Miege earns back-to-back football titles by thumping Andover Central in 4A-1 final

first_imgIf it wasn’t apparent already, Bishop Miege over the weekend bolstered the notion that it has a dynasty in the making in Kansas class 4A-1 football.Before a crowd of loyal fans braving freezing rain and snow at Hummer Sports Park in Topeka, the Stags wasted no time in decimating a badly overmatched Andover Central team in the championship game, handing the Jaguars a dispiriting 68-12 loss and earning their second consecutive state title.The win capped a season in which the Stags outscored opponents 742 to 209, with their only loss coming to Blue Valley, which played for a class 6A title against Derby over the weekend.“They wanted to prove the doubters wrong,” said head coach Jon Holmes of his team’s dominating season. “The kids read social media and see what people say about us.”Running back Dawson Downing, who had been considered a borderline Division I college prospect through much of his junior and senior years, put together one of the best performances of his career in the title game. Downing scored three touchdowns in the first quarter alone en route to a six touchdown, 209-yard performance.“I didn’t even realize he had six touchdowns until the game was over and you look at the stats,” Holmes said. “It was unreal.”Holmes said Downing appeared to have made the case that he can play at the highest levels in college.“Just because of all the way that he can get you yards,” Holmes said. “He showed this year that he can beat you with his speed, and that’s something a lot of the scouts wanted to see.”Despite Miege’s dominance over opponents during the past two seasons — the Stags went a combined 25-1 in 2014 and 2015 — the team won’t be facing stiffer competition from higher class schools in the playoffs anytime soon. Miege isn’t currently among the top three 4A-1 teams in terms of enrollment, and Holmes said the team will stay in the division for at least the next two seasons.“There’s some talk of reclassification after that, but for now we’re where we are,” he said.last_img read more

Psychology study explains when and why bystanders intervene in cyberbullying

first_imgShare on Facebook Share on Twitter Share Email People on social media are often unsupportive of cyberbullying victims who have shared highly personal feelings, UCLA psychologists report.Compared to face-to-face situations, bystanders are even less likely to intervene with online bullying. The researchers wanted to learn why bystanders are infrequently supportive of when bullying occurs online.In a new study, the researchers created a fictitious Facebook profile of an 18-year-old named Kate, who, in response to a post, received a mean comment — “Who cares! This is why nobody likes you” — from a Facebook friend named Sarah. That comment gets six likes.center_img LinkedIn Pinterest The study involved 118 people, ages 18 to 22, from throughout the United States, 58 percent of the participants were female, and were recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk. They were randomly divided into four groups; each group saw Sarah’s nasty comment in response to a different Facebook post from Kate. Across the four groups, Kate’s Facebook post varied in level of personal disclosure (more or less personal) and whether it was positive or negative.Two groups saw Kate make a highly personal disclosure about a relationship. “I hate it when you miss someone like crazy and you think they might not miss you back ?” (negative) or “I love it when you like someone like crazy and you think they might like you back ?” (positive).The other two groups saw Kate make a less personal comment about the popular HBO program, “Game of Thrones.” “I hate it when a Game of Thrones episode ends and you have to wait a whole week to watch more ?” or “I love it when a Game of Thrones episode ends and you can’t wait until next week to watch more ?.”Participants then responded to questions about how much they blamed Kate for being cyberbullied, how much empathy they had for Kate and how likely they would be to support her.Although the majority of participants considered Sarah’s comment an example of cyberbullying, they varied in their responses to Kate’s being bullied depending on her original post. Regardless of whether Kate’s post was positive or negative, participants viewed Kate more negatively when she posted a highly personal disclosure.“We found that when the Facebook post is a more personal expression of the victim’s feelings, participants showed lower levels of empathy and felt Kate was more to blame for being cyberbullied,” said Hannah Schacter, a UCLA graduate student in developmental psychology, and lead author of the study, which is published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior.Participants were asked, on a scale of one to five, whether they “felt for” Kate and whether they blamed Kate for Sarah’s criticism of her. Although the differences were small (about one third of point), they showed a consistent pattern of less forgiving responses when Kate posted about her personal issues as opposed to about Game of Thrones.The authors found that victim-blaming and empathy for the victim influenced whether participants would intervene by sending a supportive message to the bullying victim (Kate), posting a supportive message, or posting that they disagree with the bully’s comment. When participants felt that Kate deserved to be bullied and felt less empathy for her, they were less likely to express support for the victim.“The emotional reactions toward Kate help explain whether online bystanders are likely to support the victim,” said Jaana Juvonen, a UCLA professor of psychology and senior author of the research.“Our study suggests oversharing of personal information leads bystanders to blame and not feel for the victim,” Schacter said.On social media websites, there appear to be unwritten rules about what is acceptable, and this study suggests that oversharing personal emotions or information violates these rules, she said.“Young people need to understand that by revealing personal issues publicly online, they may make themselves more vulnerable to attacks from those seeking to harm others,” Juvonen said.Sharing your feelings with a close friend is quite different from publicly sharing with many people who don’t know you well.However, Schacter and Juvonen emphasize that the study’s findings have important implications for changing how people react when they see online bullying. Rather than placing the burden on victims to monitor their online behavior, the authors say that more online empathy is needed. This is a challenge, they note, because bystanders do not see the anguish of victims of online bullying.“Supportive messages can make a big difference in how the victim feels,” Schacter said. Other research, she noted, shows that sharing of troubles can help strengthen friendships among students and young adults.Shayna Greenberg, a recent UCLA graduate who worked with Schacter and Juvonen on the study, is a co-author.The research was partly funded by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and a Sigma Xi Grant in Aid of Research for Schacter.Previous studies on bullying by Juvonen and her colleagues have found that:Bullies are considered the “cool” kids in school.Nearly three in four teenagers say they were bullied online at least once during a 12-month period.Nearly half of the sixth graders at two Los Angeles-area schools said they were bullied by classmates during a five-day period.last_img read more

