Suspicious car at Tynong North

first_imgBy Jessica Anstice Pakenham police were called to a suspicious car in Tynong north where they located a small quantity of meth about…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Galway and Tipperary Senior Hurling Teams Named For All-Ireland Semi-Final

first_imgThe Galway Senior Hurling Team to play Tipperary in Sunday’s All Ireland Semi Final has been named. The team shows one change from the side that started the Leinster Final with Cathal Mannion returning from injury to take his place in attack with Jason Flynn losing out. Elsewhere, the team is the same with Daithi Burke at full back and Gearoid McInerney at centre back. Joe Canning starts at centre forward, while Niall Burke, Joseph Cooney and Conor Cooney all start in the forward division. 1        Colm Callanan 2        Adrian Tuohy3        Daithi Burke4        John Hanbury5        Padraig Mannion6        Gearoid McInerney7        Aidan Harte8        Johnny Coen9        David Burke (Capt)10      Cathal Mannion11      Joe Canning12      Joseph Cooney13      Conor Whelan14      Niall Burke15      Conor CooneyAs Tipperary prepare to meet Galway for the third year in a row at the semi-final stage of the championship, manager Michael Ryan and his fellow selectors have chosen fourteen of last year’s All-Ireland winning team to start in defence of their title against the Tribesmen on Sunday. It means a return for Darren Gleeson in goal and Michael Cahill at left corner back with James Barry reverting to his customary full back position.The Tipperary starting 15 lines out as follows;1 Darren Gleeson2 Donagh Maher3 James Barry4 Michael Cahill5 Seamus Kennedy6 Ronan Maher7 Padraic Maher (Capt)8 Brendan Maher9 Michael Breen10 Dan McCormack11 Patrick Maher12 Noel McGrath13 John O’Dwyer14 Seamus Callanan15 John McGrathprint WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img read more

Drylands greener with forests than previously thought

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon The new study, published Thursday in the journal Science, increases global forest cover estimates by 9 percent.Using very high resolution imagery, the team calculated that dryland forest cover was 40 to 47 percent higher above current totals.The researchers calculate that 1.1 million hectares (4,247 square miles) of forest covers the Earth’s drylands. New research has, for the first time, made use of very high resolution images of Earth’s drylands, revealing that they hold a much larger portion of the world’s forests than previously thought.Employing a new method only possible because of the fine-grained quality of these images and the frequency at which they were taken, a team of scientists from 15 different institutions has found 467 million hectares (1.8 million square miles) of dryland forests that has escaped our notice until now. The findings, reported Thursday in the journal Science, notch up estimates of the world’s forest cover by 9 percent or more – high enough to impact global carbon budgets and open new doors to conservation in arid regions.Jean-François Bastin, a remote sensing ecologist at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations in Rome and the lead author of the study, said the team was “surprised and stunned” to see the bump in dryland forest cover from their assessment. Globally, 1,079 million hectares (4.166 million square miles) of forest covers this arid biome – from  40 to 47 percent above previous estimates.Figure 1 from Bastin et al., 2017, shows the extent of Earth’s drylands and forest coverage.These sections of the Earth, where more water is lost to evaporation and transpiration by plants than falls as precipitation, account for roughly 41 percent of land on Earth. They stretch from the tropics to the upper latitudes of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. But ecologists have often paid more attention to tropical rainforests or boreal forests because they cover larger areas than dryland forests.