sure why, “maybe the gold mines didn’t make money.” She adds that in Kachin, there is only logging and mining as good business, and these businesses don’t operate well, so it’s harder.The​ ​owner​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Friendship​ ​Hotel​ ​poses​ ​for​ ​a​ ​photo​ ​on​ ​the​ ​balcony​ ​of​ ​one​ ​of​ ​its​ ​rooms. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.According to her, the port is busier now than 10 years ago. At that time, they mostly carried gold mining equipment from Mandalay, such as engines, generators, pump and pipes. Today, the boats carry carry corn and rice that will be sold in China. This food trade only picked up three years ago, she says.Just above the shop in the port’s office, several men mull around a desk. It’s hard to know who works there and who is just enjoying the afternoon shade. One person identifies himself as the port’s official. He explains that there are more and more passenger boats.In 2011, only 72 boats were registered, he says while looking in a large notebook, then more each year. I ask him about 2015, and he says 150, before writing the number in his notebook next to the others.As for the exact number of boats transiting through the port, it is hard to know exactly what goods pass through Bhamo. Much of it is not recorded, and perhaps the most valuable products are smuggled, like charcoal and timber or opium before it.What is clear, however, is that Bhamo’s wealth has been intimately connected to the fluctuations of the trade that passes through it.Banner image: A temple at nightfall in Bhamo. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.Emmanuel Freudenthal is an investigative reporter whose work has appeared internationally and he can be found on Twitter at @EmmanuelFreuden. Nathan Siegel is a photographer and videographer focusing on international environmental issues. He can be found on Instagram at @npsiegel.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Forests, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Illegal Trade, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Ellen Receives New UNMEER Head

first_imgPresident Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has met with the new Special Representative of the United Nations (UN) Secretary General and Head of the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER), Mr. Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed.The Liberian President received Mr. Ahmed and his delegation at her Foreign Ministry office during a courtesy call on Tuesday, January 6, 2015,  where brief acquaintance pleasantries were exchanged.   Mr. Ahmed, a Mauritanian, replaces Mr. Anthony Banbury. Special Representative Banbury was the first envoy appointed by UN0 Secretary Ban Ki-Moon during the heat of the Ebola crisis in the sub-region. He initially noted that his mandate was to eradicate the virus from the sub-region. Mr. Banbury’s tour of duty ended over the weekend, thereby ushering in the new envoy.President Sirleaf welcomed the new Head of UMEER to Liberia and described the work of his predecessor as excellent and very supportive of the country’s fight to contain the deadly ebola virus disease.“Your predecessor effectively spearheaded the operations of UMEER with huge progress. Even though the country still has a lot to be done with regards to Ebola, much was achieved with the assistance and cooperation of UNMEER,” President Sirleaf indicated.She pledged her government’s support to the transitional process in UNMEER and emphasized the need for improved and strengthened regional collaboration and cooperation in the continued fight against the further spread of the deadly Ebola virus disease.She named exchange of information, experiences and best practices as important elements required to enhance regional cooperation and collaboration in the Ebola fight, thereby acknowledging that some level of regional collaboration is taking place, but still below the level it ought to be and stressed that the regional dimension of the virus makes it difficult for progress to be made in one country without the corresponding progress in the others.The new UNMEER Head, Cheikh Ahmed, expressed appreciation for the leadership and commitment of the Liberian government, which he considers the main factor responsible for the level of progress made in Liberia’s fight against the further spread of the Ebola virus disease.He pointed out that the mechanism for coordination may not be perfect but has impacted the Ebola fight in Liberia and the region very efficiently.Mr. Ahmed indicated that UNMEER will also focus on helping government reactivate the educational system and declared the mission’s support to the back to school effort. He,  however, advised that appropriate measures and processes be put into place to protect both the students and staff as Ebola is still active in Liberia.Mr. Ahmed was accompanied by the Secretary General’s  Special Representative of the UN Mission in Liberia, Karin Landgren; UN Ebola Envoy, David Nabarro; and Mr. Peter Graff; while Health Minister, Dr. Walter Gwenigale; Minister of State Without Portfolio, Mr. Sylvester Grigsby; and Dr. Emmanuel Dolo, were also in attendance.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Gardena friends remember man few knew as homeless