Daily Postcard: Snow Storm Hovers Over Los Alamos

first_imgDaily Postcard: View around noon Thursday on the way to Albuquerque showing a monster snow storm hovering over Los Alamos. Photo by Ken Hansonlast_img

On The Job In Los Alamos: At The Hair & Nail Studio

first_imgThe Hair & Nail Studio at 13 Sherwood Blvd. in White Rock offers a wide selection of nail colors and services. Call 505.672.9595 for an appointment. #worklosalamos #wherediscoveriesaremade. Photo by Jenn Bartram/ladailypost.com On the job Friday at The Hair & Nail Studio is Sharon Fox creating nail art for customer Melany Cordova. The studio is at 13 Sherwood Blvd. in White Rock. Call 505.672.9595 for an appointment. #worklosalamos #wherediscoveriesaremade. Photo by Jenn Bartram/ladailypost.com last_img

New Q-TOF mass spectrometry system launched

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Ann’s wish list

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Arbitration: You get what you pay for

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

Application for payment: Caledonian Modular Ltd vs Mar City Developments Ltd

first_imgThe FactsBy a letter of intent dated 19 December 2013 Caledonian Modular Ltd (“Caledonian”) engaged Mar City Developments Ltd (“Mar City”) to carry out construction works at Colindale in North London. It was common ground that letter of intent comprised a construction contract and the payment and adjudication provisions of the HGCRA applied.During early 2015 Caledonian commenced adjudication in respect of its interim application number 12 dated November 2014. On 11 March 2014 the adjudicator awarded Caledonian £642,394.23. Mar City made two payments totalling £200,000.On 30 January 2015, Caledonian issued application number 15 seeking a net payment £1,518,260.12. Mar City issued a payless notice on 5 February indicating a net payment of £6,317.07.On 13 February 2015 under cover of three e-mails Caledonian issued some documents to Mar City, including a further copy of application number 15 prefixed with the words “Final Account” with the net payment claim increased to £1,524,903.37.Caledonian did not substantially respond to Mar City’s subsequent requests for clarification other than to describe the 13 February submission as an “update”.On 19 March 2015 Caledonian issued an application for payment and Mar City responded with a payless notice dated 25 March.Caledonian subsequently claimed that its 13 February submission had been application for payment number 16 and that in the absence of a payless notice they were entitled to the sum claimed. In a second adjudication, the adjudicator agreed with Caledonian.In the following enforcement proceedings Mar City contended that the 13 February submission was not an application.The IssuesThe two main issues were as follows:Did Caledonian’s 13 February submission amount to an application for interim payment?In an enforcement application could the court decide an issue that was before the adjudicator, for example, the status of the 13 February submission, or was the court restricted to either enforcing or not enforcing the second adjudication decision?The DecisionOn the first issue, the judge had little hesitation in finding that Caledonian’s 13 February submission was not an application for payment or a valid payee’s notice where:None of the emails or the documents sent on 13 February stated that this was an application for interim paymentCaledonian’s subsequent application on 19 March 2015 did not state that it was a default notice or indicate that a payee’s notice had been sent on 13 February 2015Between 13 February 2015 and 19 March 2015 Mar City repeatedly asked Caledonian what the 13 February documents were. In response Caledonian did not state that the documents of 13 February were an application for payment.Having noted the draconian consequences of the employer’s failure to serve a payless notice in time, the judge stated that the employer must be put on notice by the contractor that time has begun to run hence interim payment claims must be set out with proper clarity.The judge was unimpressed with the suggestion that a contractor can “update” an application by a few thousand pounds when the overwhelming bulk of that application had already been the subject of a valid payless notice. He said this would defy common sense and be contrary to the purpose of the notice provisions in the Housing Grants, Construction and Regeneration Act 1996.The judge observed that this could lead to contractors regularly applying every few days with “updated” applications in the hope of gaining windfall through the employer slipping up by failing to serve a payless notice.On the second issue, the judge stated that at the enforcement stage the court could deal directly with an issue decided by the adjudicator, if as here, the issue was short, self-contained, and required no oral evidence or any other elaboration beyond what was capable of being provided during a short interlocutory hearing. Therefore the second issue could be decided by way of a declaration by the court.CommentaryFollowing the judgments in ISG vs Seevic College (2014) and Galliford Try Building vs Estura Ltd (2015), this case again emphasises how crucial it is that the employer issues valid payment notices and payless notices within the time limits imposed.Equally, however, if documents are an application for payment then this must clearly be stated and contractors must respond to reasonable questions form the employer concerning the status of submitted documents.The judge’s approach to the second issue will no doubt have resulted in considerable costs savings. However, as the judge observed, given the requirement that the issue be closely confined only in rare cases will the court be able to determine a substantive point in issue in the adjudication at the enforcement hearing.Philip Barnes Fenwick ElliottFree audio webinar: Essential construction law updateDate and time: Thursday 29 October 2015 | 11.00 – 12.00 GMTBuilding, in association with Fenwick Elliott, would like to invite you to this free to attend live audio webinar on recent legal changes and developments affecting the construction sector.Our expert panel of speakers will discuss what you need to know about the judicial process and procedures including:BIM, where are we now?Managing the construction supply chain payment charter: a legal viewBIM: Where are we now? Where are we going?To book your place, click here.last_img read more