“When you have big decisions and we are trying to think about a way to do forest restoration, to do forest conservation, basically drylands were always put to the side,” Bastin said in a Skype interview.It turns out, however, that the new calculations of dryland forest area put them in the same range as tropical forest area. Tropical forests covered 1,156 million hectares (4.463 million square miles) in 2000.Part of the reason for the underestimation of dryland forests in earlier studies has to do with methodology. The “classical” approach for quantifying forest cover relies on vegetation “signals” from a few selected points that indicate the presence of forest. Then, scientists use models to estimate how much land area is forest.This approach works well for more uniform areas of forest, but with drylands, assessments until now have been understood to be “limited,” Bastin said.A coolabah (Eucalyptus victrix) forest in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Photo and caption by TERN AusplotsFor this study, the team examined 0.5-hectare sample plots – 213,795 of them, to be exact – and counted individual trees in the canopy using images with resolutions of 1 meter (about 39 inches) or less. That allowed them to include sections of forest that had previously slipped past the model-based approach.In addition to forest and tree cover, the researchers assessed 70 different attributes, including the locations of roads, settlements and croplands.“The most striking information that we had was about the difference in terms of dryland forest cover,” Bastin said. Being able to tease apart areas that were true forest from areas that just appeared to be forests at lower resolutions – such as agroforestry plots, for example – allowed the team to produce an even more accurate tabulation of global forest cover.The data detailing the other attributes will no doubt be useful in future research, he added, especially since the their findings demonstrate the importance of forests found in drier parts of the world.A blackbox (Euculayptus largiflorens) forest in the Murraylands of South Australia. Photo and caption by TERN Ausplots“There is a lot to do in those regions, and we should be more focused about what is happening there,” Bastin said. For example, “What is their role … for global carbon cycling?”The new estimate of dryland forest cover could mean that global carbon stocks are 20 percent greater than we thought they were.The authors also write that a more prominent role for dryland forests could lead to solutions “to mitigate climate change, combat desertification, and support the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services that underpin human livelihoods.” Tropical dry forest was recently found to be the most endangered biome on the planet.“These are very arid regions,” Bastin said. “You don’t have a lot of competition for the lands.” He pointed to efforts such as the Great Green Wall aimed at creating a 7,000-kilometer (4,350-mile) barrier of vegetation against drought and desertification across the African Sahel, home to some of the world’s poorest countries.“It could be a win-win solution for many people.”Baobabs near Morondava, Madagascar. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerA baobab (Adansonia spp.) forest in Senegal during the dry season. Photo and caption by FAO/FaiduttiFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.CITATIONBastin, J., Berrahmouni, N., Grainger, A., Maniatis, D., Mollicone, D., Moore, R., … Mamane, B. (2017). The extent of forest in dryland biomes, Science, 356(6338), 635–638. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Adaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Agroforestry, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Hotspots, Carbon Conservation, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Forests, Conservation, Conservation And Poverty, Deforestation, Deserts, Drought, Dry Forests, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forests, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery last_img read more