first_imgBy Larry Altman STAFF WRITER Bill Cunha surprised a few people after his death. Few knew that the 62-year-old man who performed odd jobs at the Faith Christian Center in Gardena, and who stopped every day to check on his storage unit, was homeless. In 1977, Cunha was leaning against the door of a four-wheel-drive van. Someone opened the door, causing him to lose his balance and fall. Cunha hit his head on the ground. “He was in a coma for a long time,” said his sister, Sheila Cunha. “He had to learn how to walk and talk. He was like an infant when he came home from the hospital.” Cunha went back to his construction job, but his difficulties began about 10 years after the accident. He suffered epileptic seizures. “You couldn’t understand how he talked,” his sister said. “It was hard for him to communicate after the seizures.” He continued to live with his mother until 1996, when she required special treatment for her emphysema and subsequently died. His sister said that’s when he went downhill. During the past 10 years, he lived in a room at a trailer park, in a room behind a dentist’s office, and in a room at the Gardena Valley News, where he delivered papers and performed other little tasks. He worked his own gardening business and performed odd jobs. “He functioned well and he did his best with his circumstances,” said longtime friend Rosalie Schjeldahl. “He stayed stable as long as he could.” Schjeldahl, who dated Cunha in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and her husband used to take food to him. Ultimately, Cunha ended up living in his blue pickup. He parked during the day in Alondra Park and near the church at night. Every day, Cunha ate breakfast at Albertita’s Mexican Food in Gardena, and checked on his belongings stored at Extra Space Storage, placing the morning newspaper in front of manager Tony McClendon’s office. “He loved to talk and had so much information,” McClendon said. “He would give me ideas on how to cook, how to survive out there. In his passing, I honestly did not know Bill was homeless.” McClendon said Cunha was part of his “Extra Space family.” Cunha arrived every day like clockwork, bringing recyclables to his second-floor unit, which he kept organized and clean. He swept the hallway in front of it. “He would tell me about this Alondra Park,” McClendon said. “I never met anyone who was so knowledgeable about every inch of that park. He would talk about where he’s been and things that he’s done and people he’s dealt with. He was an all-around nice, cheerful guy.” Cunha’s 5-foot-by-10-foot unit was filled with boxes containing clippings torn from the Daily Breeze. He read the newspaper from cover to cover every day, and was interested in a variety of topics, including gardening, medical marijuana and military activities. Among the articles was a 2002 story about his sister, Pamela Cunha, whose body was found in the Dominguez Channel in Carson. Pamela Cunha, 47, who lived with friends, suffered from manic depression, alcoholism and drug abuse. Her death was never solved. Over the last few years, Cunha spent his days watching over Purnell’s preschool, keeping transients away. He worked in the church’s garden, keeping the flower beds free of weeds. Teacher’s aide Linda Montes called him a “a real good friend.” “He just seemed like such a really nice person that was really respectable,” Montes said. “He was just like a part of Gardena. You just knew who Bill was. He always waved his hand from afar. If you were way across the street, he still had that arm waving.” Everyone knew something was wrong Aug. 12, when Cunha failed to show up at the school and storage facility. McClendon noticed his newspaper was not outside his door. Cunha was collecting cans at 6:45 a.m. when another motorist traveling at about 80 mph blew through a red light at Broadway and Alondra Boulevard in Carson. The driver plowed into Cunha’s blue truck. It burst into flames, killing Cunha, sheriff’s deputy Jon Tedder said. The other motorist ran, leaving behind his car and dropping his cellular telephone on the ground. The evidence made it easy for detectives to investigate the case. They identified the driver, but have not arrested him as they continue to build their case. Word spread quickly about Cunha’s death. Schjeldahl organized the memorial service and is expecting a large crowd. Sheila Cunha, who had urged her brother to come to Bakersfield to live, said the response has been awesome. She had no idea how many people knew her brother. “I’ve gotten so many phone calls,” she said. “He made an impact on that town.” larry.altman@dailybreeze.