Post-Brexit: Time to get on with things

first_imgThe EU referendum result on 24 June came as a surprise to more than a few – the UK voted out and the markets across Europe held their breath. Parts of the markets still are. However, there’s little doubt that this scenario is a political crisis with some emerging economic ramifications – it’s not a financial nor debt driven crisis.Commentators seem to agree that the Brexit result creates a landscape of uncertainty in the planning sphere, though banks and alternative lenders have both the cash and the will to invest in opportunities that are coming out of this uncertain landscape. There’s an element of policy behind the next steps for the sector and the decisions taken by government post-Brexit will have a knock on effect on the sector. Even so, the UK is still an attractive market and there’s appetite for the right assets.So let’s consider this UK planning sphere that we are operating in. After a short period (the Friday following the EU referendum to the following Monday) when the government seemed not to want to make any announcements, the secretary of state for transport was very clear in setting out, at a conference in London, that the government’s position on infrastructure was clear – now, more than ever, the UK had to be open for business and ready to attract investment in infrastructure and development from around the world.  Using the expression in the secretary of state’s speech – “investment in the long term infrastructure we need has become more important, not less”.Let’s put to one side, for the moment at least, the airport expansion debate about Gatwick vs Heathrow and this government deciding to leave that decision for the new prime minister.  While that may not make perfect planning sense, it certainly makes political and policy sense. It gives the new prime minister a policy announcement to create waves with and a sense of momentum, determination and grit.  I think the same should be said for investment in economic, environmental and social infrastructure – schools, housing, energy, road, rail and ports.  The self-inflicted political crisis does not and cannot mean that the planning world comes to a stop, that energy is not demanded, that the need to travel is cancelled, and the wish to buy or rent is given up on. In the wider market, what do we see?In relation to alternative lenders into the planning and real estate development market, a recent De Montfort University report laid out useful information. This insight mirrors our experience and thinking on the lending market in the UK – alternative lenders such as pension funds have warmed very quickly to the notion of the UK private rented sector (PRS) and are keen to put money into that portion of the housing market.  The overarching strategic policy levers are in place from London’s new mayor for the delivery of PRS. On publicly owned land, the GLA is applying an additional lever to require joint venture partners to develop approximately a third of residential units as PRS units on site when GLA land is being provided.Purpose-built student accommodation has become even more interesting; there is a soft suggestion of a shift towards accommodation which can be of a PRS type, and open to both students and non-students. This addresses the suggestion that student accommodation /ghettoisation is a problem, and certainly it encourages balance and mixed communities. PRS is pure residential use, so use of PRS for both student and market rent (subject to price) gives access to both student and wider residential markets without a change of use.In relation to sheds and logistics, with the huge and ongoing move to online shopping and e-retailing, there is a still a dearth of good shed sites and opportunities for sheds, particularly with rail links. There is a focus on some ports along the south and east coast, and in the North-east, where expansion plans need to be aligned with warehouse and distribution works.That is on the private sector side; what about the parliamentary and public side? To a relative fanfare, government announced in the Queen’s Speech the Neighbourhood Planning & Infrastructure Bill – to bring about more neighbourhood planning and more infrastructure. We expect the emphasis of that bill to shift more towards the delivery of development and infrastructure and less on the softer side of neighbourhood planning.  Proactive determined development with momentum will attract the overseas investment that we want and faced with political uncertainty, it feels like the development sector is going to have to step to the fore and show government how to get on with things.Al Watson is head of planning and environment at Taylor Wessinglast_img read more

Does not using a lawyer make you a litigant in person?

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more