The charcoal hunters

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Investigative reporter Emmanuel Freudenthal and photographer and videographer Nathan Siegel take you behind the scenes of their reporting.The report is one of a multi-part series on illegal logging in Myanmar, published this week by Mongabay.More reporting, photography, and a short docu-video in this series can be found at Mongabay.com. KATHA, Myanmar – The train rocked from side to side like a sketchy funhouse. It was the rainy season in northern Myanmar and we had been traveling for nearly a week. For the next couple of weeks, we would follow the colossal Irrawaddy River upstream until it bent to lick the Chinese border. We had come to document Myanmar’s export of timber to China, an illegal trade that has been depleting the country’s forests over decades.Our team comprised the usual journalism trinity: a fixer-translator, Mary*; photographer Nathan; and a writer, Emmanuel. Our first target was the forest near Katha, a quiet town bordering the Irrawaddy, where we thought it would be easy to find loggers and then follow the logs to China.Searching for loggersAfter a night in Katha, early in the morning, we set out enthusiastically on a day trip to the forest. It’s just a little bit farther, our guide said, but it seemed like we never got any closer. After shaking across bumpy roads for hours on tiny motorbikes, breaking down twice, and driving over a suicidal chicken (RIP), we were exhausted, but we had finally made it to the forest!Charcoal near Katha, Myanmar. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.A local contact of our fixer introduced us to a logger whom we followed to his forest work site. Surrounded by trees, we chatted with him, feet in ensconced in mud, hands swatting mosquitoes and skin sweating. Our first interviewee, and the only person around, turned out to be more of a heroin addict and small-time laborer than the chainsaw-wielding serial logger we had hoped for.Nevertheless, he told us something crucial: virtually nobody logs during the monsoon season. You can see why, he said, motioning to the swarms of mosquitoes around us. Somehow none of the dozen researchers and fixers we’d talked to before our trip had mentioned that logging comes to halt with the seasonal rains.The story we had spent months researching and planning had just gotten severely and literally bogged down. With night quickly falling, we scooped up what remained of our crushed spirits and headed back to Katha. The headlight of the bike rented by Emmanuel and Mary was broken, so they used the flashlight app on  a smartphone to find their way back to the hotel through the freezing night.“Our bad luck is all because you murdered that chicken,” Nathan said to Emmanuel at one point.Our spirits had hit rock bottom.We were just about to leave Katha in anger to try our luck elsewhere. But the next day, we talked to a local farmer and NGO member who would set our journey on a new direction.A new focusAs the farmer smiled and quietly puffed on a cigarette (all environmentalists smoke, he jokingly explained), he told us that charcoal was exported from Myanmar to China to produce metal. This sounded odd, but promising. Glancing at each other, we tried to contain our excitement. Was this the break we were looking for? Or another dead end?Emmanuel, a calming and even force on the trip, seemed to allow himself a bit of hope.“I forgot how much reporting is like a rollercoaster,” he said. Hopefully we would start climbing to something promising – and exit before the hair-raising fall that inevitably follows.A local woman pulls charcoal from an earth kiln near Katha, a town in the Sagaing region of Myanmar. Producers in the area around Katha are often farmers who make charcoal to supplement their income. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.That night after Nathan made the dubious claim that the soup noodles were “the best we’ve had so far,” we furiously searched the internet for any mentions of this charcoal trade. Nothing turned up apart from a brief paragraph in a December 2014 Forest Trends report which stated that “charcoal now represents 32 percent of Myanmar’s total timber product exports to China.” And that this “is likely prohibited by Myanmar law.”Emmanuel noted he wasn’t sure whether we had set upon a great story or a wild goose chase.The following week, we met with dozens of charcoal producers and traders scattered along the riverbank near Katha. All the producers were small-scale farmers who said they sought to supplement their income by smoking wood in large kilns in their backyard. Many had logged teak and other valuable hardwood species in years past, but greater restrictions and the exhaustion of these trees made the business unviable.Instead, villagers were cutting the trees that remained after companies had cleared the forests for huge profits. That confirmed that the charcoal production is real. But does it go to China’s factories, or just feed local cooking stoves?We had to follow the charcoal trail. We became obsessed with spotting the pale green bags filled with those lumpy chunks of charred wood.The businessSeveral traders near Katha explained that they load the bags on large boats that then fight the current of the mighty Irrawaddy River by going upstream to a town called Bhamo, near the Chinese border. From there, it seemed logical to guess that the charcoal is then loaded onto trucks and smuggled into China.Following these bags to China was not straightforward because it crossed areas where an armed conflict had been simmering since the 1960s, pitting the Kachin ethnic group against Burmese government forces.The Kachin Independence Army and its political wing are incredibly well-organized for a non-state armed group. They have a nice website, trendy Facebook page, decent schools, healthcare and the other trimmings of an established state. At the time we visited the area, it was rather quiet and foreigners were not being targeted by the Kachin army. But despite the appearance of order and normalcy, the government strictly controls the movement of visitors, which meant that many places were out of our reach.To follow the green bags, we needed to jump on a boat to Bhamo. A port official told us that this was not allowed for foreigners. He advised we take the funhouse train ride back to Mandalay and then fly to Bhamo, which would have lost us at least two days.Charcoal bags from Myanmar bound for China. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.Luckily, we were stubborn enough to inquire elsewhere, until we found a boat operator who agreed to take us. The boat was large with wooden seats that were inexplicably suspended so high above the hull that our feet dangled when we sat. The toilets at the back were a couple of planks suspended above the churning water.Yet the stunning landscape of the Irrawaddy River with its alternating pastures and steep, forested banks offered up one of those days where journalism mingles with tourism.Following the charcoal trailBhamo is a bustling riverside town 80 kilometers (50 miles) from Myanmar’s border with China, and was born out of the trade between the two countries. Every day, trucks leave with raw products such as rice, pineapple or charcoal. They head to Lwegel, a town which straddles the border between the two countries. Once they’ve dropped their load, the trucks return filled to the brim with electronics, motorbikes and a flurry of consumer goods.In Bhamo, we spoke with the transporters of the charcoal trade: truck and boat drivers, who confirmed that exporting charcoal was illegal. We estimated the bribes to military officials, police and forest officers as potentially adding up to millions of dollars.Once we had established that Bhamo was a crucial nexus of the charcoal route to China, and had elected our favorite street-side restaurant, it was time to follow the green bags to their next stop: China.We knew that the road from Bhamo to a town straddling the border with China called Lwegel, it was off limits to foreigners. But we decided to see how far we could go before being stopped – we hoped to witness a checkpoint where truck drivers must pay bribes to officials. Riding motorbikes, we trailed a truck and sped through the first checkpoint just fast enough to catch bewildered stares from the police.The second checkpoint was our goal because we had been told the trucks had to queue there. Less than two kilometers from our target, Mary, who was on her own bike, suddenly slowed down. She talked with two men dressed casually, who turned out to be plainclothes officers. Unsure, we continued. With the checkpoint in sight, we were passed by a motorbike mounted by a bitter-faced military officer in a green uniform. He was yelling, “Hey! Hey! Stop!” As it was hard to ignore him, we pulled over. The officer continued to berate us: “Not allowed! Turn around!” We did as we were told – adventure over.Well, adventure diverted.The borderAfter four days of arduous travel, we would arrive just 60 kilometers (40 miles) from where the officer had stopped us, while Mary stayed in Myanmar. To see the next step in the charcoal’s journey, we had to fly back to Mandalay, stay there overnight, then fly to Kunming, the capital of China’s Yunnan province. From Kunming, we still had to drive over 750 kilometers (655 miles), which would take us two long days.Charcoal bags on a boat near Katha, Myanmar. The boat is bound for Bhamo, where the charcoal will be taken by trucks over the order to China. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.In Kunming, we rented motorcycles. As we set out, the rain started falling harder and harder, drenching us. The first day riding was spent soaking in the rain – when Nathan spoke to his girlfriend on the phone, he described it as “taking a four-hour cold shower in a wind tunnel … while not moving an inch.”Nevertheless, this was probably the most beautiful wind tunnel in the world. We slid along rolling hills and impressive canyons, carpeted with lush green forest.We had nearly reached our stop for the first night, the tourist city of Dali, when Emmanuel’s bike broke down at a gas station. The rollercoaster was heading steeply downward. Despite the valiant efforts of a random passerby at a gas station, intermediated by a translation app on our smartphones, we had to call the guy who rented us the bikes. We waited for him in the gas station restaurant, trying to dry and warm up a little bit.The rental guy became our knight in shining armor, riding to us in his white minivan, with his trusty mechanic in tow. After three hours, the knight and his sidekick fixed the motorbike. With daylight long gone, we were back on the road. It was still raining and the wind tunnel hadn’t been shut down, but we managed to make it to Dali. The next day, we reached Ruili, a town hosting the main border crossing between Myanmar and China.Trucks like this are loaded with charcoal for the 50-mile drive to China. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.For a few days, we rode our motorbikes around to small border towns. The border was sometimes just a ditch, and we found a road were trucks freely passed from one country to the other, some of them loaded with charcoal. Armed with a smartphone at the end of a pink selfie stick – embodying a tourist’s caricature – we filmed charcoal warehouses. We saw 10-meter-high (nearly 40 feet) piles of the pale green bags we were hunting for.Then we rode farther inland to find smelting factories, whose GPS coordinates we had marked on the map. There, we filmed the charcoal being thrown into burning ovens. That was the final step of the charcoal’s journey that we wanted to document.After all this, we made the two-day ride back to Kunming to return the bikes. The final day, the rain poured down as we pulled into town. It was a fitting end to a reporting trip during monsoon season, we said.Despite the foul weather, we were smiling, having gathered all the facts and photos we needed for our story. We were back on top of the roller coaster – our final stop.Banner image: A boat travels along a tributary to the Irrawaddy River. Photo by Nathan Siegel for Mongabay.*Name has been changed for the safety of the individual.Emmanuel Freudenthal is an investigative reporter whose work has appeared internationally and he can be found on Twitter at @EmmanuelFreuden. Nathan Siegel is a photographer and videographer focusing on international environmental issues. He can be found on Instagram at @npsiegel.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. charcoal, Deforestation, Forests, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Illegal Trade, Tropical Forests center_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