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! He lived in his blue pickup truck, driving around the Gardena area, parking and sleeping in Alondra Park and its surrounding neighborhoods. “He showed no signs of being homeless. I had no idea,” said Kim Purnell, administrator at the church school. “I was shocked. He did so much for so many people. It never showed.” Today, friends will gather under a big tree in the park to remember Cunha, who died Aug. 12 when a hit-and-run driver slammed into his truck, setting it ablaze. “He was my friend,” Purnell said. “I am going to pay my respects. I have to be there.” Cunha grew up in Gardena, graduating from Gardena High School in 1964. He served in the U.S. Army, worked construction and helped his mother raise his three sisters after his father died. last_img read more

Hart High football squad is ready to line ’em up

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – Fall football practice begins Wednesday for most high schools, and it will be interesting to see how Hart High’s offensive line develops – a vital issue for the Indians, who for obvious reasons always put a high priority on pass protection. Derek Bickford, a promising junior who is among the few experienced returnees, should expect a strong season, along with Jordan Rojas and converted linebacker Patrick Larrimore. “I’ve been pleasantly surprised,” said coach Mike Herrington, a former Hart lineman himself in the 1970s before playing at College of the Canyons and Cal State Northridge. “A lot of people thought the line might be a weakness because we lost so many players, but this group is fairly athletic. They might not be as big as last year but they’re athletic.” Hart, which lost to Canyon in the Southern Section Div. II final in December, hasn’t won a title since 2003 – the program’s first two-year dry spell since 1997. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREFrumpy Middle-aged Mom: My realistic 2020 New Year’s resolutions. Some involve doughnuts.Another key issue will be the continued development of Delano Howell, who is among Hart’s most promising running backs ever but is coming off a subpar sophomore season, mainly because of a recurring injury. There are those who believe Howell, who when healthy combines blinding speed with Ted Iacenda-style power, is every bit as good as Foothill League rivals Shane Vereen of Valencia and J.J. DiLuigi of Canyon. But Howell must put up the numbers to prove it. “I think he will. I think Delano will have a breakout season,” Herrington said. And perhaps the most important issue of all at Hart will be chemistry. Off-field problems and discipline cases were a hassle last year, and there aren’t many teams more eager to embrace a new season than the Indians. “There are still some question marks, but I like the camaraderie of this team,” Herrington said. At any rate, here are some more pressing football issues we couldn’t get around to in Tuesday’s column: Can Saugus finally pull even with local powers Canyon, Hart and Valencia by making the playoffs? Because of revamped Southern Section playoff divisions, only three Foothill League teams will qualify for the postseason in the new Northern Division, and it’s going to take quite a turnaround for Saugus (4-7) – which hasn’t won a playoff game since 1999 – to nudge past one of the Big Three. It was not a particularly successful summer for Saugus in terms of summer-league victories, but the heart of the team is its offensive line and, perhaps, sophomore running back Ryan Zirbel. The plan is for Saugus to show more once things get physical. Hey, Saugus, if not this year, then when? Can struggling Golden Valley make a name for itself in its first year in the Foothill League? This won’t be easy. The Grizzlies (2-8) didn’t look so hot last year against a mostly weak freelance schedule, and there’s a big difference between schools like Hart and Canyon compared with Salesian of Los Angeles and St. Genevieve of Panorama City – the two unhonored opponents Golden Valley defeated last year. Perhaps Golden Valley will be fired up under new coach Steve Pinkston. Plus, there is a more even slate because the third-year school has seniors for the first time. The good news is: There’s nowhere to go but up. What about West Ranch? Oh, yes, the little team that could. After dipping its toes into varsity competition with three games last year (the rest JV), West Ranch plays a full freelance schedule before joining the Foothill League in 2007. West Ranch doesn’t have seniors yet, which puts the program in the same boat as last year’s Golden Valley team. Circle Nov. 9 on your calendar. That’s when West Ranch plays Golden Valley in a Thursday season finale. Gerry Gittelson’s column appears in the Daily News three times a week. gerry.gittelson@dailynews.com (661) 257-5218160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more