Guyana remain out front with easy win

first_imgPORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad (CMC): Guyana comfortably disposed of Jamaica by 31 runs to remain out front in the Regional Under-17 Championship, with one round remaining. Playing at Gilbert Park on Monday, Guyana rallied to 174 for seven off their 50 overs after being sent in, with opener Sachin Singh top-scoring with 48 and Andre Seepersaud getting 38 and Leon Swamy, 25. Singh faced 99 deliveries and struck two fours and three sixes but perished in the 33rd over with a half-century in sight. In reply, Jamaica lost Oneil Roberts without a run on the board in the opening over but recovered through the efforts of Daniel Beckford who stroked an unbeaten 73. He faced 149 balls and counted two fours but received little support and Jamaica collapsed to 143 all out in the penultimate over of the innings. Left-arm spinner Niran Bissu picked up three for 15 while Leon Swamy (2-13) and Seepersaud (2-17) finished with two wickets apiece. At the National Cricket Centre, Barbados remained in striking distance of the leaders in second when they crushed Leeward Islands by 130 runs. Sent in, Barbados benefited from half-centuries from Matthew Forde (68) and Antonio Morris (50), while Jaden Leacock struck an unbeaten 42, to get up to 245 for seven off their 50 overs. Batting at number six, Forde added 65 for the fifth wicket with Morris before adding a further 71 for the sixth with Leacock. Forde struck three fours and a six off 87 deliveries while Morris faced 72 balls and counted three boundaries. The Leewards were then restricted to 115 all out in the 34th over with new-ball bowler Jayden Hoyte claiming three for 29. Hosts Trinidad and Tobago were also in winning form as they trounced Windward Islands by 151 runs under the Duckworth-Lewis-Stern Method. They piled up an imposing 259 for seven off their 50 overs, behind Isaiah Gomez’s top score of 66, with Antonio Gomez hitting 49 and Tariq Mohammed, 43. Set a revised target of 224 off 28 overs, the Windwards were dismissed for 72 in the 26th, with left-arm spinner Nicholas Ali wrecking the innings with four for 25 and speedster Jaden Seales supporting with three for five.last_img read more

Mangled Body Found on Monrovia-Gbarnga Highway

first_imgThe stretch of paved road after Zeanzue along the Monrovia-Gbarnga Highway was the scene of sorrow and fear for passengers and nearby villagers when the mangled body of a man assumed to be a “car-boy” was found in the center of the road.Before reaching the scene, drivers and passengers would assume from the signs of leaves placed on the road that a vehicle had broken down ahead; but as they go further, they would see a group of people standing by the roadside keenly looking at a body with its head bent toward the chest, and its legs mangled.Vehicles were diverted from the main road to bypass the body, while passengers disembarked to take a closer look, expressing sorrow, and wondering who the unfortunate person is.“We don’t know this person lying dead in the center of the road. We woke up and those that first came along the road told us that a body was here, and it is how we started coming,” a villager said.“For me, I was in a car and came across the body. I don’t know how he died, but he is suspected to be crushed by other vehicles,” a passenger also said.“Oh God! Whose child is this and how did he die on the road like this? I think he was a car-boy and suspect he was coming from Monrovia to Gbanga and fell off the vehicle. We can tell by his slippers, clothes and the dragging mark on the road,” a female passenger said.From the position of the body, the head was in the direction of Gbarnga while the crushed legs pointed towards Zeanzue, which sparked up imaginations that he might have been on a car from Monrovia to Gbarnga and apparently fell off of it.The clothes on the deceased were dirty, like those worn by mechanics, while his shower slippers were old.The condition of the legs made passersby to believe that he might have fallen off the car and run over by other vehicles, who didn’t stop to assist him.Others, however, believed that he might have been a drunken resident of the area who was hit by a vehicle during the night hours.Still at the scene into the morning hours, the Daily Observer reporter did not see any police officer at the scene; he also did not see a vehicle owner coming to establish how this sad and dreadful event occurred.The road from Monrovia to the Guinea border in Ganta, Nimba County, is at the point of completion.As a result of the smooth road surface, vehicles run with excessive speed so much so that it takes such vehicles three hours to reach Monrovia, unlike in the past when they spent six to seven hours en route.This makes it dangerous for people in villages along the road to cross the road as they often do.It is a common attitude of many Liberians, including those living alongside major highways, not to quickly cross a road. Instead, they walk slowly, expecting the drivers to slow down for them. Such a situation, especially along highways like the well paved Monrovia-Ganta Highway, results in cars running people over and leaving them for dead.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Owners of cemetery asked to reopen part time

first_imgGLENDALE – City officials are asking the owners of the shuttered Grand View Memorial Park to reopen the cemetery part time, with City Hall assuming liability. Officials have been negotiating with operator Moshe Goldsman for several weeks to unlock the 121-year-old cemetery’s iron gates, which have been chained since June after the facility’s owner was accused of financial mismanagement and mishandling remains and came under state investigation. The proposal would permit the cemetery at 1341 Glenwood Road to open once a week – possibly Sundays, said Senior Assistant City Attorney Mike Grant. The city will extend insurance coverage over the 25-acre facility during visiting hours and staff the grounds with park rangers. “We’re just waiting for a commitment,” Grant said. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhy these photogenic dumplings are popping up in Los Angeles Though criminal charges against her were dropped, she is due for an administrative court hearing Aug. 21 to determine if her business license will be revoked. Even if the parties reach a deal, a partial opening is likely temporary since the cemetery’s unkept grounds and browning lawns could eventually become a fire hazard, Grant said. A permanent solution means finding a buyer for the cemetery, though that could be difficult amid the legal problems. Still, Harvey Wise is hoping he will get to visit his wife’s grave Aug. 26 – their 61st wedding anniversary. She was buried there in 2003 after she died at 82 from an inoperable brain tumor. “I’ll go over, take some clippers, clean up the headstone and stuff, and take flowers,” said Wise, 86, of Arleta, who plans take flowers from a rose and orchid garden inherited from his wife. “I’ll do a little bit of talking to her, tell her about what’s going on with the family.” eugene.tong@dailynews.com (818) 546-3304160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img David Baum, an attorney representing Goldsman, said Monday his client is willing to work with the city. “We’re optimistic that in the near future, we can open the park for limited visiting hours,” he said. The city plans to raise the issue Thursday at a civil suit hearing between the cemetery’s owners and some 25 plaintiffs with loved ones interred there. Paul Ayers, an attorney representing lead plaintiff Mary Louise Largey, said a reopening is overdue. “In light of the city’s offer, there’s no excuse for the operators to continue to keep it closed,” he said. Both Goldsman and cemetery owner Marsha Howard must agree to the proposal. Howard, who could not be reached for comment, allegedly resold already-purchased graves and illegally disposed of human remains, according to the state Department of Consumer Affairs. last_img read more

Glendale YMCA will lose lease at island camp

first_imgGLENDALE – The stewards of Catalina Island will allow a campground lease held by the Glendale YMCA to expire after both sides failed to agree to new terms, officials said Thursday. That means the Glendale Y, which for more than 80 years has operated Camp Fox – a 3 1/2 acre, 30-cabin facility on the island’s Buttonshell Beach – will end its stay there once the agreement expires at year’s end. “We don’t want to leave Camp Fox,” said John Thomas, chief executive officer at the Y. “But if we have to leave, we will continue to do camping.” At issue for the Catalina Island Conservancy, which oversees nearly the entire 48,000-acre island, is whether the Y could afford to operate the facility. The campground – currently at half-capacity because of problems with the septic tank – hosts about 1,700 children during the summer months and is subleased the rest of the year to a science education institute. But the facility deteriorated with year-round use and requires about $1.2million in repairs for the septic system, fire system upgrades and cleanup at the area dump. Both Thomas and conservancy Chief Operating Officer Mel Dinkel acknowledged the maintenance shortfalls, citing the Y’s limited finances. “The main problem was their resources and the funding they had available through their small organization,” Dinkel said. “We were hoping they would be able to find other groups that could work with them. It doesn’t appear they were able to.” Negotiations have dragged over the past year, with the conservancy finally extending the Y a letter of intent Aug.9 to renew the lease for three years, with four three-year extensions for a total of 15 years. They also agreed on a payment plan for the $1.2million needed to restore the camp. The Y, unable to agree on details in the proposal, asked for two extensions after the Aug.19 signing deadline. Thomas declined to discuss the causes, but after a meeting Wednesday, the Y’s camp committee asked to extend negotiations, which the conservancy denied, Dinkel said. “Their response was they still couldn’t sign the letter of intent,” Dinkel said. “Unfortunately, we have to move forward.” Without the Glendale Y, Dinkel said, the conservancy will appoint an interim operator once the lease expires at the end of the year, then consider offers from other groups. YMCA Los Angeles, the La Crescenta Y and Guided Discoveries, the group subleasing the camp, have shown interest, he said. But the Glendale Y is still responsible for the outstanding repairs – it has spent about $200,000 on state approvals and designs and has put the job out to bid, Thomas said. And camping will remain a part of the Y, with or without Camp Fox. “It’s our commitment to kids in this community that camping remains strong,” Thomas said. “I’m not tied to Camp Fox do or die, I’m tied to camping for kids.” “The amount of time that has been put into this has really been significant, and I’m disappointed that we couldn’t come to a conclusion that worked for both us and them,” Dinkel said. “Hopefully, we could resolve the current issues at the camp, and they’ll be able to use the camp as they had in the last 80 years.” eugene.tong@dailynews.com (818) 546-3304160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Columbus basketball teams on a roll

first_imgBy Hub City Times staffMARSHFIELD – Both Marshfield Columbus Catholic basketball teams beat Stevens Point Pacelli on Dec. 15 at the Bishop John Paul Basketball Showcase at La Crosse Aquinas High School and Viterbo University.The Dons’ girls beat the Pacelli Cardinals at Viterbo 39-26. Hailey Roehl led Columbus Catholic with 10 points.The Columbus boys beat the Cardinals 74-53 at Aquinas High School. Jarred Mandel led the Dons with 28 points. Columbus led by 19 at halftime, and improved to 8-0 with the win. The Dons play at Greenwood Jan. 4 and at Marathon Jan. 8.Meanwhile, the Columbus girls took down Greenwood on Dec. 18 at Columbus High School 54-26. Addie Baierl was the high scorer for the Dons with 16. Roehl had 10. Brooke Hinker led Greenwood with 11 points.The Columbus girls are at Neillsville Jan. 3 and at Colby on Jan. 8.last_img read more

South Africa complain of media ‘harassment’ after airport fracas

first_imgSouth Africa have accused an Australian TV station of harassing captain Faf du Plessis after a reporter was involved in a physical confrontation with a team security guard at Adelaide Airport on Monday.Du Plessis has been charged with ball-tampering by the International Cricket Council (ICC) during the second Test in Hobart, which South Africa won to clinch the series with a match to spare. (South Africa show solidarity with captain Du Plessis)A statement from team manager Dr Mohammed Moosajee on Monday said the Australian media, and Channel 9 in particular, had been advised that Du Plessis could not comment on the matter until a hearing was held.Moosajee said the South Africans were therefore disappointed that Channel 9 had “blatantly ignored” their “media protocol” both at the team hotel in Melbourne over the weekend and when the squad arrived at Adelaide airport on Monday.TV pictures showed a Channel 9 reporter trying to push his way past South Africa officials and players to ask Du Plessis for comment, as one of his colleagues had in Melbourne over the weekend. (Faf du Plessis charged with ball tampering)”This is the third incident of a reporter aggressively harassing our players with blatant disrespect of the above-mentioned media protocol,” said the statement.”The ‘reporter’ at the airport disrespected us and continued to harass Faf for comment. The ‘reporter’ was also in the unusual position of being in the middle of the players walkway to the bus.”He was advised to move three times, and did not adhere to this request. The ‘reporter’, who also had no official accreditation, then proceeded to lunge towards Faf with an unknown object causing a direct breach of security protocol.”advertisementTV pictures showed the “unknown object” to be the reporter’s microphone, which was knocked out of his hand as the security guard shoved him several times before bundling him towards a glass door.Du Plessis is likely to play in the third Test, a day-nighter which starts at Adelaide Oval on Thursday, pending the hearing. He has pleaded not guilty to the charge.last_img read more